Q1 1st Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Listening & Learning:

  • Listening & Learning Overview

    Teachers: for support with BOY CKLA Assessments, please refer to this guide.

    Domain 1: Fables and Stories

    Description: This domain will introduce students to fables and stories that have delighted generations of people. By listening to these classics, students will increase their vocabulary and reading comprehension skills, learn valuable lessons about ethics and behavior, become familiar with the key elements and parts of a story, and acquire cultural literacy. For example, a student who has listened to “The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing” in this grade will be prepared to later understand a news reporter who characterizes a politician as “a wolf in sheep’s clothing.”

     

    Domain 2: The Human Body

    Description: The primary focus of the first half of this domain is to provide students with a basic introduction to the human body. An interactive approach is taken in the first six read-alouds. Students will be asked to explore and make discoveries about their own bodies. They will be introduced to a network of body systems, comprised of organs that work together to perform a variety of vitally important jobs. They will learn the fundamental parts and functions of five body systems: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, and nervous. The narrator of these read-alouds, a rhyming pediatrician, will share rhymes that reinforce basic facts that students are expected to learn.

    The second half of this domain focuses on care and maintenance of the human body. Students will learn how germs can cause disease,as well as how to help stop the spread of germs. They will be introduced to two men, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, whose discoveries aided in the cure of diseases. Students will be taught five keys to good health—eat well, exercise, sleep, keep clean, and have regular checkups. By using the food pyramid and “plate” to create their own meals, students will also learn the importance of a well balanced diet. This domain will provide students with the rudimentary lessons they need in order to develop healthy living habits. They will review and extend their learning in future grades.

    Notes:

    • In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 Turn and Talk opportunities during the fable read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share at the end of each read aloud.
    • Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smartboard, or writing the material on chart paper or a whiteboard.
  • Week 1: September 4

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    1 (2 days)

    2 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: Explain to students that a storyteller named Aesop [EE-sop] lived in Greece a very long time ago. Have students repeat the name Aesop. (You may wish to point out Greece on a world map.) In Aesop’s day, people did not have written storybooks, but they did have lots and lots of stories that they told aloud to one another. Aesop collected and told many of these stories. He became especially well-known for his fables. Like all fables, Aesop’s fables were short and were intended to teach a lesson called “the moral of the story.” Tell them that the stories they will hear in the next few days are among the many stories known as “Aesop’s Fables.”

     

    Lesson 2: You may need to remind students that a fable is a short story intended to teach a lesson, called “the moral of the story.” Ask them if they remember the moral of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” Ask students if they remember the name of the man who collected these fables. (Aesop) Tell students that you are going to read another one of Aesop’s fables today. Explain that this fable is about a milkmaid, a girl who milks cows. Tell students that the milkmaid’s job is an important one because cows need to be milked every day.

  • Week 2: September 11

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    3 (2 days)

    4 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 3:

    Tell students that the fable they are going to listen to today is about another animal that provides something useful. Tell them that this fable is about a goose. Ask students if they have ever seen a goose and if they know anything about this animal. Ask if they know what a goose provides that may be useful to people. Talk about the color of the goose egg, the fact that a goose egg is lightweight, and that a goose usually lays one egg each day.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Ask students what characters they remember from the three fables that they have already heard. You may choose to show images from the previous read-alouds to help students recall. Have students describe the various characters. Ask students what lesson the various characters learned. Tell students that they are going to hear another fable today. This fable is also short and it has a lesson. But in today’s fable, there are no people. All of the characters are animals. And the animals talk! Tell them that this is a third characteristic of fables: animals act like people. Many of Aesop’s fables have animals that act like people.

  • Week 3: September 18

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    5 (2 days)

    6 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: Remind students that they recently heard a fable called “The Dog in the Manger.” Ask them how they know that this story is a fable. You may need to remind them of some of the characteristics of fables, e.g., they are short, they have a moral, and they use personification (giving animals human qualities). Have students echo the word personification. Tell students that today’s fable has all three characteristics as well.

     

    Lesson 6: Remind students that they recently heard a fable called “The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing.” Ask them if they remember what it means when people use the phrase, “wolf in sheep’s clothing” to describe someone. You may remind students of how the wolf pretended to be a sheep to get something he wanted, but in the end he was the one who got hurt.

    Tell students that today’s fable has another phrase that is commonly used and that it is the last of the fables in this domain. Ask students to identify the characteristics of a fable. (They are short; they have a moral that teaches a lesson; some of them give animals human qualities, like talking.) Ask students whether the fables they have heard are fiction (make-believe) or nonfiction (factual).

  • Week 4: September 25

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    PP (1 day)

    7 (2 days)

    8 (2 days)

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Pausing Point:

    You should pause here and spend one day reviewing, reinforcing, or extending the material taught thus far.  You may have students do any combination of the activities listed below, but it is highly recommended you use the Mid-Domain Student Performance Task Assessment to assess students' knowledge of the six fables. The other activities may be done in any order. You may also choose to do an activity with the whole class or with a small group of students who would benefit from the particular activity.

     

    Lesson 7: Tell students that today they will hear a story called “The Little Half-Chick,” and it is a Spanish folktale. Ask if they know what a folktale is. If not, explain that a folktale is a story that someone made up a long time ago and has been told again and again. It was first told to family members or friends and later written down for many people to enjoy. Have students say the word, “folktale.” Because the story was made up, it is fiction or make-believe. Ask, “So if a story is fiction or make-believe, is it true?”

     

    Lesson 8: Begin with a brief review of yesterday’s folktale by asking the following questions:

    Do you remember the name of the folktale we heard yesterday? (The “Little Half-Chick” or “Medio Pollito”)

    What is a folktale? (a story that someone made up a long time ago and has been told again and again)

    Is a folktale true or make-believe? (A folktale is fiction or make-believe.)

    What was the lesson that Medio Pollito learned yesterday? I will give you a hint: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” (Students should explain this saying in the context of the story. Medio Pollito should have been kind and helped the water, the fire, and the wind.) Ask students if they know what a rabbi is. Ask them to repeat the word rabbi. Explain that a rabbi is a person who is trained to be a teacher or advisor in the Jewish religion. Tell students that Yiddish was the language used long ago by Jewish people, and many Yiddish phrases are still common today. Tell students that there is a rabbi and two Yiddish phrases in today’s story:

    kvetches—a Yiddish word for complains or whines

    oy vey!—a Yiddish term of dismay, such as “oh woe” or “woe is me;” it translates loosely to “how terrible”

  • Week 5: October 2

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    9 (2 days)

    10 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 9: Begin with a brief review of “The Little Half-Chick (Medio Pollito)” and “The Crowded, Noisy House.” Have a discussion with students about the lessons that they heard in both folktales. Students should be able to convey that Medio Pollito should have been kind and helped the water, fire, and wind. The lesson in “The Little Half-Chick (Medio Pollito)” is “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” Students should also be able to recall that the unfortunate man in “The Crowded, Noisy House” realized that he wasn’t so unfortunate when things kept getting worse at his house. The lesson is not to get so upset when things are going badly because . . . it could always be worse!

    Ask students to listen to see if today’s story has a lesson.

     

    Lesson 10: Begin with a brief review of “The Tale of Peter Rabbit.” Have a discussion with students about the plot of the story. Students should be able to recall the following:

    Mrs. Rabbit tells Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter not to go into Mr. McGregor’s garden while she is away and to stay out of mischief.

    However, while his sisters pick berries, Peter is naughty and disobedient.

    Peter’s sense of adventure leads him into Mr. McGregor’s garden, where he helps himself to some vegetables.

    Peter is seen and chased by Mr. McGregor, and he barely escapes.

    When he finally gets home, Peter is sick and tired, and has to go to bed, while his sisters, who were obedient, get to stay up for a nice supper.

    Ask students if they think Peter learned his lesson and if he will listen to his mother next time.

    Tell students that today’s folktale has a trickster in it, a character that tricks others. Ask students to listen to see how the trickster in this story tricks others.  Tell students that today’s story is a folktale that was probably first told in Africa. Have a student locate the continent Africa on a world map. (You may want to specifically ask them to locate the country Ghana.) Ask students what it means to say that this story is a folktale. (Folktales are stories that were told from generation to generation.) Tell students that many tales from the Ashanti people of Ghana, in Africa, begin with the same message:

    “We do not really mean, We do not really mean that what we are going to say is true.”

    Explain that this means the stories are fiction, because they are not really true.

  • Week 6: October 10

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

     DR (1 day)

    DA (1 day)

    CA (1 day)

    Assessment

    Domain Review

    Domain Assessment

    Culminating Activities

    Notes:

    Domain Review:

    You should spend one day reviewing and reinforcing the material in this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided, in either whole-group or small-group settings.

     

    Domain Assessment:

    This domain assessment evaluates each student’s retention of domain and academic vocabulary words and the core content targeted in Fables and Stories. The results should guide review and remediation the following day.

    There are four parts to this assessment. You may choose to do the parts in more than one sitting if you feel this is more appropriate for your students. Part I (vocabulary assessment) is divided into two sections: the first assesses domain-related vocabulary and the second assesses academic vocabulary. Parts II and III of the assessment address the core content targeted in Fables and Stories.

     

    Culminating Activities:

    Please use this final day to address class results of the Domain Assessment. Based on the results of the Domain Assessment and students' Tens scores, you may wish to use this class time to provide remediation opportunities that target specific areas of weakness for individual students, small groups, or the whole class.

    Alternatively, you may also choose to use this class time to extend or enrich students' experience with domain knowledge. A number of enrichment activities are provided in order to provide students with opportunities to enliven their experiences with domain concepts.

  • Week 7: October 16

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    1 (2 days)

    2 (2 days)

    Assessment

    Domain Review

    Domain Assessment

    Culminating Activities

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: Tell students that for the next few weeks they will learn about their own bodies and how they work. Explain to them that their bodies are like complicated machines made up of many different parts. Some parts are visible, while others are hidden from view, located inside their bodies.

    Make a KWL Chart to introduce this new domain. Use large chart paper so that you can add more information to the chart as students listen to multiple read-alouds. This chart will be used throughout the next five read-alouds to determine what your students may already know (K), what they wonder (W), and what they have learned (L) about how their bodies work.

    Make three columns labeled 'K,' 'W,' and 'L.' Prior to recording students' responses, point out that you are going to write down what they say, but that they are not expected to read what you write because they are still learning the rules for decoding words. Emphasize that you are writing what they say so that you don't forget, and that you will read the chart to them.

    Give students the opportunity to share anything they already know about how their bodies work. As students respond, repeat and expand upon each response using richer and more complex language, including, if possible any read-aloud vocabulary. Record students' responses under the 'K' of the KWL Chart. If a student's response includes inaccurate factual information, record it nonetheless and acknowledge the response by saying something like, “So you think that your heart is shaped like a Valentine heart? We'll have to listen very carefully to our read-alouds and find out if that's true!”

     

    Lesson 2: Remind students that Dr. Welbody, the rhyming pediatrician, said that she was going to teach them about all of the systems at work inside their bodies. Each system is made up of different organs or parts that do special jobs for the human body. The systems are all tied together in a network to keep the human body alive and healthy. Tell students that today they are going to learn about the skeletal system.

    If you have access to a model skeleton, share it with the class so that students can see the variety of bones that make up their bodies.

  • Week 8: October 23

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    3 (2 days)

    4 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 3: Remind students that Dr. Welbody, the rhyming pediatrician, is teaching them about various systems at work within their bodies. Each system is made up of different organs or parts that do special jobs for the human body. The systems are all tied together in a network to keep the human body alive and healthy.

    Ask students to share what they learned from the previous read-aloud about the skeletal system. You may want to use the model of the skeleton to point out features being discussed. You may prompt discussion with the following questions:

    Can you name some of the bones that make up the skeletal system and tell me where they are located? (ribs, spine, skull, etc.)

    What would happen if we didn't have a skeleton to support our bodies? (We would be like rag dolls and couldn't stand up.)

    Other than being the body's framework, what else does a skeleton do? (helps with movement of the body; protects important organs)

    What does your skull protect? (brain)

    Can you name some places in your body where joints help you bend? (knees, elbows, hips, shoulders, ankles, wrists, fingers, toes)

    As students share, expand their responses using richer and more complex language, including, if possible, any read-aloud vocabulary.

    Now, remind students that at the end of the previous read-aloud, Dr. Welbody said that today's lesson was about a system that works with the skeletal system to help us move. Ask students to guess the name of that system. Tell them that today they are going to learn about the muscular system.

     

    Lesson 4: Remind students that Dr. Welbody, the rhyming pediatrician, has been teaching them about various systems at work within their body. Each system is made up of different organs or parts that do special jobs for the human body. The systems are all tied together in a network to keep the human body alive and healthy.

    Ask students to share what they learned so far about the skeletal system and muscular system. You may prompt discussion with the following questions:

    Name some bones that make up the skeletal system. (Answers may vary.)

    What does the skeletal system do for the human body? (provides support as a framework; helps with movement of the body; protects important organs)

    Give an example of a bone that protects an organ. (the skull protects brain; ribs protect heart and lungs, etc.)

    What makes it possible for you to bend your body in different places? (joints)

    What system works with the skeletal system to help you move your body? (muscular system)

    Tendons are rope-like bands under the skin. What two things do they join together? (muscles and bones)

    Remember, you control voluntary muscles with your brain by thinking. Point to a voluntary muscle and tell me what you can use it to do? (Answers may vary.)

    What is the most important muscle in your body that needs to keep working for you to live? Hint: It's involuntary, meaning it works automatically. (heart)

    As students share, expand their responses using richer and more complex language, including, if possible, any read-aloud vocabulary.

    Now, remind students that at the end of yesterday's read-aloud, Dr. Welbody gave them a clue about the system they will be learning about today. In the previous read-aloud she said, “We'll have a lot to chew on.” Ask them to guess what she meant. Then, affirm that they are going to talk about food and how food travels through their bodies. Explain that today they are going to learn about the digestive system.

    It is recommended that you do a quick review of liquids and solids prior to the read-aloud if your students are unfamiliar with those terms.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    5 (2 days)

    6 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: It is recommended that Dr. Welbody's rhymes about the body systems covered thus far be written on chart paper in advance of this lesson. Tell students that you are going to pause after reading the rhyme about each body system and that you will ask several students to share one fact they have learned. Alternatively, you may also wish to divide students into three groups and assign each a body system along with the applicable rhyme; have each group share with the class what they already learned.

     

    Lesson 6: Begin by reading or having students recite Dr. Welbody's rhymes that you have up around the classroom. Have students share interesting facts about the skeletal, muscular, digestive, and circulatory systems they have learned thus far.

    Tell students that today's read-aloud is about the nervous system. Ask them to brainstorm ways that they use the word nervous in everyday speech. For example, one student may be nervous when he takes a test, while another student may be nervous when she goes to an unfamiliar place for the first time.

    Next, remind students that many of them learned about their five senses in the Kindergarten domain The Five Senses. Briefly review the five senses with students: sight, hearing, taste, touch, and smell. Tell them that their five senses send messages using the nervous system.

Skills

  • Notes to Teacher

    Notes to Teacher: Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smart Board, or writing the material on chart paper or a white board.

  • Week 1: September 4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: In the Warm-Up, students will practice first blending and then segmenting words that contain two or three sounds.

    Lesson 2: Before beginning this exercise, get out and display both the Consonant Flip Book and the Vowel Flip Book within view of all students; also have the Spelling Cards listed in the At a Glance chart readily available.

    Lesson 3: Before beginning this exercise, get out and display the Vowel Flip Book within view of all students; also have the Spelling Cards listed in the At a Glance chart readily available.

    Lesson 4: Add to the letter cards you prepared in earlier lessons by writing each of the following letters on a separate white index card: ‘m’, ‘f’, and ‘v’. Using these cards, set up the pocket chart for the chaining activity as shown in the sidebar.

  • Week 2: September 11

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8-10

    Assessment

    6: Word Recognition Test Assessment

    7: Story Reading Assessment

        Pseudoword Reading Assessment

        Code Knowledge Diagnostic Assessment

        Letter Name Assessment

    8-10: One-on-One Assessments

    CKLA BOY Assessment Guide

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: On yellow index cards, write the Tricky Words no, so, of.

    Lesson 6: Word Recognition Test Assessment (BOY Assessment)

    Lesson 7: Some of the assessments must be given one-on-one. Students not working on an assessment can read the stories on Worksheets 7.6–7.10 and complete the activities provided in the workbooks. Feel free to provide additional or other independent activities for students, including looking at trade books, writing in journals, or doing other activities that can be completed with little or no teacher assistance. Use the chart on pg. 61 of the teacher's guide to determine which assessments students need to take (BOY Assessment).

    Lessons 8-10:For the next three lessons, you will continue to work one-on-one to further assess students. You will continue assessing students who received 17 or lower (90%) on the Word Recognition Test. You will also have students who scored 3 or less on the Story Reading Test: “Gwen’s Hens” read the story to you and orally answer the comprehension questions you read aloud. For each day, there are two stories and one activity worksheet for students to complete independently. Students may also read trade books, journal write, or complete any other quiet activity you have prepared for them. Use the chart on pg. 68 of the teacher's guide to determine which assessments students need to take (BOY Assessment).

    **Data Analysis needs to occur after all skills assessments are given to determine small groups and the skills that need to be taught to individual groups of students (see pgs. 73-77 of your teacher's guide).**

  • Week 3: September 18

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    11

    12

    13

    14

    Notes:

    Lesson 11: In this lesson you will review two sets of sounds that are very similar and are sometimes confusing for students: 1. /s/ as in sip and /z/ as in zip; 2. /f/ as in fan and /v/ as in van. The sounds /s/ and /z/ are made with the same mouth position; the only difference is that /s/ is unvoiced and /z/ is voiced (buzzy sounding). The same is true of /f/ and /v/; both sounds are made with the same mouth position, but /f/ is unvoiced and /v/ is voiced.

    Lesson 12: Add to the letter cards you prepared in earlier lessons by writing each of the following letters on a separate white index card: ‘s’, ‘b’, ‘I’, ‘r’, and ‘h’.

    Lesson 13: Write all and some on yellow index cards.

    Lesson 14: Write from and word on yellow index cards

  • Week 4: September 25

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    15

    16

    17

    18

    Notes:

    Lesson 15: Write are, were, and have on yellow index cards.

    Add to the letter cards you prepared in earlier lessons by writing each of the following letters on a separate white index card: ‘e’, ‘u’, ‘j’, and ‘y’.

    Lesson 16: In Lesson 1, students reviewed the spelling ‘c’ for the /k/ sound. Today they will review an alternative spelling for the /k/ sound, ‘k. At this point, students should not be expected to know whether ’c' or ‘k’ is the correct spelling for /k/ in words that contain that sound. They will learn when to use ‘c’ and when to use ‘k’ gradually, as they get more exposure to printed words.

    Please note that /x/ consists of two sounds, /k/ and /s/. It is reviewed here as if it were one sound because it is often written with a single letter, ‘x’. There is no need to explain this to the class. If a student notices that /x/ consists of two sounds, you can confirm this and compliment the student for being a good listener.

    Lesson 17: During this lesson, students will review the digraphs ‘ch’ and ‘sh’. The term digraph refers to two letters that stand for a single sound. Students do not need to know the term digraph, but it is crucial that they understand that a letter can stand for a single sound all by itself or it can work with a second letter as part of a “letter team,” where two letters represent a single sound.

    Lesson 18: Today students will review the voiceless sound /th/ (as in thin) and the voiced sound /th/ (as in them). These two sounds are very similar—so similar that most native speakers do not realize that they are two distinct sounds. Voiced /th/ is buzzier than unvoiced /th/, i.e., your vocal cords vibrate when pronouncing voiced /th/. Place your fingers on your voice box (or press your palms against your cheeks) and compare the final sounds in teeth to teethe (or the sounds in ether and either). Both sounds are spelled with the same digraph, ‘th’, but you can feel the voiced and unvoiced difference.

    The digraph ‘th’ is the first example of a phenomenon that occurs frequently in English, where a particular letter or digraph can be sounded at least two different ways. We call these ambiguous spellings “tricky spellings.” When a beginning reader encounters a tricky spelling, he or she cannot be 100% certain which of the possible pronunciations is correct—unless he or she has heard the word in oral speech. Fortunately, it is unlikely that the tricky spelling ‘th’ will cause students much trouble, as /th/ and /th/ sound very similar.

  • Week 5: October 2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    19

    20

    21

    22

    Notes:

    Lesson 19: Today you will begin the new Reader, Snap Shots. Using the Snap Shots version of the story found on the Teacher Resources website, you will read the first story, “Beth,” to your class. You may want to practice reading this story to familiarize yourself with the online format of the Reader before presenting the story to your class. In the story, the main character, Beth, travels to the United Kingdom. To help build background knowledge, you will want to have a world map or globe available to show students the location of the United Kingdom and the United States. In addition, write the words the and who on yellow index cards.  After reading the story “Beth” to the class, students will have time to read the story on their own. Since students learn to decode at different rates, it is often helpful to divide students into three groups: one group for independent learners needing minimal teacher support, one group for students who need moderate support, and one group for students who cannot proceed with independent work on their own. For the first two groups, monitored partner reading is an effective practice. For the third group, guided small group instruction is helpful. We indicate throughout the unit when you can use small group time, but you may also use small groups if time permits for any reading portion of the lesson. Please prepare in advance how students will be grouped for this reading time.

    Remember that reading groups are to be fluid. As new code knowledge is taught, the groups need to be continually reassessed. Informal assessments, such as notes from the Anecdotal Record provided in the Teacher Resources section of this Teacher Guide, observation of daily class participation, and independently completed worksheets can be used to help inform your grouping decisions.

    Lesson 20: Note that /qu/ is a sound combination consisting of two sounds, /k/ and /w/. It is reviewed here as if it were one sound because the two letters in the digraph ‘qu’ occur as a unit. There is no need to explain this to the class. If a student notices that /qu/ consists of two sounds, you should confirm this and compliment the student for being a good listener. After reading the story “Nat” to the class, students will have time to read the story on their own. Since students learn to decode at different rates, it is often helpful to divide students into three groups: one group for independent learners needling minimal teacher support, one group for students who need moderate support, and one group for students who cannot proceed with independent work on their own. For the first two groups, monitored partner reading is an effective practice. For the third group, guided small group instruction is helpful. We indicate throughout the unit when you can use small group time, but you may also use small groups if time permits for any reading portion of the lesson. Please prepare in advance how students will be grouped for this reading time.Remember that reading groups are to be fluid. As new code knowledge is taught, the groups need to be continually reassessed. Informal assessments, such as notes from the Anecdotal Record provided in the Teacher Resources section of this Teacher Guide, can be used to help inform your grouping decisions.

    Lesson 21: Vowel Sound Review

    Lesson 22: Vowel and Consonant Sound Review

  • Week 6: October 10

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    23

    24

    25

    26

    Notes:

    Lesson 23: Randomly point to a word on the Tricky Word Wall, then call on a student to read the word and use it in a sentence.

    Lesson 24: If students need additional practice with Double-Letter Spelling, you may use the Pausing Point exercise “Write the Sound Pictures Reviewed in Unit 1.”

    Lesson 25: Write the Tricky Words was, when, and why on yellow index cards. Today you will review a number of double-letter spellings using the Consonant Flip Book. You may want to tab the pages of the Flip Book ahead of time; please see the Warm-Up section to see which pages to tab. Today you will discuss the sister sounds /s/ and /z/ with students. The sounds /s/ and /z/ are both made by positioning the tongue close to the ridge behind the upper teeth. The only difference is that /s/ is unvoiced and /z/ is voiced. The spelling ‘s’ is pronounced /s/ after unvoiced consonant sounds and /z/ after voiced consonant sounds. This is because once the voice box begins to vibrate, it “wants” to continue vibrating. When saying the word dogs, the voice box begins to vibrate with the voiced consonant sound /g/. The voice box then continues vibrating, which means that the last sound in the word is /z/, not /s/. Conversely, when saying cats, the voice box does not begin to vibrate with the unvoiced consonant sound /t/. Because the voice box does not begin to vibrate, the last sound in the word is /s/.

    Lesson 26: Today you will review a number of the double-letter spellings using the Consonant Flip Book. You may want to tab the pages of the Flip Book ahead of time; please see the Warm-Up section to see which pages to tab.

  • Week 7: October 16

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    27

    28

    29

    30

    Notes:

    Lesson 27: Write where, what, and which on yellow index cards.

    Lesson 28: For the Tricky Word Jump activity, you will need to prepare flash cards with the Tricky Words reviewed so far. If you have posted Tricky Words on a word wall, you can remove the cards for this activity. You should have at least as many cards as there are students in your class. You can make two cards for some words if needed.

    Lesson 29: Write the Tricky Words here and there on the yellow index cards.

    Lesson 30: Review

  • Week 8: October 23

    Unit

    1 / 2

    Lesson

    31

    32

    PP

    1

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Lesson 31: Review

    Lesson 32: This is the last lesson for Unit 1. Due to the extensive assessment at the beginning of Unit 1, there is no need for an end-of-unit assessment.

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 1. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

    Lesson 1: Today you will introduce the Individual Code Chart to students. You will need to organize a complete set for each child.

    In addition, you will begin a new Reader today, Gran. For today's story, you may wish to use a world map to show students the places where the grandmother travels: the Swiss Alps, Hong Kong, and a gulf.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Notes:

    Lesson 2: In today's lesson, students will write Tricky Words on their own index cards to keep for future practice. You may wish to provide students with an envelope or a plastic ziplock bag to keep these cards.

    Lesson 3: In this lesson you will introduce the first of the four separated digraphs, ‘a_e’ as in game, ‘i_e’ as in like, ‘o_e’ as in tone, and ‘u_e’ as in cute. The two letters of each digraph are working together (as a letter team) to stand for a single sound, but the letters are separated from each other by another spelling. Reading words with separated digraphs therefore poses a new challenge to students. So far, students have been taught to read words from left to right, but in order to read words with separated digraphs, they need to begin scanning to the right and then glancing back again to the left. Students must practice this skill many times before it becomes automatic. Please note that this lesson does not contain a Warm-Up exercise.

    Lesson 4: Review Vowel Digraphs

    Lesson 5: Each student will need two blank index cards for recording the Tricky Words for today's lesson.