Q1 10th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 1:

Reading Closely and Writing to Analyze: How Do Authors Develop Complex Characters and Ideas?

 

Module 1 Unit Texts

 

Unit 1: “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” by Sir Walter Raleigh, and “Raleigh Was Right” by William Carlos Williams

 

During this unit, students will dive deep into central idea by reading the poems and analyzing how the central ideas are shaped and refined. Students will begin to look closely at tone and the effect of word choice on meaning and tone. Additionally, since there are three poems, students will be drawing connections between the texts both with the structural choices the author makes as well as the meaning of the poems.

 

Unit 2: “The Palace Thief” from The Palace Thief by Ethan Canin.

 

Students will build on the previous unit and continue their work in analyzing how an author develops a central idea. Students will also begin to focus on the development of complex characters and ultimately how these characters help develop the central idea of the text.

  • Week 1: September 4

    Lesson

    Unit 1

    1

    2

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.4

    RL 9-10.5

    L.9-10.4a

    Notes:

    First two days have not been paced as they should be used to establish the various classroom routines and procedures needed. Think through general classroom expectations as well as routines that are specific to engage that should also be taught.

    Lesson 1: Read lines 1-8 (Title + first 2 stanzas) of The Passionate Shepherd to His Love. Students need to be able to identify the central idea that begins to emerge in this poem.

    Lesson 2: Continue reading the poem and read stanzas 3-6. Students are still working on central idea and are thinking specifically about how the time and place evoked in the poem help to develop the central idea.

  • Week 2: September 11

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.4

    RL 9-10. 5

    RL 9-10.9

    SL 9-10.1

    W 9-10.2d

    W 9-10.2b

    W 9-10.9

    Notes:

    Lesson 3: Reading all of The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd. Students are focusing specifically on the diction of the poem and how it impacts the tone and the meaning of the poem.

    SKIP LESSON 4

    Lesson 5: Reading the third poem, Raleigh Was Right. Students will get more practice with identifying central idea and how it develops.

    Lesson 6: Students should begin to work on the End of the Unit Assessment: How does a shared central idea develop over the course of the three poems from this unit? By the end of this day, students should have 1. identified the central idea that is common in all 3 poems 2. gathered at least one piece of evidence from each poem that supports the development of the central idea

    Lesson 7: Students should write their multi-paragraph essay that responds to the prompt. Focus should be on having 3 well-written paragraphs with strong evidence that shows that how each poems develops the shared central idea.

  • Week 3: September 18

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.3

    RL 9-10.4

    W 9-10.9

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: pp. 155-160-- during this section of reading, students should be paying close attention to the development of the characters, specifically the narrator, in the text and the characters that are being introduced relationship with one another.

    Lesson 2: pp. 160-164-- students are still focusing on character. They are analyzing how the relationship between the narrator and Sedgewick Bell develops over the course of the text. They want to focus on how the narrator's interaction with the senator (Sedgewick's father) ultimately changes the way he feels about and thinks about Sedgewick.

    Lesson 3: pp. 164-168-- this part of reading is focused on how a central idea is developed and how characters help to develop central ideas. They are analyzing the narrator's actions during the Julius Caesar competition that takes place and how it helps to develop one of the central ideas (fulfilling expectations) of the text.

    Lesson 4: pp. 168-171-- students continue to grapple with how the events that take place during the Julius Caesar competition help to shape a central idea of the text. Students should specifically be analyzing the conflict experienced by the narrator during this part of reading.

  • Week 4: September 25

    Lesson

    Unit 2

    5

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.3

    RL 9-10.4

    L.9-10.5

    W 9-10.2

    W 9-10.9

    Notes:

    Lesson 5:  pp. 171- 175-- students are continuing to look at character development, both Hundert and Sedgewick. In addition, they are also reading the text closely to identify how word choice impacts the tone and meaning.

    Lesson 6 (part 1):  pp. 175-179-- there are several conflicts that emerge during this part of the text. Students need to be able to identify and explain these conflicts and then ultimately connect the development of the conflict to the development of the central idea.  Have students complete the during reading questions but not yet the quick write.

    Lesson 6 (part 2):  pp. 179-182 Finish the reading from this lesson, any during reading questions that pertain to this section or the section as a whole, and the quick write.

    Lesson 7: DAY ONE: Spend three days on this so students have enough time to complete the mid unit assessment. Consider creating some sort of graphic organizer or outline template for students to complete on day 1, give them feedback, and then have them write or type the paper on day two and three. If time allows, another round of revisions could be beneficial for students. Students are responding to the following prompt: How has Hundert developed over the course of the text thus far? Essays should include an introductory paragraph and then the body paragraphs. Use and adapt the rubrics and checklists provided in the lesson.

  • Week 5: October 2

    Lesson

    Unit 2

    7

    8

    9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.3

    Notes:

    Lesson 7: DAYS TWO AND THREE: Spend three days on this so students have enough time to complete the mid unit assessment. Consider creating some sort of graphic organizer or outline template for students to complete on day 1, give them feedback, and then have them write or type the paper on day two and three. If time allows, another round of revisions could be beneficial for students. Students are responding to the following prompt: How has Hundert developed over the course of the text thus far? Essays should include an introductory paragraph and then the body paragraphs. Use and adapt the rubrics and checklists provided in the lesson.

    Lesson 8: pp. 182-187 -- students are again analyzing character. They are looking at Hundert's reaction to his retirement and seeing how that further develops his character. Since students have just finished the mid-unit assessment they should have a firm grasp of his character and can analyze how this event is further developing the complex character.

    Lesson 9: pp. 187- 191-- in this section there is a second Julius Caesar competition. Students will closely read and annotate for the interactions between Hundert and his former students. They will then explain how this reunion and the various interactions with his former students helps to develop a central idea (identity) in the text.

  • Week 6: October 10

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.3

    RL 9-10.4

    SL 9-10.4

    SL 9-10.1

    Notes:

    Lesson 10:  pp. 191- 195 -- Start off by explaining the line "Man's character is his fate." Then as students are reading they want to focus on if Hundert is demonstrating the meaning of this quote.

    Lesson 11:  pp. 195-198 -- Back to central idea. Hundert has realized that Sedgewick has again cheated. Students are focusing on how this realization and the aftermath of the competition helps to further develop one of the central ideas (identity or expectations) of the text.

    Lesson 12 (day 1):  pp. 198-201 -- This lesson can be split into 2 days. The first day students should read pages 198-201 and do the engage during reading questions that are there.

     

  • Week 7: October 16

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.1

    RL 9-10.3

    RL 9-10.2

    L.9-10.1

    W.9-10.2

    Notes:

    Lesson 12 (day 2):  pp. 201-205-- should continue with the reading and lesson from the previous day. Now that students have finished the text they can answer the quick write question assessing how Hundert has changed throughout the course of the text.

    Lesson 13 (two - three days):  Students should complete the end of unit assessment: Analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea in “The Palace Thief. Students are writing a multi-paragraph essay that should include an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Take 2 days to complete the essay.

    Lesson 13 (two -three days):  Students should complete the end of unit assessment: Analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea in “The Palace Thief. Students are writing a multi-paragraph essay that should include an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Take 2 days to complete the essay.

  • Week 8: October 23

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.1

    RI 9-10.2

    RI 9-10.3

    RI 9-10.6

    L. 9-10.1a

    L.9-10.2a

    SL 9-10.1

    Notes:

    For unit 3, only do one of the short stories. The recommended one is an excerpt from  Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger.

    Lesson 10: pp. 73-76 of Dreaming of Heroes. Students are continuing to look at character and central idea. They are examining the football star's relationship with his father  help to shape a central idea of the text. There are common central ideas between this text and Palace Thief. Students should begin to make these connections as this will help with the performance task.

    Lesson 11: pp. 77- 79 of Dreaming of Heroes. It is important that students are able to understand that there is a narrator outside of the story. The story is written in third person so the narrator has a different point of view than any of the characters in the text. Students should use the direct and indirect reporting tool to begin to separate the narrators' agenda and feelings vs. those of a character. Students need to analyze how the information that the narrator chooses to include helps to shape his point of view.

    Lesson 12: pp. 79- 84 of Dreaming of Heroes. Students are looking now at the relationship between Don and Charlie and examining how this relationship further helps to shape the central idea of expectations or identity (give students the central identity if necessary as a scaffold)

    Lesson 13: pp. 84-88 of Dreaming of Heroes. Students are focusing in on the description of the final events of the  season opener and how this shaped one of the three central ideas (tradition, expectations, identity) that students have been working with this module. There is an action/reaction tool included in this lesson that can help students structure their analysis.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Lesson

    Performance Task

    Notes:

    During this week, students should spend the four days completing the Module Performance Assessment.

    How do two of the narrators’ (from the 5 texts read) different points of view impact the development of a common central idea?