Grade 1 Pacing Guide: Q3 CKLA

Q1 Guide

Q2 Guide

Q3 Guide

Q4 Guide

Listening & Learning

Overview

Week 1 - 2/4

Week 2 - 2/11

Week 3 - 2/18

Week 4 - 2/25

Week 5 - 3/4

Week 6 - 3/11

Week 7 - 3/18

Week 8 - 3/25

Week 9 - 4/1

Notes

"**Grade 1 Teachers: Please note that there will be an additional L&L lesson on some Fridays during Q3 and Q4. Please ensure you are using approximately 30 minutes of time on Fridays to complete the additional lesson. The other 90+ minutes of your literacy block are flexible. Please consult with school-based leaders to design and implement plans for the remaining portion of the literacy block.

Domain 4: Early World Civilizations:

This domain introduces students to the development of early civilizations by introducing students to the features of civilizations including the start of farming, the establishment of cities, and the creation of practices such as a writing and religion. Students will explore Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt as part of this domain. The final section in the domain includes an overview of the three major monotheistic religions- Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.

Domain 5: Early American Civilizations:

This domain includes a study of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations, exposing students to the gradual development of cities. Students will examine the fundamental features of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca, including farming, the establishment of cities and government, as well as religion. Students will be encouraged to compare and contrast each of these societies and their elements. Specifically, students will learn about the ancient Mayan city of Baakal and about the Mayan king, Pakal II. Students will also learn about Moctezuma, the Aztec ruler, and about the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. For the Inca, students will hear about the city of Machu Picchu and the role the Inca runners played in Incan society. Last, students will learn that much of what we know about the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inca today is due to the work of archaeologists. You may wish to make connections to the Mesopotamian and Ancient Egyptian civilizations students just studied in the Early World Civilizations domain. In later grades, students will build upon the knowledge of civilizations that they gain by listening to and discussing the read-alouds in this domain; the concepts and factual information that they learn now will also serve as building blocks for later, more in-depth, learning.

Unit 4

Lesson 5a

Lesson 5b

Lesson 6a

Lesson 6b

Lesson 7a

Notes

Lesson 5: In this lesson students will begin exploring Egypt, located on the continent of Africa. Make sure that you've labeled Egypt on your classroom's globe and/or map. Have a visual representation of the Nile River present (image/video) to provide students with a visual.

Lesson 5: When preparing for the Setting extension activity develop a list of possible student responses to support students when answering questions. Also, prepare a rubric and share with students so they know how they are going to be assessed on the extension activities.

Lesson 6: Continually refer back to the globe and/or map to ensure that students know the location of Egypt. Remind students of the Mesopotamian writing, cuneiform, since this lesson has to do with ancient Egyptian writing. Students should be able to see some similarities and differences between the two.

Unit 4

Lesson 7b

Lesson 8a

Lesson 8b

Lesson 9a

Lesson 9b

Notes

Lesson 7: This lesson continues the story of Meret and her mother in ancient Egypt, teaching students about their religion, or belief system.

Lesson 8: Students will learn about a building in ancient Egypt that was similar to the ziggurats of Mesopotamia. Tell students that the building was real a long time ago even though this read-aloud is a made-up story (historical fiction).

Lesson 9: This lesson's word work component calls for students to engage in a discussion. Be sure to remind students of discussion guidelines and give them response prompts (anchor charts) if necessary.

Unit 4

Lesson 10a

Lesson 10b

Lesson 11a

Lesson 11b

Notes

Lesson 10: Be intentional when dividing the class for the Introducing the Read Aloud activity. The student groupings should be as heterogeneous as possible.

Lesson 11: Review with students what they've learned about pharaohs thus far. Also, discuss how Hatshepsut is different from other pharaohs and why that difference is important. During the Civilizations Chart extension activity have students to use text evidence and content specific vocabulary when explaining their image cards. Also, make sure to intentionally group students heterogeneously when dividing them for the activity.

Unit 4

Lesson 12a

Lesson 12b

Pausing Point

Lesson 13a

Lesson 13b

Assessment

Domain 4 Pausing Point #2

Notes

Lesson 12: For the Image Card Review extension activity set a criterion for what you're looking for students to share. This can be done with the class, or teacher generated and shared with students before they present.

Pausing Point 2: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

Lesson 13: This lesson is an introduction to three major monotheistic world religions; Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Students will learn these to better understand major historical events. The chart that you begin during this lesson's extension will be revisited again in upcoming lessons.

Pacing Note:

Note: PARCC dates may effect when the lessons are completed between weeks 5 and 7. Adjust based on your schools PARCC schedule.

Unit 4

Lesson 14a

Lesson 14b

Lesson 15a

Lesson 15b

Notes

Lesson 14: Before presenting the read aloud, remind students of the anchor chart from Lesson 13. Have students look at the Judaism column to figure out what they should be listening out for during the story.

Lesson 15: During the extension activity use images from the Flip Book to remind students of relevant details from the text.

Unit 4

Lesson 16a

Lesson 16b

DR

DA

CA

Assessment

Domain 4 Assessment

Notes

Lesson 16: When introducing the read aloud explain to students that the Islamic word for God is Allah, which is in Arabic, a language spoken in various countries. Have examples of Arabic text readily available in case students inquiry more about it. They were already exposed to it at the beginning of the domain.

Domain Review: You should spend this day reviewing and reinforcing the material from this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided in either whole-group or small-group settings. If the review activities are happening in small groups, the teacher should rotate between stations while students are rotating between centers to make sure they cover them all. Add a writing accountability piece to the image card review station.

Domain Assessment: Feel free to pace out the assessment or conduct it in small groups while the remaining students are still reviewing. Part I is the vocabulary assessment, and Parts II, III, and IV of the assessment address the core content targeted in Early World Civilizations.

Culminating Activities: Choose activities based upon the domain assessment data. Students who didn't fair well should complete remediation tasks while others can partake in enrichment ones. Group students by their needs, and facilitate instruction by way of small groups attached to accountability.

Unit 5

Lesson 1a

Lesson 1b

Lesson 2a

Lesson 2b

Notes

Lesson 1: This lesson begins Domain 5, Early American Civilizations. Tell students they will learn how some people eventually settled into three different parts of the Americas and became known as the Maya, Aztec, and Inca. Tell students that they will learn more about each of these groups over the next few weeks. Also, since students have already studied Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt, you may wish to draw connections between these civilizations when applicable throughout this domain.

Lesson 2: On a globe/map, label where the Maya lived (the rainforests in Mexico and Central America, in and around what we now call the Yucatan Peninsula). Students are going to need to be able to identify this location.

Unit 5

Lesson 3a

Lesson 3b

Lesson 4a

Lesson 4b

Pausing Point

Assessment

Domain 5 Pausing Point

Notes

Lesson 3: Remind students that in the last read-aloud, they heard about how Kanal and his family went on a trip. Also, remind students about the names of the characters in the story: the main character, a young boy named Kanal; Kanal’s father, Tun; Kanal’s mother, Chanil; Kanal’s little sister, Ikal; Kanal’s Uncle Zuk (Tun’s brother); and Kanal’s cousin Pik (Zuk’s son). You may wish to review the names in conjunction with pictures of the characters from the previous read-aloud. Explain to students that the city that Kanal and his family called Baakal long ago is called Palenque today. Find Palenque on a map, and show students where it is located.

Lesson 4: Review with students what happened in lesson 3. You may also wish to review the names of the characters once again. Read the title of the read-aloud, “The Maya: The Festival of the First Star,” to students. Ask them what they think the read-aloud is about. Do they have any guesses as to why the read-aloud might be named “The Maya: The Festival of the First Star”?"

Unit 5

Lesson 5a

Lesson 5b

Lesson 6a

Lesson 6b

Notes

Lesson 5: On a world map or globe, have students locate the area where the Maya lived (the rainforests in Mexico and Central America, in and around what we now call the Yucatán Peninsula). Next, point to central Mexico (around Mexico City), and explain to students that the next civilization they will be hearing about, the Aztec civilization, was also located in what is now Mexico, north of the Maya. Explain to students that the type of story they will hear today is called a legend. Tell students that legends are kind of like folktales; they often tell a story about why things are the way they are. Explain to students that legends may or may not be true, but there is no way to prove that they are true. Often, however, many people know and repeat a legend as an explanation for something.

Lesson 6: Connect today's learning to that of previous lessons.  Review with students that the Maya were farmers and that they farmed in fields. Tell them that the Aztec also farmed, but they used a different method of farming than that of the Maya. Also, point out the genre of historical fiction.  Tell students that today they will hear a made-up story that tells true facts about the way the Aztec farmed and that they should listen out for these key details."

Skills

Overview

Week 1 - 2/4

Week 2 - 2/11

Week 3 - 2/18

Week 4 - 2/25

Week 5 - 3/4

Week 6 - 3/11

Week 7 - 3/18

Week 8 - 3/25

Week 9 - 4/1

Notes

Unit 4 Overview:

In this unit, students are are introduced to r-controlled vowel sounds (er, ar, or). Students are also introduced to the concept of syllables and will learn to read two-syllable words. Students will also be introduced to two-syllable words with a root word and a grammatical suffix (ie, "ing" and "ed") or a root word and a word formation suffix (ie, -less, -er). This unit ends with a mini-unit on descriptive writing.

Unit 5 Overview:

In this unit, students begin working with spelling alternatives that make up the "advanced code". Previously, students learned the most common spellings for each sound. In this unit, they will learn more spelling alternatives for consonant sounds. Students will review or be introduced to new spellings for the /p/, /b/, /k/, /g/, /ch/, /j/, /t/, /d/, /f/, /v/, /r/, /l/. In this unit, students are also introduced to using the suffix s to create plural nouns. At the end of the unit, there is a mini-writing unit on crafting a piece of opinion writing.

Unit 4

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Notes

Lesson 1: Students will use their Individual Code Charts in this lesson. They also will begin to consistently write the name of the day of the week and date on their worksheets, practicing the capitalization of the day and month and correct comma placement. It may be helpful to have a large calendar readily available and on display as you make reference to both the day of the week and the date. This week's spelling words are all Tricky Words, their spellings must be memorized because they don't follow the rules. It is recommended that in today’s lesson you begin a chart for the digraphs taught throughout this unit. As you introduce each new digraph, add a new line and list two or three example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section. It can be hard to say the /r/ sound in isolation. Try not to add a vowel sound before /r/ because this will obliterate the difference between /r/ and /er/. To say /r/, start saying the word red and stop before saying the vowel sound.

Lesson 2: Today you will begin teaching contractions. Prior to this lesson start a simple chart to record the different types of contractions, adding to them as you go along. You will teach nine contractions during this unit. When previewing the vocabulary during the lesson's Reading Time component ensure that students know that scales and tales are multiple-meaning words. They should understand the meanings of these words as used in the story.

Lesson 3: When familiarizing students with the Warm Up activity draw or identify a speech bubble so that students know what you're referring to. Have the contraction chart available to record this lesson's new contractions: here’s, it’s, he’s, and she’s.

Lesson 4: During the Introducing the Sound activity you may wish to refer to / ar/ as the “pirate sound.” If students need additional practice with ‘ar’  /ar/, you may use Pausing Point exercises under “Recognize and Isolate the Sounds Taught in Unit 4” and “Distinguish Similar Sounds,” as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide. In today’s lesson you will continue the chart of digraphs taught in this unit. As you introduce each new digraph, add a new line and list two or three example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section.

Unit 4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

Assessment

Lesson 5: Spelling Assessment

Notes

Lesson 5: Use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes from the spelling assessment. This will help you understand any patterns that are beginning to develop or that are persistent among individual students. The Reviewing the Sound activity is a listening exercise. The target sounds /ar/ and /er/ are spelled with basic code spellings and spelling alternatives that have not been taught yet. If students need additional practice with hearing medial sounds, you may use Pausing Point exercises under the objectives “Write Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and “Read and/or Write Phrases or Sentences,” as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

Lesson 6: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. Have the contraction chart available to record the contraction: can’t. The word can not is presented as two words so that it can be viewed as decodable and included in student materials. Once two- syllable words are taught, please write cannot as one word and share this information with students.

Lesson 7: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. You can also use Wiggle Cards from previous lessons. In today’s lesson, you will introduce the concept of a syllable to students. It is recommended that you review the Appendix, “Using Chunking to Decode Multi-syllable Words” to ensure that you are thoroughly familiar with how words are broken into syllables. The sound /or/ will also be introduced in this lesson. /or/ has a variety of spellings: ‘or’, ‘oar’, ‘ore’, ‘oor’, ‘ar’, and ‘our’. The most common spelling is ‘or’. The remaining spellings for /or/ will be introduced in later grades. During the Concept Introduction activity students should use the finger tapping gestures to practice segmenting and blending each of the words into individual sounds. Once you write out the words, remind students that sometimes multiple letters work together to create one vowel sound; e.g., the ‘i’ and ‘e’ in bike work together to stand for the /ie/ sound and the ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ in could work together to stand for the /oo/ sound. When doing the One and Two Syllable Words activity do not write the words on the board. Students are first asked to listen and then clap out the number of syllables that they hear, and not all words are decodable at this time. For more practice with minimal pairs, see the Pausing Point objectives “Recognize and Isolate the Sounds Taught in Unit 4” and “Distinguish Similar Sounds” for more exercises, as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During today's lesson you will update the chart for the digraphs taught in this lesson and add at least two example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section. If students need more practice with /or/ see the Pausing Point objective “Write Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” for more exercises.

Lesson 8: When practicing Two-Syllable Words, if students can easily decode and read the individual, one- syllable word parts of a compound word, they do not need to break each chunk down into its sounds. Also, review the meaning of adding -ing to a word. While practicing Tricky Words it can be helpful to some students if they say the sounds along with the letter names of the Tricky Words. For example, while writing the word were, they could say /w/ spelled ‘w’ and then /er/ spelled with ‘ere’. The words highlighted during the Tricky Word Cards activity should be added to the class' Tricky Word Wall.

Unit 4

Lesson 9

Lesson 10

Lesson 11

Assessment

Lesson 10: Spelling Assessment

Notes

Lesson 9: While doing the Two Syllable Words activity discuss with  students that the final consonants of some root words double when an ending is added to the root word. You also will need to discuss the meanings of –ing and –er.

Lesson 10: Following the Spelling Assessment use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes. This will help you to understand any patterns that are beginning to develop or that are persistent among individual students. During the Chaining activity have a brief discussion with students regarding the meanings of -er and -est.

Lesson 11: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. You can also additionally use Wiggle Cards from previous lessons. The Verb Identification—Present and Past Tense activity is a listening exercise, so students should not be asked to read or spell the words. If students need additional practice with chaining two-syllable words, you may use the exercises under the Pausing Point objective “Teacher Chaining with Two-Syllable Words.” When completing this activity have a brief discussion about the meanings of -ing, -er, and -est

Unit 4

Lesson 12

Lesson 13

Lesson 14

Lesson 15

Assessment

Lesson 15: Spelling Assessment

Notes

Lesson 12: You will need to have Wiggle Cards ready for the break in today’s lesson. You may use any of the cards you have already prepared for this unit or you may refer to the Lists of Supplemental Words and Phrases at the end of each lesson to create new Wiggle Cards. Before breaking into today's small groups, write some of the words or phrases from the previous Supplemental Materials section on the board. If some pairs finish early, they can illustrate one of the words or phrases. As today’s Small Group time is longer than usual, you may have time to meet with more than one group. Remember that it is important to hear each student read on a regular basis.

Lesson 13: If students need additional practice with the concept of past, present, and future, you may use the Pausing Point exercise(s) under the objective “Understand Past, Present, and Future Tense. ” It also might be useful to use a timeline. While teaching the Verb Tenses activity highlight that the words yesterday, today, and tomorrow signal the tense of a verb. If students need additional practice with this skill, you may use the Pausing Point exercise(s) listed under the objective “Understand That the Sounds /t/ and /d/ Have Spelling Alternatives” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. When working on this activity as a class, let students know that in words like smiled and baked the letter ‘e’ has two jobs It is part of ‘ed’ for the past tense and, at the same time, it works together with the preceding vowel letter to stand for a separated digraph.

Lesson 14: Have your Wiggle Cards readily available for this lesson.

Lesson 15: Use the template provided at the end of the lesson to analyze students' mistakes on the Spelling Assessment. If students need additional practice with chaining, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Read Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

Unit 4

Lesson 16

Lesson 17

Lesson 18

Lesson 19

Notes

Lesson 16: The ‘ed’ dance can be varied in many ways. Encourage students to come up with their own version of this dance. Be sure that when you sing or rap the first two lines of the song, you say the sounds, not the letter names.

Lesson 17: Before this lesson you will need to collect a few small objects that you and students can describe. Choose interesting objects with different colors and/or textures and some that make a sound. Place them in a box. Please create a chart with icons for each of the  five senses to use and display in the classroom. Please also create a chart to record adjectives that describe the animals of Green Fern Zoo.

Lesson 18: Prior to this lesson you will need to collect a few small objects that students can describe to practice adjectives. Choose interesting objects with colors and/or textures and some that make a sound. Place them in a box. You will also need a puppet or stuffed animal. If students need additional practice with chaining, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Read Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During the activity have a brief discussion about the meanings of -er, -ness, and -less.

Lesson 19: This lesson calls for students to read with a partner. You may wish to review your class guidelines for reading with a partner, such as how to take turns reading aloud and asking questions from page to page. Encourage students to use their Individual Code Chart if they come to a spelling they do not know how to read. You may also wish to use the Anecdotal Reading Record provided in the Appendix of this Teacher Guide to record students’ progress as you circulate and listen to them read with their partners.

Unit 4

Lesson 20

Lesson 21

Lesson 22

Lesson 23

Assessment

Lesson 20: Spelling Assessment

Notes

Lesson 20: Today’s advance preparation is for the writing component of the lesson: Copy onto chart paper and be prepared to display The Writing Process and The Five Senses planning template, both of which are found at the end of this lesson. The Five Senses template should include the senses icons; you will fill in this template as part of the planning process as a class. Have a bunch of green grapes for the descriptive writing lesson (or another decodable food item, e.g., chips or a lime). The instructions in this lesson assume that you use grapes; adapt as necessary if you use a different food. If students need additional practice with vowel discrimination, you may use the Pausing Point exercises listed under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

Lesson 21: Before this lesson create a descriptive word chart for students to reference when creating sentences for their paragraphs. Students should also be using the class' Tricky Word Wall when writing. A list of all the words that should be included on the wall thus far can be found on p. 129.

Lesson 22: Prior to this lesson you will need to...

  • Choose a way to display photos of the six animals from Worksheets 22.1–22.6 (show copies of worksheets, or display images on an overhead projector, etc.).
  • Display the completed The Five Senses planning template from previous lessons.
  • Create a large version of the research worksheet with a picture of a trout (located in “Class Planning” section of this lesson).
  • Assign students a specific animal to research. You may wish to do this in advance as the groupings could potentially affect your classroom configuration. Students will use this research to draft a descriptive paragraph in future lessons.
  • Gather web resources on information about animals, including video clips of animals; see Introduction for ideas.

Lesson 23: Before this lesson create a large version of the drafting template found at the end of this lesson to display.

Unit 4

Lesson 24

Lesson 25

Unit 5

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Assessment

Lesson 25: Dictation and Grammar Assessment

Notes

Lesson 24: Prior to this lesson create a large version of the Check the Draft Step by Step document found at the end of this lesson. In addition, you will play a baseball game to review reading words. Please write the words from p.147 on index cards for the review.

Lesson 25: Use the assessment analysis charts at the end of the lesson when analyzing student mistakes upon the Dictation Assessment.

Note: Because AUSL utilizes TRC and DIBELS, teachers do not need to utilize 3 instructional days to give the "Middle of Year" CKLA Assessments. Teachers can consider administering parts of these assessments in small groups during this week if the data is useful for small group instruction.

Lesson 1: For an extra challenge during the Complete the Sentence activity, after completing several of the listed examples, ask students to think of words with the sound /p/ and then come up with incomplete sentences that are missing a word that contains the sound /p/ for their classmates to complete.

Lesson 2: Before this lesson on a yellow index card, write the Tricky Word how. After reviewing the word with students, you may tape the card to the Tricky Word Wall. Each student will need one blank index card for recording the Tricky Word for today’s lesson. For the oral segmenting and blending Warm-Ups, continue to review the different types of two-syllable words students learned in Unit 4: compound words, root words with suffixes, and other types of two-syllable words in which the individual syllables cannot stand alone as separate words. In this activity, the last two words have been marked with an *. For these words, ask students to segment each syllable and tell you how to spell the word, syllable by syllable, so you can write the word on the board. When introducing today's tricky word how, you can ask students how they would spell the word how. They will probably come up with the spelling hou. Explain that in this word the sound /ou/ is spelled ‘ow’ instead of ‘ou’, just like in the Tricky Word down. Please see the Pausing Point for students needing additional help with Tricky Words. Additional exercises may also be found in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide. There is no longer a Big Book provided for this unit's reader.

Unit 5

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Assessment

Lesson 5: Spelling Assessment

Notes

Lesson 3: If students need additional practice with distinguishing similar sounds, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. If students need additional practice with distinguishing similar sounds, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During this activity notice that the first set of sentences used are not entirely decodable and are meant to be used orally. However, the second set of sentences are decodable and are meant to be written on the board.

Lesson 4: Before this lesson create a Spelling Tree for the /k/ sound, using the directions and template at the end of this lesson. You should have the Spelling Tree assembled and ready to be displayed before you begin this lesson. You should also have written the target words at the end of the lesson on leaves. If students need additional practice with the spelling alternative, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Understand That Some Sounds Have Spelling Alternatives” and the activities in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide. When previewing the vocabulary during the Reading Time activity be sure that students are familiar with the word spot in the correct context.

Lesson 5: Before this lesson write the following word  on spelling leaves: classroom, backpack, carpet, cave, black, crash, kids, barking, kicked, cornflake. If students need additional practice identifying types of sentences, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Identify and/or Write Statements and Questions” and the activities in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide.

"Lesson 6: Today you will introduce an important spelling alternative for the /ch/ sound. Students should already know the basic code spelling ‘ch’ as in chin. In this lesson you will review that spelling and introduce the spelling alternative ‘tch’ as in itch. -‘tch’ is almost never used at the beginning of a word or syllable; it is usually found after one of the “short” vowel sounds (batch, itch, etch, botch, Dutch). -‘ch’ is used in most other situations, including at the beginning of a word (chop, chain), in the final position after sounds other than the “short vowels” (beach, march, ouch, smooch), and in consonant clusters (lunch, pinch).

Unit 5

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

Lesson 9

Notes

Lesson 7: Today you will review two important spellings for the /g/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘g’ as in got, and the spelling alternative ‘gg’ as in egg.  -‘g’ is the most common spelling. It is used in most situations, including initial position (get, gift), final position (bug, bag), and in the initial consonant clusters gl– and gr– (glow, grow). -‘gg’ follows the same patterns as ‘pp’ and ‘bb’. It is never used at the beginning of a word. It is used in doubling situations (big > bigger) and after a “short” vowel sound in other multi-syllable words (dagger, snuggle, giggle). The sound /g/ (combined with the sound /z/) can also be represented by the letter ‘x’ in some words (exact, exaggerate).

Lesson 8: Today you will create a new Spelling Tree to teach and review spelling alternatives for /j/. Assemble the Spelling Tree prior to the lesson. Be sure to preview the suggested template in the teacher's guide to ensure that the branches accommodate the various spellings and align with the power bar notion, the more common the spelling the longer the branch upon the tree.

Lesson 9: Today students will work on decoding the tricky spelling ‘g’. This spelling poses a problem for readers because it can be pronounced /g/ (sometimes called hard ‘g’) or /j/ (sometimes called soft ‘g’). Hard g  /g/ is the more common pronunciation. If students come across an unfamiliar printed word containing the letter ‘g’, they should first try pronouncing the ‘g’ as /g/. If that does not sound like a word, or if the resulting word does not make sense in context, students should try /j/.  The spelling ‘g’ is usually (not always) pronounced /g/ except when followed by the letters ‘e’, ‘i’, and ‘y’. Initial ‘g’ is almost always pronounced /g/ when it is part of an initial consonant cluster like gl– or gr– (glad, grab) and when it is at the beginning of a word and followed by the letters ‘a’, ‘o’, or ‘u’ (gang, gum, go). There are exceptions to this, like the words gift, get, give, girl. Final ‘g’ is almost always pronounced /g/ (big, rag, beg) unless it is part of the ‘ng’ spelling for /ng/ (song, king)."

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