Q4 1st Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Listening & Learning

  • Teacher Notes

    Notes:

    **Grade 1 Teachers: Please note that there no L&L lesson on Fridays (this started in Q3). We have added a new Domain for the 2016-17 school year and in order to fit in all of the lessons, we will need to complete 30 minutes of L&L instruction on Fridays during Q3 and Q4. The remaining 90 minutes of your literacy block can be used for Skills instruction, small groups, remediation and enrichment, like it has been previously.

     

    Domain 5: Early American Civilizations

    This domain includes a study of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations, exposing students to the gradual development of cities. Students will examine the fundamental features of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca, including farming, the establishment of cities and government, as well as religion. Students will be encouraged to compare and contrast each of these societies and their elements. Specifically, students will learn about the ancient Mayan city of Baakal and about the Mayan king, Pakal II. Students will also learn about Moctezuma, the Aztec ruler, and about the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. For the Inca, students will hear about the city of Machu Picchu and the role the Inca runners played in Incan society. Last, students will learn that much of what we know about the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inca today is due to the work of archaeologists. You may wish to make connections to the Mesopotamian and Ancient Egyptian civilizations students just studied in the Early World Civilizations domain. In later grades, students will build upon the knowledge of civilizations that they gain by listening to and discussing the read-alouds in this domain; the concepts and factual information that they learn now will also serve as building blocks for later, more in-depth, learning.

     

    The following kindergarten domains, and the specific core content that was targeted in those domains, are particularly relevant to the read- alouds students will hear in Early American Civilizations. This background knowledge will greatly enhance your students’ understanding of the read-alouds they are about to enjoy:

     

    Native Americans

    • Explain that there are many tribes of Native Americans
    • Identify the Lakota Sioux as a nomadic tribe
    • Identify the Wampanoag as a settled tribe

     

    Kings and Queens

    • Describe what a king or queen does
    • Describe appropriate dress and manners used in meeting and/or talking with kings and queens
    • Explain that proper dress and manners in the presence of a member of the royal family are signs of respect for the importance of that person
    • Describe kings as usually possessing gold and other treasures

     

    Columbus and the Pilgrims

    • Identify the continents of North America, South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia
    • Describe the acts of Christopher Columbus

     

    Note: It is important to help students understand that the Maya, Aztec, and Inca developed powerful civilizations prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus, who they learned about in kindergarten.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 4 of the Domain 5 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the Supplemental Guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for read alouds throughout the domain can be found on pp. 6-8 of your Domain 5 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg.8 of the teacher's guide. These lists can also be found in the teacher resource pages at the end of the guide.

     

    Review the Culminating Activities to determine if any can be used throughout the domain to increase student engagement and synthesize student knowledge of the domain concepts.

     

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 active student engagement opportunities (look-lean-whisper, stop and jot, turn and talk, call and response, response cards, etc) during the read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share and discussion at the end of each read aloud.

     

    Domain 6: Astronomy

    In this domain students will be introduced to the solar system—our home in space. They will learn that Earth, the planet on which we live, is just one of many different celestial bodies within the solar system. They will learn how the Sun, the stars, the moon, and the other planets relate to the Earth (given its position in space). In the early read-alouds, students will learn that the Sun is a giant star as well as a source of light, heat, and energy for the Earth. They will also learn about the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, and how the earth’s own rotation on its axis leads to the phenomenon of day and night.

     

    Part of this domain is focused on the history of space exploration and the missions to the moon. Students will learn about NASA, the Space Race, the Apollo missions, and what it takes to be an astronaut. Students will get a good introduction to the basics of astronomy in this domain, and this foundation will be built upon when students study the solar system in much greater depth in the third grade.

     

    The following Kindergarten domains, and the specific core content that was targeted in those domains, are particularly relevant to the read-alouds students will hear in Astronomy. This background knowledge will greatly enhance your students’ understanding of the read-alouds they are about to enjoy:

     

    Seasons and Weather

    • Identify the following units of time and their relationship to one another: day, week, month, year
    • Characterize the North and South Poles as always cold in temperature, the middle section of the earth as usually warm, and the United States as having four seasons
    • Describe any unique seasonal differences that are characteristic of their own locality (change of color and dropping of leaves in autumn; snow or ice in winter; increased rain and/or flooding in spring; etc.)
    • Identify a thermometer as an instrument used to measure temperature, and describe how it works: i.e., as the temperature becomes warmer, the liquid in the thermometer rises; as the temperature becomes cooler, the liquid in the thermometer descends

     

    Taking Care of the Earth

    • Explain that Earth is composed of land, water, and air
    • Explain that humans, plants, and animals depend on Earth’s land, water, and air to live
    • Explain that natural resources are things found in nature that are valuable and of great importance to people
    • Explain that land, air, and water all suffer from different types of pollution, and most types of pollution are caused by human activities
    • Compare and contrast freshwater, salt water, and wastewater
    • Explain that many living things, including humans, need fresh water to survive, and that there is a limited supply of freshwater on Earth

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 4 of the Domain 6 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the Supplemental Guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for read alouds throughout the domain can be found on pgs. 6-8 of your Domain 6 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg.8 of the teacher's guide. These lists can also be found in the teacher resource pages at the end of the guide.

     

    Review the Culminating Activities to determine if any can be used throughout the domain to increase student engagement and synthesize student knowledge of the domain concepts.

     

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 active student engagement opportunities (look-lean-whisper, stop and jot, turn and talk, call and response, response cards, etc) during the read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share and discussion at the end of each read aloud.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Domain

    5

    Lesson

    3-Part A

    3-Part B

    4-Part A

    4-Part B

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will be introduced to various characters. One in fact will be a king, King Pakal. Students will learn about the significance of burial tombs.

     

    Lesson 3: Remind students that in the last read-aloud, they heard about how Kanal and his family went on a trip. Also, remind students about the names of the characters in the story: the main character, a young boy named Kanal; Kanal’s father, Tun; Kanal’s mother, Chanil; Kanal’s little sister, Ikal; Kanal’s Uncle Zuk (Tun’s brother); and Kanal’s cousin Pik (Zuk’s son). You may wish to review the names in conjunction with pictures of the characters from the previous read-aloud. Explain to students that the city that Kanal and his family called Baakal long ago is called Palenque today. Find Palenque on a map, and show students where it is located.

     

    Lesson 4: Review with students what happened in lesson 3. You may also wish to review the names of the characters once again. Read the title of the read-aloud, “The Maya: The Festival of the First Star,” to students. Ask them what they think the read-aloud is about. Do they have any guesses as to why the read-aloud might be named “The Maya: The Festival of the First Star”?"

  • Week 2: April 23

    Domain

    5

    Lesson

    PP

    5-Part A

    5-Part B

    6-Part A

    6-Part B

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will be introduced to the Aztec civilization. They also will listen to a legend in lesson 5, you may wish to draw parallels between legends and the folktales students have heard in previous domains.

     

    Pausing Point: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

     

    Lesson 5: On a world map or globe, have students locate the area where the Maya lived (the rainforests in Mexico and Central America, in and around what we now call the Yucatán Peninsula). Next, point to central Mexico (around Mexico City), and explain to students that the next civilization they will be hearing about, the Aztec civilization, was also located in what is now Mexico, north of the Maya. Explain to students that the type of story they will hear today is called a legend. Tell students that legends are kind of like folktales; they often tell a story about why things are the way they are. Explain to students that legends may or may not be true, but there is no way to prove that they are true. Often, however, many people know and repeat a legend as an explanation for something.

     

    Lesson 6: Connect today's learning to that of previous lessons.  Review with students that the Maya were farmers and that they farmed in fields. Tell them that the Aztec also farmed, but they used a different method of farming than that of the Maya. Also, point out the genre of historical fiction.  Tell students that today they will hear a made-up story that tells true facts about the way the Aztec farmed and that they should listen out for these key details.

  • Week 3: April 30

    Domain

    5

    Lesson

    7-Part A

    7-Part B

    8-Part A

    8-Part B

    9-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will be introduced to emperors and explorers. Be sure to highlight parallels between these with content students are already familiar with.

     

    Lesson 7: Explain to students that this read-aloud is about Moctezuma (mok-the-ZOO-ma) the Second, the emperor of the Aztec empire. Ask students if they know what an emperor is. If not, explain that an emperor is the ruler of an empire, like a king. This means that, like a king, he ruled people. Ask students if we have an emperor today who rules us. Guide discussion to help students understand that we do have people in power—for example presidents, senators, governors, and mayors—who help rule us, even though we do not have an emperor. An emperor usually rules over people and their land, often against peoples' will.

     

    Lesson 8: Discuss with students their predictions about who the “strangers” were from the last read-aloud. Explain to students that those strangers were actually Spaniards (people from Spain), who sailed to the Aztec region on ships. Remind students that in kindergarten, they studied about Christopher Columbus and his travels to the Americas. Tell students that many Spanish soldiers and explorers traveled to the Americas after Christopher Columbus made the first trip in 1492. One of those explorers was this man, Hernán Cortés, who led the Spaniards to Mexico. On a world map or globe, show students where Spain is located. Trace the path across the ocean from Spain to Mexico. When preparing for the read aloud, consider printing the text and putting it in an envelope addressed to the Queen of Spain from Hernan Cortez.

     

    Lesson 9: Review the 2 other civilizations that students have learned about (Maya, Aztec). Also, locate and label them on the class' map/globe.  Tell students that they will learn about a third civilization today called the Inca.  Let them know that they will hear some true facts about the Inca as a part of the made-up story. Ask them to listen to the read-aloud to see how the Inca leader is the same as the Maya and Aztec leaders, and how the Inca leader is different.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Domain

    5

    Lesson

    9-Part B

    10- Part A

    10-Part B

    11-Part A

    11-Part B

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will continue to learn about the last Early American Civilization they'll be introduced to, the Inca.

     

    Lesson 10: Remind students that in the last read-aloud, they learned that the Inca built twenty thousand miles of roads. The roads were very important for the Inca emperor because he ruled over such a huge area of land. The roads helped connect the people from the Andes Mountains to the Pacific coast. Tell students that today’s story is called “The Inca: The Runner.” Ask them what comes to mind when they think about runners (responses might include names of famous Olympians or their own joy of running). Then tell students that the runner in today’s read-aloud runs for his job. Ask them to predict who this runner works for and what his job could be.

     

    Lesson 11: Remind students that because the Inca did not have a written language, there was no record of this time period in history. Explain to students that because there were no records, much of what we know about the Inca is because of the work of archaeologists like Hiram Bingham.  Tell students that an archaeologist is a person who studies ancient civilizations by examining the remains of old buildings, graves, and tools dug from the ground. Archaeologists study these remains to learn how people lived a long time ago. Explain to students that the act of finding something other people don’t know about is called a discovery, and that many archaeologists can spend their entire lives searching for just one special piece of history. Tell students that some discoveries may be very small, and in some cases, discoveries are amazingly large. Let them know that they will learn about the fascinating job of the archaeologist Hiram Bingham, and his amazing discovery in the read-aloud they are about to hear. Create a timeline anchor chart to display the dates that are revealed in the read aloud.

  • Week 5: May 14

    Domain

    5

    6

    Lesson

    DR

    DA

    CA

    1-Part A

    1-Part B

    Assessment

    Domain Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will prepare for Domain 5's final assessment. Students will be assessed on content from Lessons 1-11.

     

    Domain Review: You should spend this day reviewing and reinforcing the material from this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided in either whole-group or small-group settings. If the review activities are happening in small groups, the teacher should rotate between stations while students are rotating between centers to make sure they cover them all. Add a writing accountability piece to the image review station.

     

    Domain Assessment: Feel free to pace out the assessment or conduct it in small groups while the remaining students are still reviewing. Part I is the vocabulary assessment, and Part II of the assessment address the core content targeted in the Early American Civilizations domain.

     

    Culminating Activities: Choose activities based upon the domain assessment data. Students who didn't fair well should complete remediation tasks while others can partake in enrichment ones. Group students by their needs, and facilitate instruction by way of small groups attached to accountability.

     

    Lesson 1: Tell students that over the next few weeks they will be learning about astronomy, the study of outer space. Ask them if they have ever heard of outer space. If so, ask them what can be found in outer space beyond the Earth. State that they might be surprised to know that they see objects from outer space in the sky every day. Use a globe to emphasis the Earth being round, and rotating on an axis. Also, be sure to emphasis the Essential Background Information or Terms listed on p.12 of Domain 6's Teacher Guide. For this lesson's extension activity ensure that students' astronomy journals are created and ready for use.

  • Week 6: May 21

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    2-Part A

    2-Part B

    3-Part A

    3-Part B

    4-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will dive deeper into Domain 6, Astronomy. Ensure that you preview the materials required for lessons, and tie new learning to past content taught as often as possible.

     

    Lesson 2: Remind students that even though it is far away from the Earth and looks smaller, the Sun is actually much larger than the Earth and provides the Earth with light, heat, and energy. Using a flag or pin, mark the approximate location of your town on a globe. Tell students that this is where you live and emphasize that you live on the planet Earth, which is represented by the globe. Spin the globe to show students how the Earth rotates. Also, let students know that the Earth revolves around the Sun, place a hula hoop on the floor and begin walking around the hula hoop while holding and continuing to spin the globe. Tell students that this is what the Earth's orbit looks like. Feel free to use a clock when explaining the differences between AM and PM.

     

    Lesson 3: Before beginning the read aloud invite students to show you how Earth rotates and orbits. Because today's learning is about stars, remind students about the phases of matter and what gas is.

     

    Lesson 4: Before beginning the read aloud ask students to describe surprising facts they've learned about stars. Explain that all of these facts are known only because of the work of astronomers (scientists who study stars with the help of observatories and telescopes). Explain that in today’s read-aloud, students will take a step back in time thousands of years to ancient times, before astronomy had even begun, back to a time when people often told stories, or myths, to explain how natural events occurred. The horizontal word wall that you develop for this lesson's extension activity should be separate from the one you use for tricky and sight words.

  • Week 7: May 28

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    4-Part B

    5-Part A

    5-Part B

    PP

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will prepare for Domain 6's Pausing Point. Students will be assessed on content from Lessons 1-5.

     

    Lesson 5: Remind students that sometimes the way objects in outer space look or appear to us on Earth may lead us to draw conclusions that are not correct. Ask students to recall what they learned about ancient people's beliefs previously. This prompting should hopefully filter into a discussion about how the beliefs were incorrect and unfounded. Use as many students as possible when teaching the On Stage: Earth Moon Relay extension activity. This will help with engagement and keeping students on-task.

     

    Pausing Point: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

  • Week 8: June 4

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    6- Part A

    6-Part B

    7-Part A

    7-Part B

    8-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will begin to learn about astronauts and the solar system. Keep in mind the importance of reminding students of all of the content that they've learned throughout this domain so far. This can be done via visuals; image cards, comparison anchor charts,  illustrations, flip book images, etc.

     

    Lesson 6: Display and label the moon phase image cards to refer to during the pre-reading discussion. Before reading, you should also push students to define space exploration and astronaut (someone who is trained to travel in space). This lesson's extension activity encourages you to re-read a previous read aloud, instead of this, you can do a close read of a previous read aloud; only examining then dissecting for meaning a portion of a familiar text.

     

    Lesson 7:  Have students to recall previous content learned on space travel, the first astronauts, the Sun, stars, etc. before beginning the read aloud. Also, encourage students to make connections between the first astronauts and Christopher Columbus, as well as themselves. See pp. 93-4 of Domain 6's Teacher Guide, if you're in need of supporting questions to ask.

     

    Lesson 8: In this lesson students will begin to learn about planets. Before reading ask them to recall how planets and stars differ. Students should also recall that they've learned about a planet already, the Earth. While reading, you will have to complete a planet chart where you will fill in facts about every planet. See p.116  of Domain 6's Teacher Guide for guidance with this.

  • Week 9: June 11

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    8-Part B

    9-Part A

    9-Part B

    DR

    DA

    Assessment

    Domain Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will prepare for Domain 6's final assessment. Students will be assessed on content from Lessons 1-9.

     

    Lesson 9: Make sure that you're writing out the lyrics to the Solar System song, otherwise students will have difficulty singing along with you. Also, refer back to the text as well as the image cards and flip book images when filling out the planet chart with students. They should be assisting you with recalling facts on the various planets.

     

    Domain Review: You should spend this day reviewing and reinforcing the material from this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided in either whole-group or small-group settings. If the review activities are happening in small groups, the teacher should rotate between stations while students are rotating between centers to make sure they cover them all. Add a writing accountability piece to the image card review station.

     

    Domain Assessment: Feel free to pace out the assessment or conduct it in small groups while the remaining students are still reviewing. Part I is the vocabulary assessment, and Part II of the assessment address the core content targeted in the Astronomy domain.

Skills

  • Teacher Notes

    Notes:

    **Grade 1 Teachers: Please note that there will be an additional Skills lesson on Fridays beginning in Q4. The End of Year Skills Assessments must be completed and in order to fit in all of the lessons we will need to complete 60 minutes of Skills instruction on some Fridays. The remaining minutes of your literacy block can be used for small groups, remediation and enrichment, like it has been previously.**

     

    Notes to Teacher: Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smartboard, or writing the material on chart paper or a whiteboard.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Unit

    5

    Lesson

    6

    7

    8

    9

    Notes:

    Lesson 6: It is recommended that you place Worksheet 6.2 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. Today you will introduce an important spelling alternative for the /ch/ sound. Students should already know the basic code spelling ‘ch’ as in chin. In this lesson you will review that spelling and introduce the spelling alternative ‘tch’ as in itch.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘tch’ is almost never used at the beginning of a word or syllable; it is usually found after one of the “short” vowel sounds (batch, itch, etch, botch, Dutch).

    -‘ch’ is used in most other situations, including at the beginning of a word (chop, chain), in the final position after sounds other than the “short vowels” (beach, march, ouch, smooch), and in consonant clusters (lunch, pinch).

     

    Lesson 7: Today you will review two important spellings for the /g/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘g’ as in got, and the spelling alternative ‘gg’ as in egg.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘g’ is the most common spelling. It is used in most situations, including initial position (get, gift), final position (bug, bag), and in the initial consonant clusters gl– and gr– (glow, grow).

    -‘gg’ follows the same patterns as ‘pp’ and ‘bb’. It is never used at the beginning of a word. It is used in doubling situations (big > bigger) and after a “short” vowel sound in other multi-syllable words (dagger, snuggle, giggle).

     

    The sound /g/ (combined with the sound /z/) can also be represented by the letter ‘x’ in some words (exact, exaggerate).

     

    Lesson 8: It is recommended that you place Worksheet 8.1 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. Today you will create a new Spelling Tree to teach and review spelling alternatives for /j/. Assemble the Spelling Tree prior to the lesson. Be sure to preview the suggested template in the teacher's guide to ensure that the branches accommodate the various spellings and align with the power bar notion, the more common the spelling the longer the branch upon the tree.

     

    Lesson 9: Today students will work on decoding the tricky spelling ‘g’. This spelling poses a problem for readers because it can be pronounced /g/ (sometimes called hard ‘g’) or /j/ (sometimes called soft ‘g’). Hard g  /g/ is the more common pronunciation. If students come across an unfamiliar printed word containing the letter ‘g’, they should first try pronouncing the ‘g’ as /g/. If that does not sound like a word, or if the resulting word does not make sense in context, students should try /j/.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    The spelling ‘g’ is usually (not always) pronounced /g/ except when followed by the letters ‘e’, ‘i’, and ‘y’. Initial ‘g’ is almost always pronounced /g/ when it is part of an initial consonant cluster like gl– or gr– (glad, grab) and when it is at the beginning of a word and followed by the letters ‘a’, ‘o’, or ‘u’ (gang, gum, go). There are exceptions to this, like the words gift, get, give, girl.

     

    Final ‘g’ is almost always pronounced /g/ (big, rag, beg) unless it is part of the ‘ng’ spelling for /ng/ (song, king).

  • Week 2: April 23

    Unit

    5

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    13

    14

    Notes:

    Lesson 10: Today you will review the Spelling Trees /k/ and /j/. Write the following words on leaves to add to the Spelling Trees: hike, looked, coin, luck, raccoon, drumstick, gee, larger, legend, gel, barge, stagecoach. (Write this last word on two leaves because this word can be placed on both the /k/ and /j/ Trees.) You will also need to prepare the words listed on p.77 of Unit 5's Teacher Guide for the lesson's Baseball Game.

     

    Lesson 11: Today you will review all three of the important spellings for the /t/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘t’ as in top, the spelling alternatives ‘tt’ as in sitting, and ‘ed’ as in asked.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘t’ is the most common spelling. It is used at the beginning, middle, and end of words (top, blister, art), in the initial clusters tr–, tw–, st– (train, twin, stain), in the final clusters –st, –lt, –pt, –ct, –nt, –ft (bust, bolt, crept, fact, hunt, lift), and with separated digraphs (cute, note, bite, late).

    -‘tt’ is used in the same situations as ‘bb’ and ‘pp’. It is never used at the beginning of a word or syllable. It is rare in one-syllable words (mutt). It is used mostly in doubling situations (hot > hotter) and after a “short” vowel sound in other multi-syllable words (attic, better, lettuce).

    -‘ed’ pronounced /t/ is a past-tense marker used after the voiceless sounds /f/, /s/, /p/, /k/, /ch/, and /sh/ (dressed, hiked).

     

    Once the mouth is making a voiceless sound at the beginning of a consonant cluster, it becomes difficult to change to a voiced sound at the end. So the whole cluster tends to “go voiceless.” If English spelling were 100% phonetic, we would write drest instead of dressed. In words that contain separated digraphs, such as hiked and baked, the ‘e’ in the past-tense ending –ed can be seen as serving two functions. It is part of the separated digraph, and it is part of the past-tense marker.

     

    Lesson 12: Today you will review all three of the important spellings for the /d/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘d’ as in dot, the spelling alternatives ‘dd’ as in add, and ‘ed’ as in filled.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘d’ is the most common spelling; it is used in most cases, including initial position (dog), final position (mad), in the initial consonant clusters dr–and dw– (drip, dwarf), in the final consonant clusters –dth, –ld, and –nd (width, old, and), and with separated digraphs (made).

    -‘dd’ is used in the same situations as ‘tt’, ‘bb’, and ‘pp’. It is rare in one-syllable words and never occurs at the beginning of a word or syllable. It is used mostly in doubling situations (sad > sadder) and after a short vowel in other multi-syllable words (ladder, shudder, huddle).

    -‘ed’ is only used to spell the past-tense marker. It is pronounced /d/ after voiced consonants and vowel sounds. In words that contain separated digraphs, such as timed and zoned, the ‘e’ in the past-tense ending –ed can be seen as serving two functions. It is part of the separated digraph, and it is part of the past-tense marker.

     

    Lesson 13: Today you will review two of the important spellings for the /f/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘f’ as in fit, and the spelling alternative ‘ff’ as in stuff.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘f’ is the most common spelling. It is used in initial position (fun, fig), final position (leaf, deaf), in the initial consonant clusters fl– and fr– (flop, fresh), in the final consonant clusters –ft, –fth, and –If (lift, fifth, elf), and with separated digraphs (safe, life).

     

    Only ‘f’ is used at the beginning of words and syllables, but both spellings are used at the end of words or syllables.

     

    Lesson 14: It is recommended that you place Worksheet 14.1 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. Today you will introduce the only significant spelling alternative for the /v/ sound. Students should already know the basic code spelling ‘v’ as in van. In this lesson you will review that spelling and introduce the spelling alternative ‘ve’ as in twelve.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘v’ is used as a spelling for /v/ at the beginning of words and syllables (vet, vent); it is seldom found at the end of words (Kiev, Pavlov).

    -‘ve’ is used at the end of words (twelve, serve, carves).

     

    Many ‘ve’ words change to ‘v’ when suffixes are added (carve > carving).

    Assessment

    10-Spelling Assessment

  • Week 3: April 30

    Unit

    5

    Lesson

    15

    16

    17

    18

    Assessment

    15-Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 15: Today you will begin lessons on opinion writing. Please create an enlarged version of Worksheet 15.2 (“The Best Book Ever”) on chart paper or display it using a projector. Students will also need markers or highlighters for underlining key sentences in the example paragraph.

     

    Lesson 16: Please create enlarged versions of the writing process chart and the “Take a Stand and Tell Why” planning and drafting templates at the end of this lesson. In this lesson you will model planning and drafting an opinion paragraph, while students contribute orally. Think about class or school events in which students may have participated during the school year (e.g., field trips, classroom visits, celebrations, school assemblies, etc). You will help students plan a whole-class opinion paragraph about their favorite class or school event today. You will also need blank chart paper if you choose to record students’ ideas while planning as a class. You will also need to create a new Spelling Tree to teach and review spelling alternatives for /r/. Remember that the trunk of a Spelling Tree represents the specific sound under study, whereas the various branches and their respective leaves represent the different spellings for this sound and how common it is used in the English language. The Spelling Tree serves as a visual reminder that one sound can have more than one spelling.Refer to the directions and templates in Lesson 4 for further guidance in creating the new Spelling Tree. Assemble the Spelling Tree prior to the lesson.  It is recommended that you place Worksheet 16.2 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. Today you will introduce an important spelling alternative for the /r/ sound. The students should already know the basic code spelling ‘r’ as in red and the spelling alternative ‘rr’ as in ferret. In this lesson you will review those spellings and introduce the spelling alternative ‘wr’ as in wrist.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘wr’ is used in initial position only.

    -‘r’ is used in initial consonant clusters such as br–, cr–, dr–, fr–, gr–, pr–, spr–, tr–, shr–, and the– (brim, crab, drip, free, greed, pride, spring, tree, shrink, three).

    -‘rr’ always follows a vowel spelling. It follows ‘e’ in words like ferry and ‘a’ in words like marry. This spelling is reviewed in this lesson but not included in the word sort because the focus of this lesson is on spellings for /r/ that are used before a vowel sound.

     

    Lesson 17: For today’s Warm-Up activity, please write the following words on leaves: black, skip•er, crawled, hugged, gar•lic, camp•site, stack, socc•er, came, kick•ed, merge, col•ege. Today’s writing lesson calls for you to use the completed draft about the best class trip. This was written whole class during a previous lesson. You will also need to display the writing process chart again.

     

    Lesson 18: Select a student to be the author of the day from among the students who volunteered for the task when they placed a star next to the title of their draft. Before the lesson begins, please let that student know that he/she has been chosen to be the author of the day. Copy the student’s draft—including any errors—onto chart paper, skipping every other line to leave room for editing. You may wish to number the sentences using a different color ink. This will make it easier to refer to specific parts of the paragraph. The ideal draft will be one that is good but capable of improvement and, specifically, could be improved in one or more of the areas listed on the editing checklist (Worksheet 18.1). You will also need the Plan Draft Edit chart found at the end of Lesson 16 and blank chart paper.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Unit

    5

    6

    Lesson

    19

    22

    PP

    1

    Notes:

    Lesson 19: Today you will review the two important spellings for the /l/ sound: the basic code spelling ‘l’ as in lip, and the spelling alternative ‘ll’ as in bell.

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘I’ is almost always used at the beginning of a word (lip, long, load) and also in initial clusters such as bl–, cl–, fl–, gl–, pl–, sl–, and spl– (blimp, clip, flop, glide, play, sleep, split).

    -‘I’ is found at the end of words, after vowel sounds other than the five “short” vowel sounds (boil, wheel, tail, curl), or as part of a final consonant cluster such as –ld, –lf, –lm, –ln, –lp, –lt, –lch, –lsh, or –lth (cold, elf, elm, kiln, help, colt, belch, Welsh, wealth).

    -‘I’ is used with the separated digraph spellings (pale, file, hole).

    -‘II’ is primarily used at the end of a word or syllable, usually after one of the “short” vowel sounds (bill, sell, fall, doll, ill). A few exceptions include words like llama and Lloyd.

     

    Lesson 20: Omit

     

    Lesson 21: Omit

     

    Lesson 22: Today you will administer the Unit 5 assessment. The first assessment is a Word Recognition Assessment that targets the sound-spelling correspondences taught in Unit 5. The second part is a Grammar Assessment. Depending on the time, you may have students either reread stories from the reader, or read “The Scoop” as a class.

     

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 5. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 1: In this lesson you will be asked to create a Spelling Tree wall display for the /s/ consonant sound and the three spellings (‘s’, ‘ss’, and ‘c’) introduced in this lesson. Be sure to leave room for two additional spelling alternatives (‘se’ and ‘ce’) taught later in this unit. Templates to assist you in making the Spelling Tree are provided at the end of this lesson. You should have the Spelling Tree assembled and ready to be displayed before you begin the exercise, but do not attach any leaves prior to the lesson. Write these /s/ words on the leaves: sit, sun, snake, song, kiss, dress, cell, cent, pencil. Make multiple copies of the odd duck template on yellow paper. These duck-shaped cards are for odd ducks (i.e., words having the /s/ sound but not falling into any of the spelling patterns students are learning in Unit 6). You do not need to write any words in advance on the odd duck templates; just have these available during the lesson should students offer any odd duck spellings for the /s/ sound. Today and in the following lessons you will talk about three spellings for the /s/ sound, one of the trickiest consonant sounds to spell. Students should already know the basic code spelling ‘s’ as in sit and the spelling ‘ss’ as in dress. In today’s lesson you will review these spellings and introduce the spelling alternative ‘c’ as in cent. In following lessons you will introduce the spelling alternatives ‘se’ as in rinse and ‘ce’ as in prince.

    Assessment

    22- Word Recognition/Grammar Assessment

     

  • Week 5: May 14

    Unit

    6

    Lesson

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Notes:

    Lesson 2: For the writing section of this lesson, please create a large, blank version of “Tell a Tale of What Happened to You” (see page 23) on chart paper or as a transparency to use with students while planning a class personal narrative. Please also create a large version of the “Tell a Tale that Happened to You” chart exactly as it is produced on page 23. Today students will work on decoding the tricky spelling ‘c’. This spelling poses a problem for readers because it can be pronounced /k/ (sometimes called hard ‘c’) or /s/ (sometimes called soft ‘c’).

     

    Here are some patterns for you to be aware of:

    -‘c’ is likely to be pronounced /s/ when followed by ‘e’, ‘i’, or ‘y’ (cent, city, cypress).

    -‘c’ is likely to be pronounced /k/ when followed by ‘a’, ‘o’, or ‘u’ (cat, cot, cut), when part of a consonant cluster (clip, crop, scatter, fact), or when at the end of a word or syllable (picnic, mimic).

    -In ‘cc’ words, the first ‘c’ is often pronounced /k/ and the second one /s/ (accent, accept) but not always (accord, raccoon).

     

    Lesson 3: In this lesson you will use shared writing to give a model for how to write a personal narrative.  You will use the writing process chart and the 5W's sheet as tools, and the class plan you created in lesson 2.  Consider writing a personal narrative about something that happened to the class, such as a school assembly or visitor to the classroom, a school incentive party or visit from older reading buddies.

     

    Lesson 4: For the spelling work in this lesson it is recommended that you place Worksheet 4.1 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7.  You will also be adding to your Spelling Tree and will need some new words prepared. For writing, students will begin planning and drafting their own personal narrative, using the model the class created as a shared writing.

     

    Lesson 5: When you introduce the new s alternative words in this lesson, you will have students read the word and use it in a sentence. To engage more students in this learning, consider using T&T partners so half of the class can read the word and say a sentence for each one. When students work on their personal narratives, make sure they utilize their homework which was brainstorming ideas.  Before sending kids off to write, remind them of their resources (writing process chart and 5W's sheet) and consider playing soft working music.  During writing, circulate and confer with students.  At the end of writing time, you may want to use the Lemov strategy of Show Call to select 1-2 students drafts to project and highlight strengths and next steps.

    Assessment

    5-Spelling Assessment

  • Week 6: May 21

    Unit

    6

    Lesson

    7

    9

    10

    16

    Notes:

    Lesson 6: Omit

     

    Lesson 7: During the spelling portion of the lesson you will check students' understanding of s spellings by dictating words that they will spell. When you dictate the word and say it in a sentence, consider using student names in the sentences.  Then you will show students how to correct their own spelling by crossing out and writing the correct spelling next to it.  It's important to teach them this method instead of erasing so that you can see the type of error they made, and use it as a formative assessment of their spelling and phonics development.  This is a great time to build a "culture of error" where everyone knows that mistakes are helpful because we learn from them. During the writing portion of this lesson, students will work with partners to peer edit.  Select productive partners ahead of time, ideally partners that stay the same for a period of time so that they can learn to work together well. They will be asked to use post-it notes to give a praise and a push. Consider providing sentence frames to the class to help them think about a precise praise and a helpful push.

     

    Lesson 8: Omit

     

    Lesson 9: During the warm-up and the grammar sections consider using turn and talk partners to increase engagement and participation.  During the small group reading time work with a group that needs extra support from you (small group) while the rest of the class uses buddy/partner reading.

     

    Lesson 10: For this lesson you will need to build the /n/ Spelling Tree. When preparing for the small group reading, preview the words and phrases listed.  You may want to have an image ready to project if it will add clarity. After the reading with buddies or small groups, you will wrap up with a short conversation.  Consider calling on volunteers to answer the literal questions and using Think-Pair-Share or a discussion circle to answer the inferential questions. Always push students to explain their thinking with text evidence. Be ready to prompt them with "What in the text makes you think that?"

     

    Lessons 11-15: Omit

     

    Lesson 16: It is recommended that you place Worksheet 16.2 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. You will also be asked to create a Spelling Tree wall display for the /w/ consonant sound and its spellings (‘w’ and ‘wh’). Examples to assist you in making the Spelling Tree are provided for you on p.97 of your teacher's guide.

    Assessment

    10-Spelling Assessment

  • Week 7: May 28

    Unit

    6

    Notes:

    Lesson 17: Omit

     

    Lesson 18: It is recommended that you place Worksheet 18.1 in a page protector in students’ classroom folders. You will add other worksheets containing new consonant spellings to this page protector throughout the unit. If you do not have page protectors to use, please consider other ways to organize the worksheets that will allow students to reference them for Units 5–7. In this lesson you will be asked to create a Spelling Tree for the /ng/ consonant sound and its spellings (‘ng’ and ‘n’). Examples to assist you in making the Spelling Tree are provided for you on p.109 of your teacher's guide. During today's warm up activity you may want to draw a copy of the speech bubble with the /er/ sound on the board for use during the example problem so that students know what you mean when you say speech bubble.

     

    Lesson 19: Consider drawing the trick spelling "n" diagram on chart paper so that students have a reference point to look at later on.

     

    Lesson 20-22: Omit

     

    Lesson 23: Feel free to write down the words if students are having difficulties segmenting and blending during today's warm-up.

     

    Lesson 24: For today’s break, you will show students cards that have phrases on them that they will read and act out. These are called Wiggle Cards and they can be used any time students need a break. You will need to write the decodable phrases from p.140 of your teacher's guide on a card or sentence strips large enough for students to be able to easily read them.

    Lesson

    18

    19

    23

    24

    Assessment

    24-Word Recognition Assessment

  • Week 8: June 4

    Unit

    6

    7

    Notes:

    Lesson 25: Today's comprehension assessment should be completed independently. Keep in mind student code knowledge when conducting small groups, this should be based on data and/or your current scope and sequence.

     

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 6. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 1: Today you will introduce two spelling alternatives for the /ae/ sound. The students should already know the basic code spelling ‘a_e’ as in cake. In today’s lesson you will review this spelling and introduce the spelling alternatives ‘ai’ as in wait and ‘ay’ as in day. In this lesson you will be asked to create a Spelling Tree wall display for the / ae/ vowel sound and its spellings (the basic code ‘a_e’, and spelling alternatives ‘ai’ and ‘ay’ introduced in this unit). An example to assist you in making the Spelling Tree is provided for you on pp. 8-9 of your teacher's guide. For today’s break activity, you will show students cards that have phrases on them that they will read and act out (Wiggle Cards). You will need to write the decodable phrases from p.10 of your teacher's guide on a card, or sentence strips large enough for students to be able to easily read them.

     

    Lessons 2-10: Omit

     

    Lesson 11: Today you will introduce a spelling alternative for the /oe/ sound. The students should already know the basic code spelling ‘o_e’ as in rope. In today’s lesson you will review this spelling and introduce the spelling alternative ‘oa’ as in boat. In this lesson you will be asked to create a Spelling Tree for the / oe/ vowel sound and its spellings, reviewing the basic code ‘o_e’ and introducing the spelling alternative ‘oa.’ Examples to assist you in making the Spelling Tree are provided on pp.61-2 of your teacher's guide.

    Lesson

    25

    PP

    1

    11

    Assessment

    25-Story Comprehension Assessment

  • Week 9: June 11

    Unit

    7

    Lesson

    19

    20

    21

    Assessment

    19-Silent Reading Comprehension Assessment

     

    20-Fluency Assessment

     

    21-Word Reading Isolation Assessment

    Notes:

    Lessons 12-18: Omit

     

    Lesson 19: The Silent Reading Comprehension Assessment should be given to the whole class in one sitting. Ask students to tear out Worksheets 19.1 and 19.2. Allow students 30 minutes to silently read the story on Worksheet 19.1 and to answer the multiple-choice comprehension questions on Worksheet 19.2. Students should be allowed (and encouraged) to look back at the story as they answer the questions. Collect the worksheets after 30 minutes. (Ability to read the story and answer the questions within a certain length of time is part of the assessment). For today’s lesson you will need to write out the Wiggle Cards decodable phrases from p.104 of the teacher's guide.

     

    Lesson 20: The Fluency Assessment provides a more focused, one-on-one assessment for students who incorrectly answered two or more of the seven questions in the Silent Reading Comprehension Assessment. To administer this section of the assessment, you will pull students aside individually and ask each to read “Shark and Wee Fish” aloud to you. You should keep a running record during this reading and calculate a Words Correct Per Minute (W.C.P.M.) score using the provided guidelines. This will provide an indication of fluency. Record students’ scores (in both Oral Reading Comprehension and Fluency) on the End-of-Year Summary Sheet (Worksheet 19.3) for each student. While you are administering the one-on-one assessment, the other students may be rereading stories from their reader, writing instructional paragraphs, or completing activities and worksheets from the Pausing Point.

     

    Lesson 21: The Word Reading in Isolation Assessment is designed to assess a student’s ability to read words containing the spellings that were taught and reviewed in Grade 1. The emphasis in this assessment is solely on decoding accuracy. It would be ideal to give all students the Word Reading in Isolation Assessment, but if there is a time restriction, assess those students who scored less than 50 W.C.P.M. on the Fluency Assessment. The assessment sheet with words for students to read is at the end of this lesson and reprinted on Worksheet 21.1. Ask students to tear out Worksheet 21.2 for you to use as a running record and scoring sheet. Keep in mind that a single word will target multiple letter-sound correspondences. For example, the word write assesses the ‘wr’ spelling for /r/ and the ‘i_e’ spelling for /ie/. While you are administering the one-on-one assessment, students may be rereading stories from their readers, writing instructional paragraphs (or other types of writing genres they have learned this year), or completing activities and worksheets from the Pausing Point. If they have been keeping a writing portfolio, they can read their work from the year and select their favorite piece.