Q1 10th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 16-17

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

 

Module 1:

Reading Closely and Writing to Analyze: How Do Authors Develop Complex Characters and Ideas?

 

Module 1 Unit Texts

 

Unit 1: “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” by Sir Walter Raleigh, and “Raleigh Was Right” by William Carlos Williams

 

Unit 2: “The Palace Thief” by Ethan Canin

 

Unit 3: “Rules of the Game” and “Two Kinds” from The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan and “Dreaming of Heroes” from Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger

 

Note: Some lessons, texts and assessments have been omitted for pacing purposes.

  • Week 1: September 6

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.1

    W.9-10.9.a

    W.9-10.2.d

    L.9-10.6

    L.9-10.5

    Notes:

    *Lesson 5 has been removed for pacing purposes.

    *The unit assessment will only focus on two poems instead of three.

    *Teachers should also remove the in-depth dive into standards noted at the beginning of the unit.

    *Only 3 lessons have been included in week one to accommodate for it being the first week of school.

     

    Lessons 1-  In this lesson, students read the first two stanzas of Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love”.  Students listen to a masterful reading of the poem in its entirety, and review and practice their annotation skills. Students then analyze the title and first two stanzas of the poem, considering how Marlowe introduces a central idea of his poem.

     

    Lesson 2 - Students read stanzas 3–6 of the poem. Students analyze the shepherd’s promises to his love, focusing on the cumulative impact of Marlowe’s pastoral imagery on the meaning and tone of his poem.

     

    Lesson 3 - Students read Raleigh's poem in its entirety and analyze Raleigh’s word choices and how they affect the meaning and tone of the poem.

     

  • Week 2: September 12

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    L.9-10.5.a

    W.9-10.2.b

    RL.9-10.9

    W.9-10.2.b,d

    Notes:

    Lesson 4 -  Students develop an understanding of the relationship between the central ideas of these two poems in preparation for the End-of-Unit Assessment as they discuss the texts both in small groups and as a whole class.

     

    Lesson 5: Removed.

     

    Lesson 6: In this lesson, students work in small groups to explore the relationship among the two poems as they complete an Evidence Collection Tool. Students develop their speaking and listening skills by participating in a jigsaw discussion about the following prompts: How does a shared central idea develop over the course of the three poems from this unit? How does each poet introduce and develop a central idea?

     

    Lesson 7: In this final lesson of the unit, the 10.1.1 End-of-Unit Assessment, students use their analysis of the two poems to craft a formal multi-paragraph response to the following prompt: How does a shared central idea develop over the course of the poems from this unit? Using the poems as well as their tools, notes, annotations, and lesson Quick Writes, students write responses using relevant and sufficient evidence to support their analysis.

     

  • Week 3: September 19

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    CCRA.R.6

    W.9-10.4

    L.9-10.4.a

    W.9-10.9.a

    Notes:

    *The Mid Unit Assessment (Lesson 7) has been removed for pacing reasons

     

    Lesson 1 Students are introduced to a new text, “The Palace Thief." Students continue to build the reading skills they began in 10.1.1 as they read and analyze pages 155–160 of “The Palace Thief.” Students pay particular attention to how Canin introduces the character of the narrator, Hundert, and explore how the narrator’s first impressions of Sedgewick develop the complex relationship between teacher and student.

     

    Lesson 2: Next, students read and discuss pages 160–164 in which the narrator confronts Sedgewick Bell about his behavior.  Consider how the relationship between the narrator and Sedgewick develops over the course of this passage.

     

    Lesson 3: Students read and discuss pages 164–168 of “The Palace Thief,” in which the narrator reflects on the events of the “Mr. Julius Caesar” competition. Students explore how the decisions that the narrator makes before and during the competition contribute to the development of a central idea in the text.

     

    Lesson 4: Next, Students read and discuss pages 168–171 in which the narrator, Hundert, struggles to understand the events of the competition and how best to move forward in its aftermath. Students analyze the conflict the narrator experiences, and explore how this conflict develops central ideas in the text.

     

  • Week 4: September 26

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    5

    6

    8

    9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.5.a

    W.9-10.2.a

    W.9-10.4

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2.c

    Notes:

     

    Lesson 5: In this lesson, students read and analyze pages 171–175. . Students analyze how the characters of Sedgewick and Hundert develop, and consider the impact of figurative language and word choice on the meaning and tone of the text. Lesson 6: Next, students read and analyze pages 175–182  in which Hundert describes the events following Sedgewick’s graduation, including the rise and fall of both St. Benedict’s and his career. Students analyze how the conflicts present in this focus excerpt develop a central idea in the text.

     

    Lesson 7: Removed

     

    Lesson 8: In this lesson, students read and discuss pages 182–187  in which Hundert enters retirement and agrees to facilitate a rematch of the competition. Students analyze how Hundert’s reaction to his retirement develops his character. Lesson 9: Next, students read and analyze pages 187–191 of in which Hundert describes the events leading up to the second competition. Students analyze how the interactions between Hundert and his former students develop central ideas in the text. Students focus their analysis on Hundert’s reflections on his role in his students’ lives, as well as his exchange with Martin Blythe.

     

  • Week 5: October 3

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.5

    L.9-10.4.a

    SL.9-10.1.a, c

    Notes:

     

    Lesson 10: In this lesson, students read pages 191–195  in which the reunion competition takes place. Students participate in a jigsaw discussion in which they compare the original and reunion “Mr. Julius Caesar” competitions and consider what this comparison suggests about Hundert’s character.

     

    Lesson 11:  Next, students discuss and analyze pages 195–198. In this passage, Hundert details the aftermath of the “Mr. Julius Caesar” reunion competition and his discovery that Sedgewick has once again cheated. Students analyze how the excerpt develops the central ideas of identity, expectations, and the importance of history.

     

    Lesson 12: Next, students read and discuss the final excerpt, pages 198–205.  In this section of text, Hundert attends one of Sedgewick Bell’s political rallies and shares an afternoon with his former student, Deepak Mehta. Students analyze Hundert’s character development by exploring his descriptions of his interactions with his former students.

     

    *An extra day is given for students to prepare for the End of Unit Assessment (Lesson 13) the following week.

     

  • Week 6: October 11

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    13

    1

    2

    3

    Notes:

     

    Lesson 13:  In this final lesson of the unit, the 10.1.2 End-of-Unit Assessment, students craft a formal multi-paragraph response to the following prompt: Analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea. Using the text, as well as their tools, notes, annotations, and lesson Quick Writes, students support their analysis with relevant and sufficient evidence.

     

    *Chapter 2 of Joy Luck Club, "Two Kinds" or Lessons 5,6,7,and 8 have been removed for pacing.

    *Chapter 9 (Mid Unit Assessment) has been removed for pacing

     

    Lesson 1: In this first lesson of the unit, students begin their exploration of “Rules of the Game,” the first of two chapters that students will read and analyze from Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club. Students read the first three paragraphs of “Rules of the Game” on page 89.

     

    Lesson 2: Then, students read pages 89–93 of “Rules of the Game”. Students participate in a collaborative discussion to explore how Tan develops a central idea through Waverly’s descriptions of her neighborhood and her interactions with the characters in it.

     

    Lesson 3: In this lesson, students read pages 93–98 of “Rules of the Game." Students consider how Waverly’s description of her blossoming chess career develops the central idea of expectations.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.2.c

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.a

    W.9-10.2.f

    W.9-10.9.a

    SL.9-10.1.a, d

  • Week 7: October 17

    Module

    1

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    4

    10

    11

    12

    Notes:

     

    Lesson 4: Next, students complete their reading of “Rules of the Game”  with pages 98–101. Students consider what Waverly’s interactions with her mother suggest about the relationship between the two characters.

     

    Lessons 10: In this lesson, students begin their analysis of an excerpt of H. G. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights. Students read pages 73–76 of the chapter “Dreaming of Heroes,”  Students analyze how Bissinger constructs Mike's relationship to his father Billy, as well as the community of Odessa, and how these relationships develop central ideas in the text.

     

    Lesson 11: Next, in this lesson, students read pages 77–79 of “Dreaming of Heroes” from Friday Night Lights.  Students work in small groups to read and analyze the text before working with the Direct and Indirect Reporting Tool, on which students track when Bissinger uses the actual words of the characters and when he reconstructs events, conversations, and emotions in order to advance his own point of view.

     

    Lesson 12: Students read pages 79–84 of “Dreaming of Heroes".  Students explore how Bissinger’s description of this relationship develops the central ideas of expectations and identity.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.5

    CCRA.R.6

  • Week 8: October 24

    Module

    1

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    13

    14

    Notes:

    *Additional time is given this week for students to prepare for the upcoming End of Unit Assessment

     

    Lesson 13: In this final lesson before the 10.1.3 End-of-Unit Assessment, students read pages 84–88 of “Dreaming of Heroes”.Students use the Season Opener: Actions and Reactions Tool to structure their analysis of the actions of key players in the season opener. Students then draw upon their work with the tool to discuss in groups how the events of the season opener develop the central ideas of identity, expectations, and tradition.

     

    Lesson 14:In this final lesson of the unit, students complete the 10.1.3 End-of-Unit Assessment. The 10.1.3 End-of-Unit Assessment assesses students’ cumulative understanding of two chapters from Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club and a chapter from H. G. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights, as students explore how central ideas develop in each text. Students craft a formal multi-paragraph response to the 10.1.3 End-of-Unit Assessment prompt: Respond to the following prompt using evidence from “Dreaming of Heroes” from Friday Night Lights and either “Rules of the Game”  from The Joy Luck Club:  How do the relationships between children and their parents develop a central idea common to these two texts?

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.1.b

    L.9-10.1.a

  • Week 9: October 31

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.9-10.9.b

    SL.9-10.1.d

    L.9-10.3

    L.9-10.4.a

    RI.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2.a

    L.9-10.5

    SL.9-10.1.a,e

    Notes:

    *More time is given this week for students to prepare for the Performance Assessment

     

    In this three-lesson Performance Assessment, students analyze how the unique perspectives of the different narrators of the Module 10.1 texts influence the development of central ideas, such as identity, expectations, tradition, and the relationship between humans and nature. Students discuss, organize, compose, and revise a multi-paragraph response to the following prompt: How do the two narrators’ different points of view impact the development of a common central idea?

     

    In Lesson 1, students complete a carousel activity in small groups to review the development of central ideas and the unique perspectives of the narrators in each of the module texts. Once they complete this activity, students select a central idea and two texts upon which to focus their written responses.

     

    In Lesson 2, students form discussion groups with other students who selected the same central idea and discuss, in their groups, how the perspectives of the narrators of their selected texts influence the development of this central idea. Students then independently draft an initial claim in response to the Performance Assessment prompt, and collect and organize evidence in support of this claim.

     

    In Lesson 3, students independently write a multi-paragraph response to the Performance Assessment prompt using evidence from two of the module texts to support their analysis.