Grade 8 Pacing Guide: Q2 ELA

Q1 Guide

Q3 Guide

Q4 Guide

Overview

Week 1 - 11/5

Weeks 2/3 - 11/13

Week 4 - 11/26

Week 5 - 12/3

Week 6 - 12/10

Week 7 - 12/17

Week 8 - 1/7

Week 9 - 1/14

Week 10 - 1/22

Week 11 - 1/28

Module 2B Overview

Unit 1 Overview

Grade 8 Module 2B Recommended Texts

This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 420-1185. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

In this second module, students read and analyze Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. As with any of Shakespeare’s play, many rich themes are present; in this module, students will focus primarily on the theme of control. Characters in this play are controlled by emotions, other characters, and even magic. They often attempt to manipulate others in a variety of ways. Students will examine why the characters seek control, how they try to control others, and the results of attempting to control others. In Unit 1, students will build background knowledge as they explore the appeal and authorship of Shakespeare. Students will read much of the play aloud in a Drama Circle, and will frequently reread key passages to deepen their understanding. Students will analyze differences between a film version of the play and Shakespeare’s original script.

 

In Unit 2, students will study how Shakespeare drew upon Greek mythology as he crafted the play within the play. They will continue to closely study characters who attempt to control or manipulate others in the play, and write an argument essay about whether or not Shakespeare makes the case in A Midsummer Night’s Dream that it is possible to control someone else’s actions or not. In Unit 3, students will write a “confessional” narrative from the point of view of one of the characters in A Midsummer Night’s Dream to creatively explain his or her attempts to control or manipulate someone else in the play. This performance task centers on standards NYSP12 ELA CCLS RL.8.2, RL.8.3, W.8.3, W.8.4, W.8.9a, and W.11b."

Standards Assessed:

1: RI.8.7

7: RI.8.1, RI.8.2

3. RI.8.6

4. RI.8.2, RI.8.8

Assessment

 

Note: Lesson 7 has been moved to the first week of the unit, while Lesson 2 has been omitted.

Weekly Overview

Students build background knowledge about Shakespeare and what continues to draw people to his work.

 

Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

Students read A Midsummer Night's Dream and contrast the written version with the film version of the play. Their deep understanding of the text through re-reading passages will assist them with writing a confessional narrative from the perspective of a character.

 

Lesson 1

Launching the Module: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 1

Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk

 

Omit Lesson 2

Students are familiar with finding the gist and teachers can ask students to identify the gist of the entire article or specific paragraphs. Teachers can pull small groups for students who experience difficulty citing evidence to support authors' claims and use the close reading graphic organizer included in this lesson. Lesson 4 will also give all students further exposure to analyzing claims.

 

Lesson 7

Launching A Midsummer Night’s Dream: The Universal Appeal of Shakespeare, Part 2

Instructional Protocols: Gallery Walk, Chalkboard Splash

Lesson 7 is a continuation of Lesson 1, which also addresses Shakespeare's universal appeal.

 

Lesson 3

Analyzing the Author’s Perspective: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Instructional Protocols: Discussion Appointment, Chalk Talk

 

Lesson 4

Analyzing the Central Claim and Supporting Claims: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

Instructional Protocols: Jigsaw, Quiz Quiz Trade

 

 

Standards Assessed:

5. RI.8.5, RI.8.8

6. RI.8.2, RI.8.5, RI.8.6

8. RI.8.1, RL.8.3

9. RL.8.3, RL.8.4

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

In these lessons, students analyze author's perspective and claims as well as the text structure of "The Shakespeare Shakedown.”

 

Lesson 5

Analyzing Text Structure: “The Shakespeare Shakedown”

 

Lesson 6

Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Author’s Argument and Text Structure

Question #5 will serve as Biweekly #1  and assess RI.8.6. Students will identify an opposing viewpoint in the text and the claims that the author makes in support of it.

 

BRAD:  There are no lesson plans for lessons 8 & 9 on the Q2 Engage File

 

Standards Assessed:

10. RL.8.2, RL.8.3

11. RL.8.7

12. RL.8.2, RL.8.4

13. RL.8.3

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

Students analyze theme, author's craft, and character in lessons. They also compare the film version of A Midsummer Night's Dream with its written form.

 

Lesson 10

Reading Shakespeare: Analyzing a Theme of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The focus question from A Midsummer Night's Dream Structured Notes 1.1.130-257 (What specific dialogue or incidents in this section provoke Helena to make the decision to reveal Hermia and Lysander’s plans to Demetrius? Be sure to cite specific evidence from the text to support your answer.) serves as Biweekly #2 to assess RL.8.3.

 

Lesson 11

Text to Film Comparison: Bottom the Fool

 

Lesson 12

Author’s Craft: The Poetry of the Play

The Drama Circle will function differently in this lesson. A whole class read aloud will take place first, followed by the traditional routine, where various students act out a scene.

 

Lesson 13

Analyzing Character and Theme: Tracking Control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Instructional Protocol: Three Three's in a Row

 

Module 2B

Unit 1

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 14: RL.8.2, RL.8.3, RL.8.4

Lesson 15. RL.8.2, RL.8.4

Lesson 16. RL.8.6, RL.8.7

Lesson 17. RL.8.2, RL.8.3, RL.8.4

Assessment

 

 

Weekly Overview

Students continue to analyze theme, author's craft, and character, comparing film segments of A Midsummer Night's Dream with the text while exploring the consequences that result from characters' decisions.

 

Lesson 14

Analyzing Language, Character, and Theme: World Café Discussion

Instructional Protocol: World Cafe'

 

Lesson 15

Author’s Craft: Poetry and Prose

 

Lesson 16

Text to Film Comparison: Bottom’s Transformation

 

Lesson 17

Characters’ Decisions: The Flow of Consequences in Midsummer

"

Module 2B

Unit 1

Unit 2

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 18: RL.8.5

Lesson 1: RI.3.1, SL.3.1

Lesson 2: RL.3.2, RL.3.3, W.3.8, SL.3.1

Lesson 3: RL.3.1, SL.3.1, L.3.4

Assessment

Unit 1 Assessment

BiWeekly #3: Unit 2, Lesson 2

Three Threes in a Row Note-catcher (question in the middle square)

Weekly Overview

Students take the end of Unit 1 assessment before launching into Unit 2, where they further analyze characters' motivations and themes in the play as it reaches a resolution.

Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

For the end of unit assessment, students produce an argument essay, using evidence from A Midsummer Night's Drea, in which they make a the claim that it is or is not possible to control someone else's action based on their perception of how effectively Shakespeare made this case in the play.

 

Lesson 18

End of Unit Assessment: Text to Film Comparison

Configure students' desk so that they are separated from one another and encourage an independent working enviroment. View the portion of the film that students will watch for the assessment in advance and prepare to discuss how they are expected to respond maturely (voice level zero) upon seeing the actors' revealing attire since they are in a testing environment and the clothing decisions were made by the director.

 

Unit 2

Lesson 1

Characters and Consequences

Instructional Protocol: Written Conversations

Routines and Procedures:

Students need structured notes from Unit 1 Lessons 9-17 for the I Have/Who Has vocabulary activity since they include the definitions for the words. Cut the strips for the I Have/Who Has activity in advance.

 

Lesson 2

Analyzing Character and Theme: Tracking Control in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Instructional Protocol: Three Three's in a Row

Routines and Procedures:

The center question (How does the structure of Shakespeare’s verse change in lines 418–421? How does the structure contribute to the meaning of these lines?) on the Three Threes in a Row Note-catcher will serve as Biweekly #3. The teacher will administer it as the exit ticket to assess RL.8.5. Tell students that they are not to answer the question on the center square. Instead they may find 3 three is a row above, below, or beside the central square. For a challenge/incentive/extra credit, students may also answer questions found in the four corners of the grid or the four questions surrounding the middle square. Create an exit ticket with the aforementioned question. Have students complete it independently. Substitute this exit ticket for the Closing and Assessment portion of the lesson, which students can complete for homework since they are familiar with the Evidence of Control Note-catcher.

 

Lesson 3

Analyzing the Resolution of the Play: World Café Discussion

Instructional Protocol: World Cafe"

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 4. RL.8.4, RL.8.9

Lesson 5. RL.8.4, RL.8.9

Lesson 7. RL.8.5, RL.8.9

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

Students primarily analyze the similarities and differences between Greek mythology and A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Lesson 4

Analyzing How Shakespeare’s Play Draws upon Greek Mythology: Part 1

In this lesson, students will summarize (Lesson 6) ""Pyramus and Thisbe""  as the find the gist (Lesson 4); and they will also be able to identify its narrative structure (Lesson 6). The teacher can draw students' attention to the plot and narrative structure as it meets their needs while teaching lesson 4.

 

Lesson 5

Reading Shakespeare: The Play within the Play

 

Omit Lesson 6

See Routines and Procedures notes in Lesson 4.

 

Lesson 7

Analyzing How Shakespeare’s Play Draws upon Greek Mythology: Part 3

Instructional Protocols: Chalk Talk, Gallery Walk"

Module 2B

Unit 2

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 8. RL.8.2, RL.8.3

Lesson 10.RL.8.2, RL.8

Lesson 11. RI.8.6, RI.8.8, W.8.1

Lesson 12. RL.8.1, W.8.1, W.8.4

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

Students complete the Unit 2's mid-unit assessment, finish reading A Midsummer Night's Dream, analyze the model essay, and develop a claim for their argument essay.

 

Lesson 8

Leaving the Play: All’s Well That Ends Well

Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle

 

Omit Lesson 9

It assesses the same standards as Lesson 10.

 

Lesson 10

Mid-Unit Assessment: Author’s Craft: Analyzing Shakespeare’s Craft: Part 2

 

Lesson 11

Analyzing the Model Essay: Studying Argument

 

Lesson 12

Writing an Argument Essay: Evaluating the Model

and Crafting a Claim"

Module 2B

Unit 2

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 13: W.8.1, W.8.4, W.8.5, W.8.9

Lesson 14. W.8.1, W.8.4

Lesson 15. W.9.1, W.8.4, W.8.9

Lesson 16. RL.8.2

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

-Develop a system for students to conference with the teacher when writing. How can students indicate that they need peer/teacher support and by what time will they receive it? Determine which students need more frequent writing conferences based on attention span, engagement with the topic, etc.

-Students write an argument essay, study the prompt for the performance task and decide upon which character and scene from A Midsummer Night's Dream to write their confessional narrative.

 

Lesson 13 (omit- consider assinging this as homework)

Writing an Argument Essay: Peer Critique

Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

 

Lesson 14

Writing an Argument Essay: Planning the Essay

Be intentional when circulating to support students. Prioritize students who struggle to develop their ideas and/or articulate them in written form.

 

Lesson 15

End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 1:Drafting the Argument Essay

 

Lesson 16

Launching the Performance Task: Prompt, Characters, Groups"

Module 2B

Unit 2

Unit 3

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 17. W.8.3, W.8.11b

Lesson 18. W.8.5

Lesson 1. RL.8.1, W.8.3, W.8.11b

Assessment

 

Weekly Overview

-Prepare to distribute argument essays with feedback for students. They will need access to computers as they revise their argument essays in Lesson 18. If 1:1 technology is not available, make preparations to request use of a computer lab/cart in advance. Continue to use system developed to conference with each student about his/her writing. Since Unit 3 only consists of 4 lessons, the mid-unit assessment is the very first lesson.

-Students create drafts of the confessional narratives and revise them, and defend the the character and scene they selected to write about in Unit 3's mid-unit assessment.

 

Unit Alignment to Performance Task

In Unit 3, students complete the actual performance task, the creation of a confessional narrative featuring one character and scene from A Midsummer Night's Dream.

 

Lesson 17

Planning the First Draft of the Character Confessional Narrative

Instructional Protocol: Think-Write-Pair-Share

 

Lesson 18

End of Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Revise Essay Drafts

Students are expected to have a final draft of their essay completed for homework. Determine the expectations for how students will complete an electronic version of their essay and how they will access their work from home (Google Classroom, Google Drive, etc.).

 

Unit 3

Lesson 1

Mid-Unit Assessment: Justification for Character and Scene Selection

Before drafting their narrative confessionals, students complete an assessment in which they defend the character and scene they selecte to write about using text evidence. "

Standards Addressed:

Lesson 2. W.8.3, W.8.4, W.8.5

Lesson 3. RL.8.2, RL.8.3, W.8.11

Lesson 4. RL.8.2, RL.8.3, W.8.4, W.8.11"

Assessment

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End of Unit Assessment

Weekly Overview

-Students provide feedback for one another using the Peer Critique Protocol, write about how their narrative confessional aligns with A Midsummer Night's Dream, and present a portion or the entirety of their work.

-Consider having students present their narratives to the school/neighborhood community this week. Technology can also be integrated to audio or video record students' narrative confessionals. Costumes and props can help the scenarios come alive and encourage students to get into character.

 

Lesson 2

Character Confessions: Peer Critique of Narratives

Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

 

Lesson 3

End of Unit Assessment: Commentary on Confessional

Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

Students write about how their narrative confessional connects to A Midsummer Night's Dream before continuing with the Peer Critique Protocol and making final revisions for homework.

 

Lesson 4

Final Performance Task: Character Confessional Narrative

Listening and Speaking Standards can be embedded into this lesson and accompanied by self-assessment and peer assessment rubrics. The teacher can use the self-assessment rubric provided in the Supporting Materials for this lesson as a guide. Students can replay audio/visual of their ownperformance for homework and complete the rubric for their classmates after each performance (1-2 minutes allotted for completion.)."

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