Grade 2 Pacing Guide: Q2 CKLA

Q1 Guide

Q2 Guide

Q3 Guide

Q4 Guide

Listening & Learning

Overview

Week 1 - 11/5

Weeks 2/3 - 11/13

Week 4 - 11/26

Week 5 - 12/3

Week 6 - 12/10

Week 7 - 12/17

Week 8 - 1/7

Week 9 - 1/14

Week 10 - 1/22

Week 11 - 1/28

Domain 2

Domain 3

Domain 4

 

Quarter 2 Listening and Learning Pacing Guide

Domain 2: The Human Body: The primary focus of the first half of this domain is to provide students with a basic introduction to the human body. They will be introduced to a network of body systems, comprised of organs that work together to perform a variety of vitally important jobs. They will learn the fundamental parts and functions of five body systems: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, and nervous. The narrator of these read-alouds, a rhyming pediatrician, will share rhymes that reinforce basic facts that students are expected to learn. The second half of this domain focuses on care and maintenance of the human body. Students will learn how germs can cause disease,as well as how to help stop the spread of germs. They will be introduced to two men, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, whose discoveries aided in the cure of diseases. Students will be taught five keys to good health—eat well, exercise, sleep, keep clean, and have regular checkups. By using the food pyramid and “plate” to create their own meals, students will also learn the importance of a well balanced diet. This domain will provide students with the beginning lessons they need in order to develop healthy living habits.

 

Domain 3: Different Lands, Similar Stories: This domain introduces students to three themes in folktales that have been told for generations in different countries and cultures. Students will learn valuable, universal lessons in this unit while exploring different countries and cultures. The unit is divided into three parts: the first three read alouds are stories about good people who are treated unfairly. The next three read alouds are folktales about supernaturally small characters. The last three read alouds are folktales about cunning animals who try to trick children. Students bring background knowledge to this domain from the "tall tales" 1st grade unit and two domains from kindergarten (stories, and "kings and queens").

 

Domain 4: Early World Civilizations: This domain introduces students to the development of early civilizations by introducing students to the features of civilizations including the start of farming, the establishment of cities, and the creation of practices such as a writing and religion. Students will explore Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt as part of this domain. The final section in the domain includes an overview of the three major monotheistic religions- Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.

Standards Assessed:

RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.4, and RI.K.7

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview:

This week students will begin to study early Chinese civilization

Lesson 8: You will need to use image cards and a globe/world map to familiarize students when recalling domain content. In addition to locating the country China on the world map, label it for students to refer to throughout the course of the domain. This world map should be posted on the class' domain board. Remember that the extension activities can also remain on the domain board, the information presented within them are reoccurring throughout the domain.

 

Lesson 9: When introducing the lesson, invite students to recall what they learned about writing in early India. In addition to having students talk about the word in the word work activity, also invite them to do some written responses. This can happen independently or with a partner. Push students that are ready to make their own books during the extension activity to bookmake independently, students also can work in one-to-one partnerships. This will allow you time to work with groups of students, instead of having to direct the whole-glass and/or large groups of students. "

 

 

 

 

Standards Assessed:

 

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

This week students will learn about calligraphy, then dissect an ancient Chinese folktale for meaning.

Lesson 10: Before reading today's text, review with students story elements and themes that are evident in folktales. Due to the similarities that are most likely to appear in the drawing the read-aloud images, have students sequence their pictures in small groups (ie. table groups).

Lesson 11: After using the image cards in the lesson's review activity, add them to the class' domain board. In addition to asking students the questions listed on p. 134, probe them in regards to how the images are still applicable, evident in everyday life. The extension activity can be completed in student partnerships or independently, especially since it just requires recall. When choosing a book to ""free"" read, choose domain stories that students may have forgotten or need to have a refresher on. "

 

 

 

Standards Assessed:

 

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

Students have learned about countless Chinese contributions that are still used today. However, some of these contributions are not used anymore and are just sights of wonder and tourism. This is what students will discover this week.

Lesson 12: In addition to sharing image cards with students, bring in actual artifacts to display and for students to interact with, ie. silk scarves, calligraphy on parchment paper, etc. Today's lesson is also a great one to bring in Google Earth (China's Great Wall).

Lesson 13: Although this lesson entails a comparison piece between Confucius and Siddhartha Gautama, Confucianism is not a religion, but a philosophical system for the management of society. Students need to keep this in mind when preparing to complete the venn diagram in the extension activity."

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

Domain Assessment:  Feel free to complete the assessment throughout the course of a given day.  Part I (vocabulary assessment) is divided into two sections: the  first assesses domain-related vocabulary, and the second assesses academic vocabulary. Parts II and III of the assessment address the core content targeted in Early Asian Civilizations.

 Weekly Overview

This week students will prepare for, then complete the domain's final assessment.

Lesson 14: In preparation for teaching about Chinese New Year, bring in New Year's Eve images and artifacts. Also, have students recall what they've done in the past to celebrate a new year. Students should refer to the domain board when completing the Celebrations Venn Diagram. This activity can also serve as an informal assessment.

 

Domain Review: The review activities can happen in small groups, with the teacher rotating between stations. Similar to workstations, students should rotate between them to make sure that they cover them all. Add a writing accountability piece to the image card review and sequencing stations. Instead of making a class book, students should independently complete this activity or work with a partner.

 

Culminating Activities: Choose activities based on students' performance in the Domain Assessment. Throughout the classroom you can have a variety of tasks going on dependent upon the needs of students. This day is a great time to plan a trip to Chinatown, students can eat lunch there, go to the museum, walk the square, view silk and calligraphy, etc. "

Assessment

Weekly Overview

This week students will begin learning about the Ancient Greek Civilization including the Olympian gods.

 

Lesson 1: Reacquaint students with the ancient civilizations they've previously learned about. This can be done via image cards or having student refer to past domain boards. You will need a world map to identify then label the country Greece. This will remain posted in the classroom throughout the domain. In preparation for the word work activity review prefixes with students (anchor chart). Laminate the Instructional Master 1B-1 anchor chart after copying it onto chart paper. This template can be reused in the future.

 

Lesson 2: When introducing the read aloud, choose the recall questions that students will have to answer during the Domain Assessment. All of the questions on p. 25 don't need to be asked. Also, draw the Olympian Greek gods family tree on chart paper to display on the class' domain board. Be sure to thoroughly flush out how the gods are interconnected and related. "

Assessment

 Weekly Overview

 This week students will learn about unique Greek civilization contributions that are still currently being used.

 

Lesson 3: When students are making predictions during the read aloud introduction, be sure to ask them the why behind their expectations. Also, you can add a writing component to the word work activity, having students develop/write about a mission. Remember, you can make these activities your own, instead of retelling you can incorporate a puppet show or story writing.

 

Lesson 4: When introducing the read aloud, be sure to reiterate that religion and jobs were not only important to the Greek civilization, they were also a shaping force in the formation of other civilizations as well. This lesson is a good place to bring in student knowledge about the Olympics, most were hopefully able to watch events from Olympics 2016 in Rio.

 

Assessment

Weekly Overview

This week students will examine city-states; how they came about, their citizens, trades, etc.

 

Lesson 5: When introducing the read aloud, review with students how the high Greek mountains split Greece into lots of little valleys, and how a city in each valley became its own little nation, which we refer to today as a city-state. Explain that because the Greeks were divided geographically, they did a lot of things independently of one another. Remind them that each city-state had its own government and rules, but that the Greek city-states shared the same language (Image card 1A-4).

 

Lesson 6: In the lesson introduction be sure to show students both Sparta and Athens upon a map. Students need to get an idea of how close the city-states are to one another, both of these should already be labeled on the class map. In the extension activity be sure to review with students why the gods/godesses are considered to be part of a religion. You also can use Google Earth to show students real world images of the Parthenon and Lincoln Memorial, even comparing them against the images evident in the image card. Students should also be able to recall/be knowledgeable about all of the information on the Civilization Chart."

Assessment

Pausing Point (after Lesson 7)

 Weekly Overview

"Weekly Overview: This week students will learn about the city-state of Athens and about a very important contribution that it gave to the world, democracy, a type of government that we still have today.

 

Lesson 7: During the word work activity be sure to make sure that everyone knows the meaning of democracy, this can be done though everybody writes, turn/talks, etc. The extension activity calls for students to select the form of government they would govern by. Use various media sources to expose students to various government types.

 

Pausing Point: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

 

Lesson 8: When introducing the read aloud, incorporate TPS when having students recall past information that's been taught and learned. Students can also write about receiving tributes during the word work activity.

"

Weekly Overview

Lesson 9: Today's activity within the extension, Horizontal Word Wall, can transfer across subjects. Also, push students to add additional words to the wall, synonyms of words or those that they've found in dictionaries.

 

Lesson 10: When introducing the read aloud, ensure that students have a solid foundation of philosophy and the work of philosophers. During the word work activity, encourage students to develop their own marvelous or not stems to quiz a partner on. Be sure to share the rubric and/or student checklist with students in preparation for the fictional narrative.

Weekly Overview

 This week's lessons require students to produce narrative writing, taking what they've learned from a text and applying it in a different context.

Lesson 11: When introducing the read aloud, be sure to include the why/how do you know, when asking the prediction questions listed on p. 142.

Skills

Skills

Overview

Week 1 - 11/5

Weeks 2/3 - 11/13

Week 4 - 11/26

Week 5 - 12/3

Week 6 - 12/10

Week 7 - 12/17

Week 8 - 1/7

Week 9 - 1/14

Week 10 - 1/22

Week 11 - 1/28

Domain 2

Domain 3

Domain 4

 

Quarter 2 Listening and Learning Pacing Guide

Domain 2: The Human Body: The primary focus of the first half of this domain is to provide students with a basic introduction to the human body. They will be introduced to a network of body systems, comprised of organs that work together to perform a variety of vitally important jobs. They will learn the fundamental parts and functions of five body systems: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, and nervous. The narrator of these read-alouds, a rhyming pediatrician, will share rhymes that reinforce basic facts that students are expected to learn. The second half of this domain focuses on care and maintenance of the human body. Students will learn how germs can cause disease,as well as how to help stop the spread of germs. They will be introduced to two men, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, whose discoveries aided in the cure of diseases. Students will be taught five keys to good health—eat well, exercise, sleep, keep clean, and have regular checkups. By using the food pyramid and “plate” to create their own meals, students will also learn the importance of a well balanced diet. This domain will provide students with the beginning lessons they need in order to develop healthy living habits.

 

Domain 3: Different Lands, Similar Stories: This domain introduces students to three themes in folktales that have been told for generations in different countries and cultures. Students will learn valuable, universal lessons in this unit while exploring different countries and cultures. The unit is divided into three parts: the first three read alouds are stories about good people who are treated unfairly. The next three read alouds are folktales about supernaturally small characters. The last three read alouds are folktales about cunning animals who try to trick children. Students bring background knowledge to this domain from the "tall tales" 1st grade unit and two domains from kindergarten (stories, and "kings and queens").

 

Domain 4: Early World Civilizations: This domain introduces students to the development of early civilizations by introducing students to the features of civilizations including the start of farming, the establishment of cities, and the creation of practices such as a writing and religion. Students will explore Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt as part of this domain. The final section in the domain includes an overview of the three major monotheistic religions- Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.

Standards Assessed:

 

Assessment

Spelling Assessment (Lesson 15)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 12: Advance Preparation: Write the chart from pg. 110 on chart paper or the board

Lesson 13: In preparation for this lesson, select a student’s draft book report. Copy the student’s draft, including any misspellings or other errors onto chart paper, skipping every other line to leave room for editing. Also, the chart on p.118 needs to be copied onto chart paper. When preparing students for editing, refer to various conventions by developing or reviewing an anchor chart. An anchor chart should also be made when introducing antonyms.

Lesson 14: Before this lesson pull your Vowel Code Flip Book and Individual Code Chart (p.7). Prepare and provide students with a checklist when editing and drafting the final copy of their writing piece.

Lesson 15: Before the lesson copy the chart on p.126 onto chart paper. Also, although you have students check their answers during the assessment, be sure to also analyze their work using p.131.

 

 

 

 

 

Standards Assessed:

 

Assessment

End of Unit Assessment (Lesson 16)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 16: Prioritize the Comprehension and Dictation assessment. The WPM assessment can be given to grade-level readers. Consider using the time to progress monitor students on DIBELS assessment that more closely align to their instructional level.

 

Lesson 1: In preparation for this lesson you will need to create two Spelling Tree wall displays (p. 8). Feel free to laminate the trees and leaves to reuse in later units. When choosing words for the Baseball Game activity, pick the tricky words that students are having trouble memorizing (p.9).  Also, plan heterogeneous teams in preparation for the game. Point out to students the spelling alternatives for the /ae/ sound, this will aide students when decoding (p. 13). Create then use anchor charts when highlighting the differences between fiction and non-fiction texts. This will give students a tool to refer back to in the future.

 

Lesson 2: When prepping the leaves for the spelling tree, remember that you shouldn't write the syllable division as seen in the teacher's guide.  In today's focus spelling, don't skip any activities, instead only do a few items from each ""spelling example"" if you find yourself running out of time.

 

Lesson 3: Today you will begin teaching students how to decode two syllable words with open syllables. When only one consonant stands between two vowels, first divide the word in front of the consonant and sound it out as an open syllable. You may wish to refer to the Appendix: “Using Chunking to Decode Multi-syllable Words” for additional information about these types of syllables. Today's focus activity calls for the use of green markers, you can use any sort of writing material with students to outline the appropriate card and spelling chart. To support the reading of a non-fiction text, make an anchor chart with students highlighting various non-fiction text features ie. captions, bold words, headings, labels, etc.

"

 

 

 

 

Standards Assessed:

 

Assessment

Spelling Assessment (Lesson 5)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 5: Although students correct their work during the Student Spelling Assessment, you can still consider the task as an assessment that should receive a grade. Feel free to send the Spelling Bee words home with students before this lesson. You should've also mentioned today's activity in this week's newsletter, this is a great time to get parents involved with what's happening in class! Take time when selecting your Spelling Bee teams they should be heterogeneous.

Lesson 6: You will continue to add to your class' Spelling Tree collection during this lesson.  Be sure to refer back to past trees to remind students of spellings that have been taught, especially when they're reading and/or writing independently. When completing the board sort, do not list words in the odd ducks column unless students happen to suggest them.

Lesson 7: When writing out the leaves for the Spelling Tree, you should bold or underline the spellings for the sound as seen on p. 54. The multi-syllable words for the Spelling Tree should be written on the leaves without the syllable division provided in the teacher's guide. Syllable division is provided for your information as you assist students who are experiencing difficulty.

Lesson 8: Be sure to review all sort words with students before having them independently sort. They should also be identifying the letters that are making the /oe/ sound. When introducing the story, use media to show students various types of water sports.

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

Spelling Assessment (Lesson 10)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 9: In preparation for this lesson's small group component, remind all students to pay close attention to the captions and use of quotations throughout the story. You will spend today and tomorrow listening to students read in small groups. Remember to use the Anecdotal Reading Record to record students' reading progress.

 

Lesson 10: Use the template provided to analyze the data from the Student Spelling Assessment (pp.78-79). This will help you to understand any new or persistent patterns among individual students. Student needs can be grouped and then addressed during small groups.

 

Lesson 11: When sending spelling words home with students, inform families that they will be tested on Friday. Also, provide parents with ways that they can practice words at home, this can be reinforced via nightly homework. Also, if students are not finishing worksheets in class they can be sent home as additional practice/homework.

 

Lesson 12: Turn Today's Focus Spellings activity in a game, teams can compete against each other to find the correct spelling, read the i/ie spellings, etc. This will increase student engagement and time-on task. When introducing the grammar activity, make an anchor chart with students highlighting the differences between common and proper nouns.  "

Assessment

(MOY DIBELS/TRC Window opens)

-Spelling Asssessment (Lesson 15)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 13: See the Pausing Point for students needing additional support with tricky spelling ""i."" This is also the place where you can pull work to support students in small groups.  Additional practice may also be found in Unit 3 of the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

 

Lesson 14: Be sure to refer back to past anchor charts when reviewing content that's already been addressed within skills ie. common and proper nouns.

 

Lesson 15: Although in the teacher's guide the Midpoint Decoding Assessment is administered whole group, do feel free to complete the task in small groups while others are working on Pausing Point Activities. Use pp. 109-112 when analyzing student data from the assessment, this data will determine small groups and any content that needs to be retaught.

 

Lesson 16: Create an anchor chart when introducing the concept of synonyms to students. Also ensure that they know the differences between antonyms and synonyms. While completing the board sort, students may occasionally supply a word that contains a /ue/ spelling that will not be taught in this unit. For example, students may provide the word nephew or few. Record words with spellings that will not be taught in Unit 3 under a column labeled “odd ducks.”"

Assessment

-(MOY DIBELS/TRC Window open)

-Spelling Assessment (Lesson 20)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 17: Find the time to use the supplemental materials not only in small group but also in whole group lessons. Students need more exposure to the ""skills"" they've learned this unit. Remember that you can incorporate both supplemental and Pausing Point activities into literacy workstations while guided reading is occurring.

 

Lesson 18: Review partner reading expectations with students. If at all possible tie an accountability piece to this time so that you're able to ensure that students really are doing what it is that you've outlined for them to do.

 

Lesson 19: When introducing the story, set-up students to independently complete the venn diagram, comparing and contrasting Parts I and II of “The Soccer Twins” with “Jump!” . Those who are in need of extra support can work with a partner or be pulled into a teacher led small group. If students finish partner reading early, they may illustrate one of the words or phrases from the Supplemental Materials section. Write several of these words or phrases on the board or chart paper prior to starting small group time.

 

Lesson 20: For this lesson, it might be too confusing for students to go back and repeat the words at the end of the assessment. You will need to be the judge of whether or not to repeat the prompts."

Assessment

(MOY DIBELS/TRC Window open)

Weekly Overview

The final week of Unit 3 introduces students to narrative writing. The bulk of the skills lesson is dedicated to introducing this ""mini-unit"" to students. Teachers are encouraged to give the end of unit assessments in lesson 25 throughout the week and use all five days of this week to instruct and support students in the mini-writing unit.

 

Lesson 22: For this lesson, you will need to display Worksheet 22.2. You will also need to choose an event all or most students participated in recently, e.g., a  field trip, a classroom visit, a celebration, a performance, etc. You will help students plan a narrative describing the event. While students are working, be sure to take anecdotal notes on students' personal teaching points. This will help you when conferring.

 

Lesson 23: Make sure students have the notes on topics they compiled as part of their homework (Worksheet 22.3). Throughout this lesson students will be at different steps in the writing process, because of this the needs of students will vary. Pull small groups to address the needs of students with the same needs and/or teaching points.

 

Lesson 24: In preparation for this lesson, make sure students have the drafts (Worksheet 23.2 and draft) they created yesterday. Think about partners who can work together to edit each other’s work. Depending on how you have set up partners, you might want to talk about working as a partner in this writing assignment. It is not the same as being a partner when reading aloud. Also, be sure to review the editing checklist, and provide hard copies for students to work from. "

 

Assessment

(MOY DIBELS/TRC Window open)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 1: If you don't have enough time to play with all the words provided for the Tricky Word baseball game, only choose those that the majority of students are struggling with. The syllable divisions provided in the board sort are for your quick reference if students experience difficulty in decoding the syllables. If you are in need of additional support refer to the Appendix -Using Chunking to Decode Multi-syllable Words in the Teacher's Guide.

Lesson 2: When introducing this unit's reader, feel free to point out the state of New York and the city of Brooklyn on a map. You can also use media to highlight subways, underground tunnels, elevated platforms, boroughs, etc

Lesson 3: The story comprehension pages can be included with homework. Also, provide questioning stems that parents can use at home when working with students.

Lesson 4: Remember to seek the Pausing Point for additional instructional resources for the /ie/ sound and its spellings.

 

 

Assessment

-(MOY DIBELS/TRC Window open)

-Spelling Assessment (Lesson 5)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 5: Prior to this lesson, remove three or four leaves from each branch of the /ie/ Spelling Tree. For words spelled with ‘i’, be sure to remove both one-syllable and multi-syllable words. You will use these leaves for review today and will reattach them during the lesson. Add a new branch to the Spelling Tree, labeling it ‘igh’, and write the following words on leaves to add to the tree during the lesson: light, bright, high, night, fight, fright, and sight. See the Pausing Point for additional instructional resources for the /ie/ sound and its spellings. Following the spelling assessment, you may find it helpful to use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes.The spelling analysis sheet will help you to understand any patterns beginning to develop or persisting among individual students.

 

Lesson 6: Prior to the lesson, add another branch to the /ie/ Spelling Tree, labeling it ‘y’ and prepare the following leaves for the Spelling Tree /ie/: my, by, why, shy,  fy, dry | er, near | by, butt | er |  fly, supp | ly. You will also need to write three columns on the board with the headings: /ar/, /or/, and /er/. Under the /er/ heading create the following subheadings: ‘er’, ‘ur’, and ‘ir’. Write the spelling words under the appropriate columns. (You may wish to refer to Worksheet 6.1 for a sample template for this chart.) Following the /ie/ Sound and Its Spellings activity, see the Pausing Point for additional instructional resources for the /ie/ sound and its spellings. Before teaching the Changing ‘y’ to ‘i’ and Adding –es activity it's important to understand that the  addition of –s to a verb in a sentence occurs in order to ensure subject- verb agreement. It is not necessary for second graders to know the name of this concept at this time. The focus in this lesson is on making sure students understand the spelling rule about the need to change ‘y’ to ‘i’ and then add –es, whenever the /s/ sound or letter ‘s’ is added to a word ending in ‘y.’

 

Lesson 7: Before the lesson write the sentences listed on p. 56 on the board (do not include the answers in parentheses).

 

Lesson 8: Before the lesson write the following words on leaves for the /oe/ Spelling Tree: old, told, bold, colt, roll, stroll, most, post. In preparation for the Close Reading activity, you may find yourself reviewing partner work expectations with students. During the actual Close Reading activity you may not have time to complete the provided worksheet. It can be used during the lesson if time permits or used at a later time within the unit."

 

Assessment

Spelling Assessment (Lesson 10)

Weekly Overview

Lesson 9: In preparation for this lesson you will need to add an additional branch to the existing /oe/ Spelling Tree. Label this branch ‘ow’. In addition, you should prepare leaves with the following words: slow, snow, grow, throw, glow, yell | ow, win | dow, el | bow, own | ers. The sentences listed on p. 71 also need to be written on the board before today's lesson begins. While completing the /oe/ Sound and Its Spellings activity, it's important to point out that bow may be pronounced as /b/ /ow/, as in, “The boy bowed to the queen,” or as /b/ /oe/, as in, “Tie a bow in your shoelace.”  Today's Read Time text takes place in New York City. Lesson 2 of the Teacher's Guide contains information about the manner in which New York City is divided into boroughs, as well as information about the subway system. You may wish to review this information before reading “The Subway.”

 

Lesson 10: Before the lesson begins write the word pairs listed on p. 77 on the board. Use the provided template to analyze student errors on the Spelling Assessment. While doing the Regular and Irregular Singular and Plural Nouns activity with students, you may want to point out to students that the /l/ sound is not pronounced in the words half—halves and calf—calves even though they include the letter ‘l’.

 

Lesson 11: Before this you will need to prepare a new Spelling Tree for the /ee/ sound. Label the trunk of the tree /ee/ and then add eight branches, with the longest branch on the bottom labeled as ‘y’; the following branches should go in this order, from longest to shortest: ‘e’, ‘ee’, ‘ea’, ‘ie’, ‘ey’, ‘e_e’, followed by odd ducks. In addition, you will need to write the words on p.84 on leaves for the Spelling Tree. Do not underline or bold the spellings on these leaves as students will do that as part of today’s exercise. Remember the syllable divisions are provided for your quick reference, if needed, to assist students with chunking. Please do not indicate syllable division on the leaves either. There are additional activity within the Pausing Point that aligns with the /ee/ Sound and Its Spellings activity.

 

Lesson 12: Prior to beginning this lesson, if possible, bring in a box of brand-name children’s cereal and a generic or store brand of cereal for comparing and contrasting. Alternatively, you could use commercials for various children’s products available on the Internet.

 You will also need to prepare a copy of Worksheets 12.2 and 12.3 to display during the lesson.

 Finally, write the headings on p. 92 and the sentences on p.93 on the board for the Grammar portion of this lesson. For today's Writing activity, it's totally ok for students to choose a different topic as the subject of their persuasive letter to the principal. "

 

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