Q4 1st Grade Math Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 6: Place Value, Comparison, Addition and Subtraction to 100

In this final module of the Grade 1 curriculum, students bring together their learning from Module 1 through Module 5 to learn the most challenging Grade 1 standards and celebrate their progress. As the module opens, students grapple with comparative word problem types. Next, they extend their understanding of and skill with tens and ones to numbers to 100. Students also extend their learning from Module 4 to the numbers to 100 to add and subtract. At the start of the second half of Module 6, students are introduced to nickels and quarters, having already used pennies and dimes in the context of their work with numbers to 40 in Module 4. Students use their knowledge of tens and ones to explore decompositions of the values of coins. The module concludes with fun fluency festivities to celebrate a year's worth of learning

Topic A: Comparison Word Problems

Topic B: Numbers to 120

Topic C: Addition to 100 Using Place Value Understanding

Topic D: Varied Place Value Strategies for Addition to 100

Topic E: Coins and Their Values

Topic F: Varied Problem Types Within 20

Topic G: Culminating Experiences

 

Advanced Preparation:

  • Linking Cubes
  • 100 bead Rekenrek/20 bead Rekenrek
  • Dimes, Pennies, Nickels, Quarters and Dollar Coin (real or plastic)
  • Die
  • Two pocket folders, crayons, colored pencils or markers, 2 envelopes (per student)

 

1st Grade Book of Sprints

  • Module Tip Sheet for Parents

    These documents provide parents an opportunity to see what their children are learning in the current module including:

    • Standards
    • Key vocabulary
    • Example Problems
    • Pictorial Models
    • Ideas for how to can help children at home
    • Coherence of learning with past and future modules

    For guides in Spanish, go here.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Module

    6

    Topic

    A

    B

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic A

    1.OA.1

    Notes:

    Lesson 1

    Students work to compare with difference unknown problems using double tape diagrams.  For each problem, ask students to use the linking cubes with their partners to represent the story. Guide them through drawing the double tape diagrams.  Accept addition and subtraction equations as appropriate methods for solving.

     

    Lesson 2

    Students use double tape diagrams to solve compare with bigger or smaller unknown problems. Guide students with relating more than to addition and fewer than to subtraction.  If students struggle with modeling problems with numerals, encourage them to use linking cubes or drawings within their tape diagrams in addition to the numerals.

     

    Lesson 3

    Invite students who still need a concrete representation to use their ten-sticks and cubes to show two-digit numbers greater than 40, while others use quick ten drawings. MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students use their place value charts to record quantities as tens and ones. Support students with understanding what each digit represents in unit form (i.e. 6 tens) and as the value (i.e. 60).

  • Week 2: April 23

    Module

    6

    Topic

    B

     

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment:

    Biweekly #1: Lesson 5 Exit Ticket

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic B

    1.NBT.1

    1.NBT.2a

    1.NBT.2c

    1.NBT.3

    1.NBT.5

    Notes:

    Lesson 4

    Students recognize that numbers such as 67 can be interpreted as 6 tens 7 ones and that the units can be combined to find the total: 60 + 7 = 67. Circulate to ensure that students are decomposing numbers as tens and ones in their number bond during the teacher-directed time as well as during the partner game. Elicit a variety of addition sentences and more than statements for each number.

     

    Lesson 5

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students recognize that when looking at a number such as 62, they focus on the tens place when adding or subtracting 10 and on the ones place when adding or subtracting ones.  Include a problem that asks for 1 less than a number with 0 ones and a problem that asks for 1 more than a number with 9 ones.  Then prioritize the first two questions during the Student Debrief before assigning the Exit Ticket.  *Use this exit ticket to assess student ability to write and interpret two-digit numbers to 100.

     

    Lesson 6

    Students practice comparing numbers using the symbols >, =, and <. Consider creating, posting and referring to an anchor chart that provides a visual reminder of the meaning of each symbol.  Additionally, as students compare numbers in various unit form combinations such as 7 tens 5 ones, 5 ones 7 tens, and 6 tens 15 ones, guide students to articulate how they determined their comparisons using place value understanding.

     

    Lesson 7

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students use Hide Zero Cards to build numbers from 100 to 120.  Though the use of the cards is optional, they allow students to relate the value of each digit as they write numbers to continue the counting sequence beyond 100.

  • Week 3: April 30

    Module

    6

    Topic

    B

    C

     

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10

    11

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic B

    1.NBT.1

    1.NBT.2a

    1.NBT.2c

    1.NBT.3

    1.NBT.5

    Topic C

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.6

    Notes:

    Lesson 8

    The use of the 100-bead and 20-bead Rekenreks in this lesson provide the visual support for students as they identify numbers through 120 as tens and ones or in unit form.  If not available, modify with ten sticks made with unifix cubes or quick tens. Support students with relating the traditional form and unit form of given numbers.

     

    Lesson 9

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students are guided to recognize how organizing the ten sticks into familiar patterns make counting easier.  Continue to represent the numbers as tens and ones on a place value chart for students who struggle with writing the traditional form.

     

    NOTE: Use Exit Ticket from Topic C to determine if lessons can be omitted or consolidated.

     

    Lesson 10

    Invite students to use math drawings, number bonds, and number sentences to add and subtract multiples of tens.  Provide concrete manipulatives for students if necessary.  Guide students to notice the relationship between problems presented in unit form and those that show the value of the units.

     

    Lesson 11

    MP.3, construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students are invited to share their solution strategies for adding multiples of 10 to two-digit numbers within 100.   Be sure to model a consistent method for solving to avoid overwhelming students who struggle.  It may also be helpful to capture solution strategies on an anchor chart that can be referenced as students work independently on the Problem Set and Exit Ticket.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Module

    6

    Topic

    C

     

    Lesson

    12

    13

    14

    15

    Assessment:

    Bi-Weekly #2: Lesson 14 Exit Ticket

    Notes:

    Lesson 12

    Choose the appropriate set of problems based on students' needs from the three sets given in the lesson. MP.5, use appropriate tools strategically, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students add a pair of two-digit numbers when the ones digits have a sum less than or equal to 10.   Ideally, students work independently guided by teacher questions that will prompt them to choose and use strategies that they've learned this year.  There is a suggested teacher student dialogue included if a more guided approach is needed.

     

    Lesson 13

    Similarly to Lesson 12, choose the appropriate set of problems based on students' needs.  MP.5, use appropriate tools strategically, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students add a pair of two-digit numbers.  Should students need additional support, follow the teacher-student dialogue. If not, encourage students to use place value language to reason about their solution methods.

     

    Lesson 14

    Similar to the last two lessons, Lesson 14 provides opportunities for students to practice solving two-digit addition problems.  Consider how the problems move from simple to complex when choosing the set that is appropriate for your students.  Invite students to use place value language to explain why they chose to solve using these methods.  *Use the exit ticket to assess student ability to choose a strategy for solving two-digit addition problems.

     

    Lesson 15

    This lesson previews the vertical method that 2nd grade students use to solve two-digit addition problems.  Facilitate the transition from using ten-sticks and cubes to using drawings to more distinctly separate and add tens with tens and ones with ones vertically, recording the total below the drawings.

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic C

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.6

  • Week 5: May 14

    Module

    6

    Topic

    C

    D

     

    Lesson

    16

    17

    18

    19

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic C

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.6

    Topic D

    1.NBT.4

    Notes:

    Lesson 16

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the concept development as students relate drawings of quick tens and ones to numbers when adding two-digit numbers.  Invite students to model and explain with quick tens, while the teacher relates every step to recording using just numbers.  After several problems, switch roles so that the students represent the drawings with just numbers. When students seem ready, encourage them to make the quick ten drawings and represent them with just numbers side by side as they'll do in the Problem Set.

     

    Lesson 17

    Choose the appropriate set of problems based on students' needs.  If students struggled with the Problem Set and/or Exit Ticket from Lesson 16, use a similar teaching sequence from Lesson 16 to guide instruction.  Ask students to model using quick ten drawings and relate every step to recording with numbers in a place value chart.  Then invite students to solve by using quick ten drawings as well as the standard algorithm with you before releasing them to do the work independently.

     

    Lesson 18

    MP.3, construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, is highlighted as students are asked to examine sample student work and prove whether different methods could arrive at the same correct solution. Students are then asked to look for and correct an error from another sample student work.   Guide students to recognize that they can achieve the same accurate sum through the varied strategies and that it's a good habit to work carefully and check over their own solution strategies.

     

    Lesson 19

    MP.5, use appropriate tools strategically, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students are asked to share and explain their preferred strategies for solving addition problems with two-digit numbers.

  • Week 6: May 21

    Module

    6

    Topic

    E

     

    Lesson

    20

    21

    Assessment:

    Mid-Module Assessment

    Administer after Lesson 19

    Biweekly #3

    *Lesson 20 Exit Ticket

    Notes:

    Administer the Mid-Module Assessment fir this week. After administering and scoring the assessment, consider utilizing one day for remediation or further application.

     

    In Topic E, students learn about the penny, the nickel, the dime, and the quarter. Students identify and use the coins based on their image, name, or value.  Consider embedding instruction throughout the instructional day to offer additional practice with 1.MD.3.

     

    Lesson 20

    If students struggle to generate combinations of coins for the given value, guide them through trading pennies for a nickel or a dime.  Encourage students to also use their background with number bonds to decompose the larger value into the various compositions (i.e. if I know that 11 is 10 and 1, then I can relate that to a dime and a penny). If time permits, partners may play Coin Trade. This game will be revisited in Lesson 22. *Use this exit ticket to assess students' understanding of the value of pennies, nickels and dimes.

     

    Lesson 21

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students are asked to organize 25 pennies into 5-groups and consider making fair trades to create various compositions using pennies, nickels and dimes. The optional partner activity, 25 Cents, is revisited in Lesson 22.

     

     

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic E

    1.MD.3

    Standards in Assessment

    Mid-Module:

    1.OA.1

    1.NBT.1

    1.NBT.2a

    1.NBT.2c

    1.NBT.3

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.5

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.6

  • Week 7: May 28

    Module

    6

    Topic

    E

     

    Lesson

    22

    23

    24

    Notes:

    Lesson 22

    MP. 4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the first part of the Concept Development as students are asked to use addition to relate to finding the total value of simple coin combinations.  Based on students’ ability to identify the name, value, and image of each coin, choose one of the games played during the previous two lessons. To practice coin values of the dime, nickel, and penny, play Coin Trade. To practice adding on coins as well as trading coins, play 25 Cents.

     

    Lesson 23

    Encourage students to organize their pennies into 5-groups and discuss how doing so helps students know the total amount of pennies without counting.  Guide students to arrange and count on from any coin to create various values. If time permits, have partners play First to 50 Cents (a version of Coin Exchange).

     

    Lesson 24

    MP.4, model with mathematics, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students relate dimes and pennies to tens and ones shown on a place value chart.  Some of the suggested examples of sequences for coins include >10 pennies.  In these examples, encourage students to think about how they can compose a ten/dime before representing on the place value chart.

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic E

    1.MD.3

  • Week 8: June 4

    Module

    6

    Topic

    F

     

    Lesson

    25

    26

    27

    Notes:

    Lesson 25

    MP.1, make sense of problems and persevere in solving them, is highlighted in the Concept Development. Give students the opportunity to make sense of problems on their own before intervening.  Suggest that students think about the RDW strategy and ask themselves what can they draw to represent each problem.  Their drawings could be circle representations for the objects and then rectangles around the circles to create the tape diagrams.

     

    Lesson 26

    MP.1, make sense of problems and persevere in solving them, is highlighted in the Concept Development as students are provided more time to practice the various problem types.  Follow the Suggested Delivery of Instruction for Solving Word Problems.

     

    Lesson 27

    MP.3, construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, is highlighted as students discuss their methods for solving the problems and explain their work. Follow the Suggested Delivery of Instruction for Sharing and Critiquing Peer Strategies and invite students to make comments and suggestions and ask each other questions.

    Assessment:

    End-of-Module Assessment

    Administer after Lesson 27

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic F

    1.OA.1

    Standards in Assessment

    End-of-Module:

    1.OA.1

    1.MD.3

    1.NBT.1

    1.NBT.2a

    1.NBT.2c

    1.NBT.3

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.5

    1.NBT.4

    1.NBT.6

  • Week 9: June 11

    Module

    6

    Topic

    G

     

    Lesson

    28

    29

    30

    Standards Addressed in Lessons

    Topic F

    1.OA.1

    Notes:

    Use the additional day this week to provide remediation or further application from EOM.

     

    Lesson 28

    In Lesson 28, students revisit some of their favorite fluency activities from the year to celebrate and reflect on their progress. All of the games are played with materials that students can find at home or bring home from school to encourage engaging summer practice.

     

    Lesson 29

    This lesson is a continuation of review fluency activities from Lesson 28. See note above.

     

    Lesson 30

    Facilitate a conversation with students about the important concepts they have learned throughout Grade 1.  Encourage them to creatively represent their learning on a two-pocket folder that will store their Summer Packet.