Q4 10th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 16-17

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

 

Module 4: Units 2 and 3

In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze nonfiction and dramatic texts, focusing on how the authors convey and develop central ideas concerning imbalance, disorder, tragedy, mortality, and fate.

 

Skip unit 1 of this module and start with unit 2. Since Shakespeare is often challenging for students, it is essential that you are giving them a clear annotation focus during the master read and incorporating some pre-reading prior to diving into the text. Since we have cut unit 1 from the module, the performance task has been adjusted to read as follows: Select a central idea common to Macbeth and Machiavelli’s The Prince. Discuss how each author uses structure, character, word choice, and/or rhetoric to develop this common idea. Explain the nuances in each author’s treatment of the idea.

  • Week 1: April 17

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.3

    SL.9-10.1.c

    SL.9-10.1.d

    RL.9-10.2

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.c

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: The audio book is linked in this lesson if you want to use it for the masterful reading portion of the lessons. This first lesson focuses on character development. It is essential that students recognize that Macbeth himself does not appear in these scenes but instead is being described by others. Take some time to analyze the title and character list as well and preface how closely they are going to have to read to understand and analyze Shakespeare.

     

    Lesson 2: In this lesson, students focus on the central ideas that begin to emerge in the text. While reading, students should annotate for important ideas that are coming up in this scene. Be sure to ask questions from both the masterful reading section as well as the reading and discussion portion.

     

    Lesson 3: Focus is back on character development. There is a soliloquy jigsaw tool that should be used- split students into groups and assign them different soliloquies to analyze. For the reading and discussion portion prioritize the questions that deal with Lady Macbeth and Macbeth's dialogue.

  • Week 2: April 24

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.3

    SL.9-10.1.c

    SL.9-10.1.d

    RL.9-10.4

    W.9-10.9.a

    SL.9-10.1.a

    RL.9-10.5

    L.9-10.4.c

    RL.9-10.2

    Notes:

    Lesson 4: Students will still be focusing on character development; however, now the shift is from looking at the two characters to focusing on the development of their relationship and specifically how the relationship changes. Start the lesson off by having students describe Lady Macbeth and Macbeth's relationship up until this point. While reading these new scenes have students annotate for: How do Macbeth and Lady Macbeth feel about each other? How do they act toward each other? This will set them up to be able to pull out the development of their relationship on the quick write.

     

    Lesson 5: In this lesson students are going to be analyzing how figurative language impacts the mood of this scene. Remind students that mood is the overall feeling of a scene. While listening to the masterful read, students should underline any words, phrases, or sentences that help contribute to the mood of the text. After the reading before releasing students to work on the evidence based jigsaw (or just mixed group work), ensure that students have a literal understanding of the scene. When they do their close reading they will answer questions that have them look at the figurative language- specifically imagery and personification- and will then explain how these devices impact the mood.

     

    Lesson 6: Students will be analyzing how the structural choices that Shakespeare makes in these scenes impacts character development and mood (two things previously discussed in prior lessons). Before listening to the master read, teachers should tell students that we are going to be looking at the impact of how the play is organized and arranged. Ask students to share out some ways an author may choose to structure a play. After listening to the master read, lead a class discussion identifying some of structural choices that Shakespeare made. Then, during the reading and discussion portion students will have time to dig in and see how these choices impacted character development and mood.

     

    Lesson 7: Students will be focusing on the development of a central idea. The quick write asks them to analyze how a specific line identifies a central idea of the text. During the master read students want to pay attention to how Malcolm and Donalbain react in the scene. They should underline the characters' actions, thoughts, and dialogue that reveal how they feel about their father's murder. While rereading and answering the close read questions students should focus also on pulling out the central ideas of appearance vs reality and disorder and imbalance.

  • Week 3: May 1

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.5

    W.9-10.2

    RL.9-10.2

    L.9-10.4.b

    RL.9-10.3

    L.9-10.4.c

    Notes:

    Lesson 8 (this will take two days): Mid-unit Assessment- extend this over two days. On day one have students fill out a graphic organizer with their thesis and evidence. Then on the second day have them actually write their essay answering the prompt.

     

    Lesson 9: Students will be identifying which key details develop the central idea. The central idea present in this section is agency vs. fate. While listening to the master read students should identify times where the characters are given agency vs times when fate is dictating what happens.

     

    Lesson 10: Have students create a T Chart prior to listening to the master read. One side of the chart should be labeled with what Macbeth and Lady Macbeth tell each other in this scene and then the other section should be labeled what Macbeth and Lady Macbeth do not tell each other. Students can fill this out while listening and then share out at the end.

  • Week 4: May 8

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    11

    12

    13

    14

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.3

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.c

    RL.9-10.2

     

    Notes:

    Lesson  11: During the master read, students should focus on the interactions between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. The quick write asks them to explain how these interactions help develop a central idea. As a scaffold, it may be helpful to give students the central idea that you want them to focus on while reading.

     

    Lesson 12: Part of this class is a whole class dramatic reading. Have parts pre-planned or an easy way to assign parts on the spot. Students need to understand that characters often drive plot. During this master read, students are again focusing on character interactions, this time between the witches and Macbeth. Break down the quick write for students. First explain that they will need to discuss the interactions between these characters and then they must explain how these interactions advance the plot. They should be thinking "How do Macbeth and the witches develop the story?"

     

    Lesson 13: In this section of text, students will be looking closely at figurative language and how the details (specifically the identified figurative language) develops a central idea. Again, as a scaffold it may be helpful to give students the central idea. Additionally, students will need to understand how extended metaphors work and be able to follow the extended metaphor of birds that is used.

     

    Lesson 14: This lesson focuses on Macbeth's characterization and figurative language. They are going to be analyzing how the interactions between Macduff and Malcolm support a characterization of Macbeth. For the annotation focus, students should underline words or phrases that are referring to or being used to describe Macbeth. Call out and explain any relevant figurative language.

  • Week 5: May 15

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    15

    16

    17

    18

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.5

    W.9-10.9.a

    L.9-10.4.c

    RL.9-10.3

    SL.9-10.1.a

    RL.9-10.4

    Notes:

    Lesson 15: Since this is a play, it is essential that students understand that the author is very intentional about the structural choices that are made. Ensure that students know what dramatic irony is and how it affects the audience.

     

    Lesson 16: The focus here is on Lady Macbeth and her character change. Students should be tracking the development of Lady Macbeth's character and how it supports the central idea of disorder. While reading, students should annotate evidence that shows that Lady Macbeth is becoming mentally instable. They should focus on character actions and words.

     

    Lesson 17: Students should annotate for character actions, thoughts, and dialogue that tell us about Macbeth and how these further develop Macbeth's character.

     

    Lesson 18: Continuing with the focus on character development and figurative language. For this selection of text, students will analyze how the figurative language used to further develop Macbeth's character. Review imagery and metaphor with students if needed. While reading, tell students to annotate for when Macbeth describes life using comparisons.

  • Week 6: May 22

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    19

    21

    22

    Notes:

    Lesson 19: Students need to know the elements of a tragedy- the lesson includes a list of elements that may be helpful to review with students. Students can annotate for instances of these elements in the text. Lead a whole class discussion on How is Macbeth a tragic hero? What is Macbeth's fatal flaw? How is the resolution of the play tragic?

     

    SKIP LESSON 20

     

    Lesson 21: Pre-writing day for the end of unit assessment. Prompt: Which character bears the most responsibility for the tragedy of Macbeth? Have students fill in the Macbeth Character Responsibility Tool. Then they can begin filling out the Argument Outline Tool.

     

    Lesson 22: (two days) Students should take these last two days of the unit to finish their outline tool and then write the multi paragraph response to that prompt

     

    SKIP LESSONS 23-27

     

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.3

    RL.9-10.5

    W.9-10.9.a

    W.9-10.1.b

  • Week 7: May 29

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Notes:

    Lesson 1:

    Make a connection between this text and Macbeth. They can apply some of the information in this reading about a successful ruler to Macbeth. Students need to pull out the central idea in these paragraphs and then details that support it. Students should read with the annotation focus: What makes a good prince?

     

    Lesson 2:

    He continues with his argument about fear and love in this section. Students will be looking at how the claim is developed here so there may need to be a review on rhetoric. Rhetoric refers to the specific techniques that writers or speakers use to create meaning in a text, enhance a text or a speech, and in particular, persuade readers or listeners.  Front load this information for students so that when they go back into the text they are specifically looking for and annotating for rhetoric.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Students will read a new chapter of the The Prince. They should start off by analyzing the title and what he means by the title.  They are looking for a common central idea that is found in this chapter and the one that was previously read. They should annotate during the master read for the way he describes princes vs the way he describes men and animals.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.2

    W.9-10.9.b

    RI.9-10.6

    L.9-10.4.a

  • Week 8: June 5

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    4

    5

    Performance

    Notes:

    Lesson 4:

    Students will be finishing the chapter and looking at the idea of appearance vs reality. This was present in Macbeth as well so connections can be made here. Be sure to plan for the quote collection activity so that it runs smoothly.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Students will be putting together their learning in this end of unit assessment. They are analyzing Macbeth through Machiavelli's lens. They will respond via discussion to the prompt that asks them to decide if Macbeth would be considered a successful prince according to Machiavelli's rules. Give students time to gather their own thoughts and then share out in a classroom discussion.

     

    PT Day 1:

    Preview the performance task with students and break it down for them. Explain to them the structure of the essay (5 paragraph which at this point they have experience writing). Then, have students fill in their Performance Assessment Synthesis graphic organizer for Macbeth and The Prince. Collect this at the end of this class to give students some quick feedback to ensure they are on the right track in selecting a central idea that is common in both texts and have started to find strong, relevant evidence.

     

    PT Day 2:

    Give students additional time to fill out the graphic organizer and find all of their evidence that they will need to write this essay. Collect the graphic organizers again and really focus on the strength of the evidence that they have included.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.9-10.5

    SL.9-10.1.a

    SL.9-10.1.b

    W.9-10.9.a

    W.9-10.9.b

    SL.9-10.1.a

  • Week 9: June 12

    Lesson

    Performance Task

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RL.9-10.2

    RL.9-10.3

    RL.9-10.4

    RL.9-10.5

    RI.9-10.2

    RI.9-10.4

    RI.9-10.6

    W.9-10.2.a-f

    W.9-10.9.a, b

    L.9-10.1.a, b

    L.9-10.2.a-c

    Notes:

    Students will write their multi-paragraph essay as the performance task. Have students write a rough draft of all 5 paragraphs. If necessary, review with students or give them a graphic organizer about strong introductions and conclusions. Once they have their rough drafts, spend some time on whole group feedback sessions based on what you are seeing in the papers (objective tone, commas, varying sentence structure, etc). Depending on time, allow 1-2 day for revising and editing. Then have students write their final drafts.