Q3 1st Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 16-17

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 15-16

Listening & Learning

  • Listening & Learning: Domain 4 Overview

    Domain 4: Early World Civilizations

    This domain will introduce students to the development of early civilizations by examining the fundamental features of civilizations, including the advent of farming, establishment of cities and government, and creation of other practices, such as writing and religion. It should be noted that the word civilization, as used in this domain, is not meant to convey a value judgment but to indicate a group of people collectively established with shared practices. Starting in the ancient Middle East, students will study Mesopotamia. They will learn about the importance of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the development of cuneiform as the earliest-known form of writing, the first codification of laws known as the Code of Hammurabi, and the significance of gods and goddesses in the “cradle of civilization.” Students will then explore ancient Egypt and be able to compare and contrast Mesopotamia and Egypt. They will learn about the importance of the Nile River; the use of hieroglyphs; the rise of pharaohs, including Tutankhamun and Hatshepsut; the building of the Sphinx and pyramids; and the significance of mummification and the afterlife for ancient Egyptians. In the first two parts of the domain, the concept of religion (polytheism) in Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt is introduced as one of the major forces shaping those civilizations. The end of the domain provides a historical introduction to the development of three world religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—which are all characterized by a belief in a single God. The first read-aloud on religion acts as an introduction for the next three and connects this information to what students have already learned about the early civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt. This part of the domain will help provide students with a basic vocabulary for understanding many events and ideas in history throughout later grades.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 6 of the Domain 4 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the Supplemental Guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons can be taught either whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for Read Alouds throughout the Domain can be found on pgs. 8-10 of your Domain 4 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg. 11 of the Teacher's Guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the Guide.

     

    Review the Culminating Activities to determine if any can be used throughout the Domain to increase student engagement and synthesize student knowledge of the domain concepts.

     

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 active student engagement opportunities (look-lean-whisper, stop and jot, turn and talk, call and response, response cards, etc) during the read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share at the end of each read aloud.

  • Listening & Learning: Domain 5 Overview

    Domain 5: Early American Civilizations

    This domain includes a study of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations, exposing students to the gradual development of cities. Students will examine the fundamental features of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca, including farming, the establishment of cities and government, as well as religion. Students will be encouraged to compare and contrast each of these societies and their elements. Specifically, students will learn about the ancient Mayan city of Baakal and about the Mayan king, Pakal II. Students will also learn about Moctezuma, the Aztec ruler, and about the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. For the Inca, students will hear about the city of Machu Picchu and the role the Inca runners played in Incan society. Last, students will learn that much of what we know about the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inca today is due to the work of archaeologists. You may wish to make connections to the Mesopotamian and Ancient Egyptian civilizations students just studied in the Early World Civilizations domain. In later grades, students will build upon the knowledge of civilizations that they gain by listening to and discussing the read-alouds in this domain; the concepts and factual information that they learn now will also serve as building blocks for later, more in-depth, learning.

     

    The following kindergarten domains, and the specific core content that was targeted in those domains, are particularly relevant to the read- alouds students will hear in Early American Civilizations. This background knowledge will greatly enhance your students’ understanding of the read-alouds they are about to enjoy:

     

    Native Americans

    • Explain that there are many tribes of Native Americans

    • Identify the Lakota Sioux as a nomadic tribe

    • Identify the Wampanoag as a settled tribe

     

    Kings and Queens

    • Describe what a king or queen does

    • Describe appropriate dress and manners used in meeting and/or talking with kings and queens

    • Explain that proper dress and manners in the presence of a member of the royal family are signs of respect for the importance of that person

    • Describe kings as usually possessing gold and other treasures

     

    Columbus and the Pilgrims

    • Identify the continents of North America, South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia

    • Describe the acts of Christopher Columbus

    Note: It is important to help students understand that the Maya, Aztec, and Inca developed powerful civilizations prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus, who they learned about in Kindergarten.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 4 of the Domain 4 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the Supplemental Guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for Read Alouds throughout the Domain can be found on pgs. 6-8 of your Domain 4 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg.8 of the Teacher's Guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the Guide.

     

    Review the Culminating Activities to determine if any can be used throughout the Domain to increase student engagement and synthesize student knowledge of the domain concepts.

     

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 active student engagement opportunities (look-lean-whisper, stop and jot, turn and talk, call and response, response cards, etc) during the read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share at the end of each read aloud.

  • Week 1: February 6

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    1 - Part A

    1 - Part B

    2 - Part A

    2 - Part B

    3 - Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will begin Domain 4, Early World Civilizations. Tell students that for the next few weeks they will pretend to travel back in time to learn how two different groups of people lived thousands of years ago in places known as Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt.

     

    Lesson 1: Constantly remind students that although the lives of the ancient people who lived long ago were very different, there were many ways that we are just like them. Also, use a globe or map when pointing out the continent of Asia and the Middle East/Mesopotamia. The Civilizations Chart that you create for the extension activity is a living document that will be used throughout the domain.

     

    Lesson 2: Because you're going to keep referring back to the globe/map before lessons, make sure that you've labeled Asia and the Middle East/Mesopotamia. Today's read aloud builds upon the one previously heard in Lesson 1. Remind students of the content addressed within lesson 1, and let them know that today's listening focus is writing and what it looks like across the world. If possible, share various types of writing with students, Chinese, Arabic, Greek, etc.

     

    Lesson 3: It is recommended that when teaching about religion the tone be one of respect and balance. Should questions about truth and rightness come up in discussion, an appropriate answer is, “People of different faiths believe different things to be true. These are questions you may want to talk about with your family and the adults at home.” It also is advised to inform parents and caregivers of this rationale prior to covering these topics so that families understand that teachers are teaching historical and cultural facts and are not preaching. A family letter (Instructional Master 12B-1) is included in the Appendix that can be used to communicate this to students’ families.

  • Week 2: February 13

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    3 - Part B

    4 - Part A

    4 - Part B

    PP1

    5 - Part A

    Assessment

    Pausing Point 1

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will take the domain's first Pausing Point assessment that covers various content from Lessons 1-4.

     

    Lesson 3: Be intentional when choosing student partnerships for Interactive Illustrations. Every student should have a partner who pushes his/her thinking. Also, record dictation for your troubled writers so that they remember what they wrote. During this activity also be sure to circulate, giving student partnerships in the moment feedback as well as noting any trends you see across the class as a whole.

     

    Lesson 4: When reviewing with students what they've already learned about Babylon, provide some images and/or artifacts to reinforce what they're able to recall. When creating the time line in the extension activity, be sure that it's large enough for students to interact with, they'll be taping various index cards to it. When developing their takeaway from Hammurabi’s time for the time line, students can work individually or with a partner. This may help with quality control.

     

    Pausing Point 1: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

     

    Lesson 5: In this lesson students will begin exploring Egypt, located on the continent of Africa. Make sure that you've labeled Egypt on your classroom's globe and/or map. Have a visual representation of the Nile River present (image/video) to provide students with a visual.

  • Week 3: February 20

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    5- Part B

    6 - Part A

    6 - Part B

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will dive into Ancient Egypt several thousands of years ago. Explain to students that part of the read-aloud is factual information about the Egyptians, and the other part is a made-up story with characters (historical fiction).

     

    Lesson 5: When preparing for the Setting extension activity develop a list of possible student responses to support students when answering questions. Also, prepare a rubric and share with students so they know how they are going to be assessed on the extension activities.

     

    Lesson 6: Continually refer back to the globe and/or map to ensure that students know the location of Egypt. Remind students of the Mesopotamian writing, cuneiform, since this lesson has to do with ancient Egyptian writing. Students should be able to see some similarities and differences between the two.

  • Week 4: February 27

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    7 - Part A

     7 - Part B

    8 - Part A

    8 - Part B

    9 - Part A

     

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will learn about the ancient Egyptian gods, what they looked like, and what kinds of things they did.

     

    Lesson 7: This lesson continues the story of Meret and her mother in ancient Egypt, teaching students about their religion, or belief system.

     

    Lesson 8: Students will learn about a building in ancient Egypt that was similar to the ziggurats of Mesopotamia. Tell students that the building was real a long time ago even though this read-aloud is a made-up story (historical fiction).

     

    Lesson 9: This lesson's word work component calls for students to engage in a discussion. Be sure to remind students of discussion guidelines and give them response prompts (anchor charts) if necessary.

  • Week 5: March 6

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    9 - Part B

    10 - Part A

    10 - Part B

    11 - Part A

    11 - Part B

     

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will hear about another ancient Egyptian leader, a pharaoh named Hatshepsut. There is something very different about this leader compared to the other leaders they have learned about thus far.

     

    Lesson 9: Be sure to do the Syntactic Awareness Activity extension in conjunction with the complex text presented within the read-aloud. When introducing the activity make sure to model expectations, model with the help of a student, and have students practice with each other before they begin to engage in the task independently.

     

    Lesson 10: Be intentional when dividing the class for the Introducing the Read Aloud activity. The student groupings should be as heterogeneous as possible.

     

    Lesson 11: Review with students what they've learned about pharaohs thus far. Also, discuss how Hatshepsut is different from other pharaohs and why that difference is important. During the Civilizations Chart extension activity have students to use text evidence and content specific vocabulary when explaining their image cards. Also, make sure to intentionally group students heterogeneously when dividing them for the activity.

  • Week 6: March 13

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    12-Part A

    12-Part B

    PP2

    13-Part A

    13-Part B

    Assessment

    Pausing Point 2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will take the domain's second Pausing Point assessment that covers various content from Lessons 1-12.

     

    Lesson 12: For the Image Card Review extension activity set a criterion for what you're looking for students to share. This can be done with the class, or teacher generated and shared with students before they present.

     

    Pausing Point 2: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

     

    Lesson 13: This lesson is an introduction to three major monotheistic world religions; Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Students will learn these to better understand major historical events. The chart that you begin during this lesson's extension will be revisited again in upcoming lessons.

  • Week 7: March 20

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    14-Part A

    14-Part B

    15-Part A

    15-Part B

    16-Part A

     

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    This week we will dive into learning about three different religions that all began in the Middle East; Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

     

    Lesson 14: Before presenting the read aloud, remind students of the anchor chart from Lesson 13. Have students look at the Judaism column to figure out what they should be listening out for during the story.

     

    Lesson 15: During the extension activity use images from the Flip Book to remind students of relevant details from the text.

     

    Lesson 16: When introducing the read aloud explain to students that the Islamic word for God is Allah, which is in Arabic, a language spoken in various countries. Have examples of Arabic text readily available in case students inquiry more about it. They were already exposed to it at the beginning of the domain.

  • Week 8: March 27

    Domain

    4

    5

    Lesson

    16-Part B

    DR

    DA

    CA

    1-Part A

    Assessment

    Domain Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    This week students will prepare for Domain 4's final assessment. Students will be assessed on content from Lessons 1-16.

     

    Lesson 16: Ensure that students finish their Three-Column Chart: Three World Religions during this lesson. This will help them when reviewing for the upcoming Domain Assessment.

     

    Domain Review: You should spend this day reviewing and reinforcing the material from this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided in either whole-group or small-group settings. If the review activities are happening in small groups, the teacher should rotate between stations while students are rotating between centers to make sure they cover them all. Add a writing accountability piece to the image card review station.

     

    Domain Assessment: Feel free to pace out the assessment or conduct it in small groups while the remaining students are still reviewing. Part I is the vocabulary assessment, and Parts II, III, and IV of the assessment address the core content targeted in Early World Civilizations.

     

    Culminating Activities: Choose activities based upon the domain assessment data. Students who didn't fair well should complete remediation tasks while others can partake in enrichment ones. Group students by their needs, and facilitate instruction by way of small groups attached to accountability.

     

    Lesson 1: This lesson begins Domain 5, Early American Civilizations. Tell students they will learn how some people eventually settled into three different parts of the Americas and became known as the Maya, Aztec, and Inca. Tell students that they will learn more about each of these groups over the next few weeks. Also, since students have already studied Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt, you may wish to draw connections between these civilizations when applicable throughout this domain.

  • Week 9: April 3

    Domain

    5

    Lesson

    1 - Part B

    2 - Part A

    2 - Part B

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will learn how the Maya got their food and where they lived.

     

    Lesson 1: The Civilizations Chart that you make during the extension activity will be revisited throughout the domain. Make certain that students are familiar with it and know how to use the information detailed upon it.

     

    Lesson 2: On a globe/map, label where the Maya lived (the rainforests in Mexico and Central America, in and around what we now call the Yucatan Peninsula). Students are going to need to be able to identify this location.

Skills

  • Skills: Notes to Teachers

    Notes to Teacher:

    Notes to Teacher: Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smartboard, or writing the material on chart paper or a whiteboard.

  • Week 1: February 6

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

     

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: Students will use their Individual Code Charts in this lesson. They also will begin to consistently write the name of the day of the week and date on their worksheets, practicing the capitalization of the day and month and correct comma placement. It may be helpful to have a large calendar readily available and on display as you make reference to both the day of the week and the date. This week's spelling words are all Tricky Words, their spellings must be memorized because they don't follow the rules. It is recommended that in today’s lesson you begin a chart for the digraphs taught throughout this unit. As you introduce each new digraph, add a new line and list two or three example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section. It can be hard to say the /r/ sound in isolation. Try not to add a vowel sound before /r/ because this will obliterate the difference between /r/ and /er/. To say /r/, start saying the word red and stop before saying the vowel sound.

     

    Lesson 2: Today you will begin teaching contractions. Prior to this lesson start a simple chart to record the different types of contractions, adding to them as you go along. You will teach nine contractions during this unit. When previewing the vocabulary during the lesson's Reading Time component ensure that students know that scales and tales are multiple-meaning words. They should understand the meanings of these words as used in the story.

     

    Lesson 3: When familiarizing students with the Warm Up activity draw or identify a speech bubble so that students know what you're referring to. Have the contraction chart available to record this lesson's new

     contractions: here’s, it’s, he’s, and she’s.

     

    Lesson 4: During the Introducing the Sound activity you may wish to refer to / ar/ as the “pirate sound.” If students need additional practice with ‘ar’  /ar/, you may use Pausing Point exercises under “Recognize and Isolate the Sounds Taught in Unit 4” and “Distinguish Similar Sounds,” as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide. In today’s lesson you will continue the chart of digraphs taught in this unit. As you introduce each new digraph, add a new line and list two or three example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section.

  • Week 2: February 13

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    5-Spelling Assessment

     

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: Use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes from the spelling assessment. This will help you understand any patterns that are beginning to develop or that are persistent among individual students. The Reviewing the Sound activity is a listening exercise. The target sounds /ar/ and /er/ are spelled with basic code spellings and spelling alternatives that have not been taught yet. If students need additional practice with hearing medial sounds, you may use Pausing Point exercises under the objectives “Write Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and “Read and/or Write Phrases or Sentences,” as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 6: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. Have the contraction chart available to record the contraction: can’t. The word can not is presented as two words so that it can be viewed as decodable and included in student materials. Once two- syllable words are taught, please write cannot as one word and share this information with students.

     

    Lesson 7: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. You can also use Wiggle Cards from previous lessons. In today’s lesson, you will introduce the concept of a syllable to students. It is recommended that you review the Appendix, “Using Chunking to Decode Multi-syllable Words” to ensure that you are thoroughly familiar with how words are broken into syllables. The sound /or/ will also be introduced in this lesson. /or/ has a variety of spellings: ‘or’, ‘oar’, ‘ore’, ‘oor’, ‘ar’, and ‘our’. The most common spelling is ‘or’. The remaining spellings for /or/ will be introduced in later grades. During the Concept Introduction activity students should use the finger tapping gestures to practice segmenting and blending each of the words into individual sounds. Once you write out the words, remind students that sometimes multiple letters work together to create one vowel sound; e.g., the ‘i’ and ‘e’ in bike work together to stand for the /ie/ sound and the ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘l’ in could work together to stand for the /oo/ sound. When doing the One and Two Syllable Words activity do not write the words on the board. Students are first asked to listen and then clap out the number of syllables that they hear, and not all words are decodable at this time. For more practice with minimal pairs, see the Pausing Point objectives “Recognize and Isolate the Sounds Taught in Unit 4” and “Distinguish Similar Sounds” for more exercises, as well as the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During today's lesson you will update the chart for the digraphs taught in this lesson and add at least two example words. Ensure you have the Vowel Code Flip Book and the Spelling Card mentioned in the At a Glance section. If students need more practice with /or/ see the Pausing Point objective “Write Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” for more exercises.

     

    Lesson 8: When practicing Two-Syllable Words, if students can easily decode and read the individual, one- syllable word parts of a compound word, they do not need to break each chunk down into its sounds. Also, review the meaning of adding -ing to a word. While practicing Tricky Words it can be helpful to some students if they say the sounds along with the letter names of the Tricky Words. For example, while writing the word were, they could say /w/ spelled ‘w’ and then /er/ spelled with ‘ere’. The words highlighted during the Tricky Word Cards activity should be added to the class' Tricky Word Wall.

  • Week 3: February 20

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    Assessment

    10-Spelling Assessment

     

    Lesson 9: While doing the Two Syllable Words activity discuss with  students that the final consonants of some root words double when an ending is added to the root word. You also will need to discuss the meanings of –ing and –er.

     

    Lesson 10: Following the Spelling Assessment use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes. This will help you to understand any patterns that are beginning to develop or that are persistent among individual students. During the Chaining activity have a brief discussion with students regarding the meanings of -er and -est.

     

    Lesson 11: Prepare this lesson's Wiggle Cards beforehand, write out the phrases large enough so that all can view to decode. You can also additionally use Wiggle Cards from previous lessons. The Verb Identification—Present and Past Tense activity is a listening exercise, so students should not be asked to read or spell the words. If students need additional practice with chaining two-syllable words, you may use the exercises under the Pausing Point objective “Teacher Chaining with Two-Syllable Words.” When completing this activity have a brief discussion about the meanings of -ing, -er, and -est.

  • Week 4: February 27

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    12

    13

    14

    15

    Assessment

    15-Spelling Assessment

     

    Lesson 12: You will need to have Wiggle Cards ready for the break in today’s lesson. You may use any of the cards you have already prepared for this unit or you may refer to the Lists of Supplemental Words and Phrases at the end of each lesson to create new Wiggle Cards. Before breaking into today's small groups, write some of the words or phrases from the previous Supplemental Materials section on the board. If some pairs finish early, they can illustrate one of the words or phrases. As today’s Small Group time is longer than usual, you may have time to meet with more than one group. Remember that it is important to hear each student read on a regular basis.

     

    Lesson 13: If students need additional practice with the concept of past, present, and future, you may use the Pausing Point exercise(s) under the objective “Understand Past, Present, and Future Tense. ” It also might be useful to use a time line. While teaching the Verb Tenses activity highlight that the words yesterday, today, and tomorrow signal the tense of a verb. If students need additional practice with this skill, you may use the Pausing Point exercise(s) listed under the objective “Understand That the Sounds /t/ and /d/ Have Spelling Alternatives” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. When working on this activity as a class, let students know that in words like smiled and baked the letter ‘e’ has two jobs It is part of ‘ed’ for the past tense and, at the same time, it works together with the preceding vowel letter to stand for a separated digraph.

     

    Lesson 14: Have your Wiggle Cards readily available for this lesson.

     

    Lesson 15: Use the template provided at the end of the lesson to analyze students' mistakes on the Spelling Assessment. If students need additional practice with chaining, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Read Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

  • Week 5: March 6

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    16

    17

    18

    19

     

    Lesson 16: The ‘ed’ dance can be varied in many ways. Encourage students to come up with their own version of this dance. Be sure that when you sing or rap the first two lines of the song, you say the sounds, not the letter names.

     

    Lesson 17: Before this lesson you will need to collect a few small objects that you and students can describe. Choose interesting objects with different colors and/or textures and some that make a sound. Place them in a box. Please create a chart with icons for each of the  five senses to use and display in the classroom. Please also create a chart to record adjectives that describe the animals of Green Fern Zoo.

     

    Lesson 18: Prior to this lesson you will need to collect a few small objects that students can describe to practice adjectives. Choose interesting objects with colors and/or textures and some that make a sound. Place them in a box. You will also need a puppet or stuffed animal. If students need additional practice with chaining, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Read Words That Contain Vowel Digraphs” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During the activity have a brief discussion about the meanings of -er, -ness, and -less.

     

    Lesson 19: This lesson calls for students to read with a partner. You may wish to review your class guidelines for reading with a partner, such as how to take turns reading aloud and asking questions from page to page. Encourage students to use their Individual Code Chart if they come to a spelling they do not know how to read. You may also wish to use the Anecdotal Reading Record provided in the Appendix of this Teacher Guide to record students’ progress as you circulate and listen to them read with their partners.

  • Week 6: March 13

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    20

    21

    22

    23

    Lesson 20: Today’s advance preparation is for the writing component of the lesson: Copy onto chart paper and be prepared to display The Writing Process and The Five Senses planning template, both of which are found at the end of this lesson. The Five Senses template should include the senses icons; you will fill in this template as part of the planning process as a class. Have a bunch of green grapes for the descriptive writing lesson (or another decodable food item, e.g., chips or a lime). The instructions in this lesson assume that you use grapes; adapt as necessary if you use a different food. If students need additional practice with vowel discrimination, you may use the Pausing Point exercises listed under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and the activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 21: Before this lesson create a descriptive word chart for students to reference when creating sentences for their paragraphs. Students should also be using the class' Tricky Word Wall when writing. A list of all the words that should be included on the wall thus far can be found on p. 129.

     

    Lesson 22: Prior to this lesson you will need to:

    • Choose a way to display photos of the six animals from Worksheets 22.1–22.6 (show copies of worksheets, or display images on an overhead projector, etc.).
    • Display the completed The Five Senses planning template from previous lessons.
    • Create a large version of the research worksheet with a picture of a trout (located in “Class Planning” section of this lesson).
    • Assign students a specific animal to research. You may wish to do this in advance as the groupings could potentially affect your classroom configuration. Students will use this research to draft a descriptive paragraph in future lessons.
    • Gather web resources on information about animals, including video clips of animals; see Introduction for ideas.

     

    Lesson 23: Before this lesson create a large version of the drafting template found at the end of this lesson to display.

     

    Assessment

    20-Spelling Assessment

  • Week 7: March 20

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    24

    25

    26

    27

    Lesson 24: Prior to this lesson create a large version of the Check the Draft Step by Step document found at the end of this lesson. In addition, you will play a baseball game to review reading words. Please write the words from p.147 on index cards for the review.

     

    Lesson 25: Use the assessment analysis charts at the end of the lesson when analyzing student mistakes upon the Dictation Assessment.

     

    Lesson 26: Before this lesson make one copy of the word list at the end of this lesson for use during the Word Reading in Isolation Assessment. Also, Make one copy for each student of the Word Reading in Isolation Scoring Sheet, also found at the end of this lesson. For the next three days, you will be administering the mid-year assessment. Students will first read a story and answer comprehension questions, then work one-on-one with you to read words in order to identify specific letter- sound correspondences that require targeted remediation. Instructions are provided as to how to progress with students based on their scores. When working one-on-one with students, you will need to have activities prepared for the rest of your class to work on independently.

     

    Lesson 27: Before this lesson make one copy of the word list at the end of this lesson for use during the Word Reading in Isolation Assessment. Also, Make one copy for each student of the Word Reading in Isolation Scoring Sheet, also found at the end of this lesson. For the next three days, you will be administering the mid-year assessment. Students will  first read a story and answer comprehension questions, then work one-on-one with you to read words in order to identify specific letter- sound correspondences that require targeted remediation. Instructions are provided as to how to progress with students based on their scores. When working one-on-one with students, you will need to have activities prepared for the rest of your class to work on independently.

    Assessment

    25 - Dictation Assessment

         Grammar Assessment

    26-28 Mid Year Assessment

     

  • Week 8: March 27

    Unit

    4

    5

    Lesson

    28

    PP

    1

    2

    Lesson 28: Before this lesson make one copy of the word list at the end of this lesson for use during the Word Reading in Isolation Assessment. Also, Make one copy for each student of the Word Reading in Isolation Scoring Sheet, also found at the end of this lesson. For the next three days, you will be administering the mid-year assessment. Students will  first read a story and answer comprehension questions, then work one-on-one with you to read words in order to identify specific letter- sound correspondences that require targeted remediation. Instructions are provided as to how to progress with students based on their scores. When working one-on-one with students, you will need to have activities prepared for the rest of your class to work on independently.

     

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 4. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 1: For an extra challenge during the Complete the Sentence activity, after completing several of the listed examples, ask students to think of words with the sound /p/ and then come up with incomplete sentences that are missing a word that contains

    the sound /p/ for their classmates to complete.

     

    Lesson 2: Before this lesson on a yellow index card, write the Tricky Word how. After reviewing the word with students, you may tape the card to the Tricky Word Wall. Each student will need one blank index card for recording the Tricky Word for today’s lesson. For the oral segmenting and blending Warm-Ups, continue to review the different types of two-syllable words students learned in Unit 4: compound words, root words with suffixes, and other types of two-syllable words in which the individual syllables cannot stand alone as separate words. In this activity, the last two words have been marked with an *. For these words, ask students to segment each syllable and tell you how to spell the word, syllable by syllable, so you can write the word on the board. When introducing today's tricky word how, you can ask students how they would spell the word how. They will probably come up with the spelling hou. Explain that in this word the sound /ou/ is spelled ‘ow’ instead of ‘ou’, just like in the Tricky Word down. Please see the Pausing Point for students needing additional help with Tricky Words. Additional exercises may also be found in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide. There is no longer a Big Book provided for this unit's reader.

    Assessment

    28- Mid Year Assessment

    Pausing Point

     

  • Week 9: April 3

    Unit

    5

    Lesson

    3

    4

    5

    Assessment

    5- Spelling Assessment

     

    Lesson 3: If students need additional practice with distinguishing similar sounds, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. If students need additional practice with distinguishing similar sounds, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Distinguish Similar Sounds” and activities in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. During this activity notice that the first set of sentences used are not entirely decodable and are meant to be used orally. However, the second set of sentences are decodable and are meant to be written on the board.

     

    Lesson 4: Before this lesson create a Spelling Tree for the /k/ sound, using the directions and template at the end of this lesson. You should have the Spelling Tree assembled and ready to be displayed before you begin this lesson. You should also have written the target words at the end of the lesson on leaves. If students need additional practice with the spelling alternative, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Understand That Some Sounds Have Spelling Alternatives” and the activities in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide. When previewing the vocabulary during the Reading Time activity be sure that students are familiar with the word spot in the correct context.

     

    Lesson 5: Before this lesson write the following word  on spelling leaves: classroom, backpack, carpet, cave, black, crash, kids, barking, kicked, cornflake. If students need additional practice identifying types of sentences, you may use the Pausing Point exercises under the objective “Identify and/or Write Statements and Questions” and the activities in the Unit 5 Assessment and Remediation Guide.