Q2 10th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 16-17

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

Module 2:  "These are strange times, my dear"

 

Module 2 Theme/Central Ideas: Some themes in this module revolve around the ideas of freedom, justice, silence and trauma. Students will be reading several poems and informational texts that focus on how authors use rhetoric and word choice to develop ideas and claims about various human rights issues. There is a big focus on how the authors develop the arguments with claims, evidence, and reasoning.

 

Module 2 Unit 1 Texts: "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr. , "In this Blind Alley" by Ahmad Shamlu , "Freedom" by Rabindranath Tagore , "Women" by Alice Walker

 

Module 2 Unit 2 Texts: "A Genetics of Justice" by Julia Alvarez, "Remembering to Never Forget: Dominican Republic's 'Parsley Massacre'" by Mark Memmott

 

Module 2 Unit 3 Texts: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, "On the Adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights" by Eleanor Roosevelt, "Address to the United Nations Youth Assembly" by Malala Yousafzai

 

Things to note: In the texts in this module, there are several central ideas and claims. Students will need to use the graphic organizers to stay organized and to track their ideas while reading the texts as well as when comparing texts. Students will need materials from day to day lessons to complete middle and end of unit assessments as well as the performance task. Consider creating a journal or some sort of organizer that stays in the room that students will have this material easily accessible. Integrate some of the protocols suggested from Expeditionary Learning to increase engagement and build in habits of discussion.

  • Week 1: November 7

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.3

    RI 9-10.4

    RI 9-10.5

    RI 9-10.8

    SL 9-10.1.a

    SL 9-10.1.c

    SL 9-10.1.e

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.5

    W.9-10.9.b

    Weekly Notes

    Make sure to number the paragraphs of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" prior to distributing copies to students.

    Lesson 1 of the unit will be a masterful read of Letter from Birmingham Jail with stopping points for students to record their initial reactions. To increase engagement, as a hook, you could show a media clip or some current, relevant quotes/news clippings dealing with the Black Lives Matter movement so that students can make the connection between the racial climate during MLK's time and the racial climate today. At the end of the lesson, spend some time close reading paragraph 1 and looking for specific words that contribute to the impact of King's opening.

    Combine Lessons 2 and 3 where students are analyzing paragraphs 2-9. For paragraphs 2-5, students should be annotating for why King is in Birmingham and then identifying his claim in paragraph 6 and searching for the evidence that supports that claim in paragraphs 7-9.

  • Week 2: November 14

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    5 / 7

    6

    8

    9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.5

    RI 9-10.6

    RI 9-10.8

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.4

    RL 9-10.6

    L.9-10.1.a

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.5

    Weekly Notes

    Omit Lesson 4.

    Combine Lessons 5 and 7:

    Explain the argument delineation tool to students. For the culminating quick write, students can choose to identify the specific claims and assess the quality of evidence provided from paragraphs 10-11 or from paragraphs 12-15. Either way, students should be annotating for claims and evidence during this portion of the close read.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Students read and analyze the poem "In this Blind Alley". Students will be paying close attention to specific word choice in the poem and how this word choice develops a central idea. Teachers may need to review the definition of connotation as well as some types of figurative language. Students will have to identify a central idea that is common in both "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and "In this Blind Alley". Prior to releasing students for the quick write, ensure that students have successfully identified a shared central idea between the two poems. Then students can independently find the specific words/phrases in the texts that help develop the central idea.

     

    Lesson 7:

    During this lesson, you want students to really hone in on author's purpose and how he is using rhetoric to advance this purpose. Review the rhetorical impact tracking tool with students. Define/review the various rhetorical devices with students so that they know what they are looking for and how it helps shape the purpose.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Prior to beginning this lesson, review the central claim from paragraphs 1-18 with students. Ensure that they understand the central claim and can explain how it has been developed. During this lesson, they will be looking for a supporting claim from these paragraphs.

  • Week 3: November 21

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    10

    11 / 12

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.4

    RI 9-10.5

    RI 9-10.6

    RI 9-10.8

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    SL 9-10.1.a

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 10:

    This is the mid unit assessment. Review the expectations and rubric for the mid unit assessment with students. For some scaffolding, prior to releasing them to write, discuss some of the various purposes of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" that have been discussed so far in this unit.

     

    Combine Lessons 11 and 12:

    Students should complete the culminating quick write from unit 12. While reading, they should be annotating for claims as the quick write asks them to explain how paragraphs 24,25 refine the claim in paragraphs 22,23. It is important that students are using the argument delineation graphic organizer during this lesson.

  • Week 4: November 28

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    13

    14 / 15

    16 / 17 / 18

    19

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL 9-10.2

    RL 9-10.5

    RL 9-10.6

    RI 9-10.3

    RI 9-10.5

    RI 9-10.6

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.4.b

    L.9-10.5

    L.9-10.5.a

    W.9-10.9.a

    W.9-10.9.b

    SL 9-10.1.a

    SL 9-10.1.b

    SL 9-10.1.c

    SL 9-10.1.d

    SL 9-10.1.e

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 13:

    This lesson is centered around an author's development of a central idea. Students will be reading the poem Freedom and will be analyzing how this central idea is developed through imagery. Teacher may need to preview this lesson with information about imagery as the quick write specifically asks them how King and Tagore use imagery to develop the central idea. There are a lot of scaffolded TDQs to help students understand the poet's use of and impact of imagery.

     

    Combine Lessons 14 and 15:

    The lesson's assessment should be the quick write from lesson 15 since the end of unit assessment will ask them to think about how King refines his claims to advance his purpose.

     

    Combined Lessons 16, 17, and 18:

    Students will be focusing on the final 6 paragraphs of the text in this lesson. First focus on lessons 16 and 17 where students are looking closely at the rhetoric and how this advances King's purpose as a whole. Then, they should reread these last paragraphs and analyze them under the lens of lesson 18 where they are focusing on how these paragraphs refine the central ideas of the text.

     

    Lesson 19:

    Tell students that they are going to read a contemporary poem that has similar central ideas to King's piece that we read. Explain to students that a lot of times poems are filled with figurative language, particularly imagery. At this point, students should be familiar with this literary device, so a quick review of it should work. Teacher should then read the poem to students. While reading, students should be annotating for the use of powerful images. Review the students annotations. Then have students work in groups. Students should first reread the poem and then answer the TDQs together.

  • Week 5: December 5

    Module

    2

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    20

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.2

    RI 9-10.3

    RI 9-10.5

    RI 9-10.6

    RI.9-10.7

    W. 9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

    L.9.10.1

    L.9-10.2

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.4.b

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 20:

    This is the end of unit assessment. Teachers should take some time to review the notes about a high performance response. Start off with either a whole group discussion or small group discussions where students are discussing King's purpose for writing the letter, reviewing the claims he makes throughout the text, and then how he uses these claims to advance his purpose. When discussing, students should be filling out the model evidence collection tool which will greatly help them during their independent writing time.  After the discussion, students are then released to independently complete the end of unit assessment.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Just like in the previous unit, before distributing the student texts of Alvarez' "A Genetics of Justice," number the paragraphs. The lesson starts with a masterful read of the text. Consider using various engagement strategies for this initial read (control the game, read aloud, AIR, partner read, etc) based on the needs of your students. Students then will more closely look at paragraphs 1-6 and will answer relevant TDQs while also filling out the central idea tracking tool prior to answering the quick write.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Students will be reading Memmott's article and closely reading paragraphs 5-8 from Alvarez' piece. Students will be pulling evidence from both texts so it is important to review different types of writing as Memmott's is an objective, informational text whereas Alvarez' is more of a narrative that included more of her own feelings/opinions. While reading Memmott's article, students should stop and jot responses to the TDQs to facilitate comprehension. After this reading, students will look at paragraphs 5-8 from Alvarez' and annotate for how these paragraphs supplement the information learned about Trujilo from Memmott's article.

     

    Lesson 3:

    The focus again here is on central idea and how this central idea is specifically developed in paragraphs 9-11. They will again need to use the central idea tracking tool.

  • Week 6: December 12

    Module

    2

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6 / 7

    8

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI 9-10.2

    RI 9-10.3

    RI 9-10.5

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    SL.9-10.1.a-e

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 4:

    This is another lesson that is focused on central idea. Students need to recall central ideas discussed thus far and then explain how these next few paragraphs help develop a central idea. Students can either use the central idea tracking tool that they have been using so far this unit. If some TDQs need to be deleted for time, ensure that you are keeping the ones that drive at the development of central idea and discuss the central ideas whole group.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Students complete the mid unit assessment. Students have to explain how Alvarez develops the claim asserted in paragraph 15. As a possible scaffold/differentiation, teacher could review the claim asserted and/or different ways that a claim in general is supported. Tell students what type of evidence they should be looking for and how an author develops a claim. Review the important aspects of formal writing. The majority of time during this lesson should be time in ink where students are writing and then editing and revising when finished.

     

    Combine Lessons 6 and 7:

    Students are closely reading paragraphs 16-22. Students should complete the quick write from the end of lesson 7 at the end; however, they can pull evidence from all the paragraphs read (not just 20-22). These paragraphs help refine the ideas of silence and trauma that were first introduced in paragraphs 3-7.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Students are again looking at how these paragraphs contribute to the development of the central idea. Students will be looking closely at the way Alvarez herself is characterized as well as what is revealed about her mother. Ultimately, students will need to be able to analyze what the contrast between Alvarez and her mother suggests and how this contrast contributes to the central idea.

  • Week 7: December 19

    Module

    2

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    9

    10 (2 days)

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.2

    RI.9-10.5

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    L.9-10.5.a

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 9

    It is essential that students understand how paragraph 30 reveals how Alvarez' mother has changed and then how this change relates back to the key concept of genetic justice.

     

    Lesson 10 (Day 1):

    Students will begin planning and writing their End of Unit Assessment. They need to explain how the quote explains a central idea of the text. For differentiation purposes, teacher may want to discuss the quote whole group and explain the figurative language a bit prior to releasing students to their independent planning and writing.

     

    Lesson 10 (Day 2):

    Students will use the time today to finish, revise, and edit their end of unit assessment.

  • Week 8: January 9

    Module

    2

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 1:

    Students will use this lesson to get familiar with the document. They should complete the jigsaw activity in small groups so that they are prepared to answer the quick write.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Start off with the masterful reading of Roosevelt's speech. This could be done whole group reading or via one of the audio recordings. After the masterful read, discuss the central idea of her speech with the students. Then begin the close reading of paragraphs 1-2. Insert the scaffolded TDQs and have students complete the argument delineation tool. Discuss the supporting claims and then release for the quick write.

     

    Lesson 3:

    The focus here again is on how Roosevelt develops and refines her claim. Make sure to spend time on paragraph 3 whole group and identifying the author's claim in that paragraph so that students can explain how it is developed in paragraphs 4-9.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Ensure that students are clear about their purpose before completing the close read of these paragraphs

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.5

    RI.9-10.6

    RI.9-10.8

    SL.9-10.1.a-e

    SL.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.4.b

    L.9-10.5.a

  • Week 9: January 16

    Module

    2

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    Weekly Notes

    Lesson 5:

    Consider playing the video of Malala's speech to further add context to the reading. After this viewing, discuss her purpose for the speech as a whole. Then begin the close reading of paragraphs 1-9. Look closely at the rhetoric she uses to advance the purpose looking at the beginning of the thank yous, her actions and the Taliban's actions, and then what she says the Taliban actually accomplished by shooting her.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Students are going to build off the close read from yesterday while looking at paragraphs 10-20 and tying these paragraphs back to a main claim being asserted.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Students will complete the end of unit assessment. Students will have to explain a main claim in each of the texts and then how these form a common claim across the three texts explored.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.5

    RI.9-10.6

    RI.9-10.8

    RI.9-10.9

    W.9-10.9.b

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    L.9-10.4.a

    L.9-10.5.a

    SL.9-10.1.a-e

  • Week 10: January 23

    Module

    2

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    Performance Task

    Weekly Notes

    Begin working on the Performance Task. If final schedule changes things for the following week, do the performance task in its entirety this week. If you will still have days the next week to work on performance task, you can use 2-3 days this week to do a Socratic seminar or some other form of discussion relating to the performance task prior to having students write out the performance task.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.4

    RI.9-10.5

    RI.9-10.6

    RI.9-10.9

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

     W.9-10.5

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    SL.9-10.1.a-e

  • Week 11: January 30

    Module

    2

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    Performance Task

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.4

    RI.9-10.5

    RI.9-10.6

    RI.9-10.9

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.b

     W.9-10.5

    L.9-10.1

    L.9-10.2

    SL.9-10.1.a-e

    Weekly Notes

    Students will be completing the module 2 Performance Task during this week.