Q3 11th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Updated 12/20/17

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 3: Researching Multiple Perspectives to Develop a Position

Unit 1: Hope, Despair, and Memory by Elie Weisel:

This is the central text that students will use to develop questions to drive their research.  The teacher may also pose a research question to guide students thinking.  One suggested question is: How can genocide be prevented?

 

Unit 2:

Teacher selected articles to read and then use when writing the argumentative paper. This unit should last roughly three weeks.  There are several model supplemental texts that can be used if the teacher is providing students with the research question.  Students turn in a completed Research Portfolio, including their Research Journals. In addition, students write a one-page synthesis of their developing perspectives derived from their research. Students draw on the research evidence collected to express an Evidence-Based Perspective on their problem-based question.

 

Note: The links to the source texts for unit 2 can all be found here.

 

All links have been vetted and will work. If you have a problem accessing them please report the issue.

 

Unit 3: Argumentative Writing Unit

Performance Task:  A video presentation of the student's research paper.

 

Note: individual unit and lesson pages for this domain were not created on engageNY.org. As such, each week's units and lessons are unlinked.

  • Week 1: February 5

    Module

    3

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.11-12.2

    L.11-12.4.a,b

    RI.11-12.6

    L.11-12.1.a

     

    L.11-12.3.a

    L.11-12.5.a

    W.11-12.9.b

    L.11-12.3

    Notes:

    Lesson 1, Paragraphs 1-4:

    In this portion of text, Wiesel introduces a Hasidic legend that introduces the central ideas of memory, hope, and suffering. Students begin to track these central ideas as they emerge and build upon one another.

     

    Lesson 2, Paragraphs 5-7:

    Using the Rhetorical Impact Tracking Tool, students record their insights about how Wiesel uses specific language, imagery, paradox, and varied syntax to advance a purpose. Additionally, students begin the research process using the Surfacing Issues Tool to identify potential areas of investigation in the text.

     

    Lesson 3, Paragraphs 8-11:

    Students continue to read and analyze “Hope, Despair and Memory,” building their understanding of Wiesel’s use of language and rhetoric, and considering how he continues to develop the idea of memory in the lecture. Students continue to identify potential research topics and record them on their Surfacing Issues Tools.

     

    Lesson 4, Paragraphs 12-17:

    Students focus on how Wiesel presents the paradox of the importance of remembering events and the human capacity to forget. Students continue to surface issues in the text for the purposes of research and learn how to generate inquiry questions from these issues.

  • Week 2: February 12

    Module

    3

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.11-12.6

    SL.11-12.1

    L.11-12.3

    RI.11-12.2

    W.11-12.9.b

    SL.11-12.1.c

    CCRA.R.8

    Notes:

    Lesson 5, Paragraphs 18-23:

    Wiesel emphasizes the importance of documenting and communicating the experiences of Holocaust victims to prevent future atrocities. Students examine and record how Wiesel uses rhetoric in this portion of text to advance his purpose.

     

    Lesson 6, Paragraphs 24-26:

    Students focus on how Wiesel continues to develop the central ideas of memory, suffering, and solidarity by referencing present-day examples of injustice and offering steps to correct them. Students continue to track potential issues for research

     

    Lesson 7, Paragraphs 27-29:

    Students complete their reading of, “Hope, Despair and Memory” and consider how Wiesel crafts a persuasive and compelling lecture through the use of claims, counterclaims, evidence, and reasoning.

  • Week 3: February 19

    Module

    3

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.1.b

    W.11-12.7

    W.11-12.8.

    W.11-12.9

    SL.11-12.1.d

    SL.11-12.4

    W.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.4

    SL.11-12.3

    L.11-12.4.a-d

    Notes:

    Lesson 1:

    Students are formally introduced to the research unit and construct a Research Portfolio to house all research they previously conducted in Unit 1 and the research materials

    distributed and gathered in this unit.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Students learn how to select inquiry questions, plan search locations, and use key words and phrases to conduct effective and efficient research. Additionally, students learn how to formally assess sources for credibility, accessibility, and relevance.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Students continue to develop their research skills as they learn how to read important sources closely for selected inquiry questions, using annotation and note taking. Students are introduced to additional annotation codes and a Taking Notes Tool.

  • Week 4: February 26

    Module

    3

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.1.b

    W.11-12.7

    W.11-12.8.

    W.11-12.9

    SL.11-12.1.d

    SL.11-12.4

    W.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.4

    SL.11-12.3

    L.11-12.4.a-d

    Notes:

    Lesson 5:

    Students learn how to evaluate an evidence-based argument. Students work to develop an ability to identify the necessary components of a compelling argument, systematically evaluate arguments, and assess the effectiveness of these arguments.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Students construct a frame (Research Frame Tool) to guide their research by establishing inquiry paths that allow them to explore various aspects of their research topic/area of investigation.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Students begin to conduct searches independently using the Research Frame and associated search tools  While researching, students consider how to use inquiry questions to drive research while continually assessing sources for credibility and usefulness in answering those inquiry questions.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Students continue to conduct searches independently using the Research Frame as a guide, with the associated search tools. Additionally, students read sources closely,

    analyze details and ideas, and take notes for each source to determine how it addresses inquiry questions and paths.

  • Week 5: March 5

    Module

    3

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    15

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    RI.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.1.b

    W.11-12.7

    W.11-12.8.

    W.11-12.9

    SL.11-12.1.d

    SL.11-12.4

    W.11-12.1.a

    W.11-12.4

    SL.11-12.3

    L.11-12.4.a-d

    Notes:

    Lesson 10:

    Students analyze and synthesize their research to make claims about inquiry questions within an inquiry path. Students complete at least two Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools for all inquiry paths on the Research Frame. These initial claims are the foundation for the Evidence-Based Perspective students will develop in Lesson 15.

     

    Lesson 11:

    Students organize, analyze, and synthesize their claims (Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools) from the previous

    lesson to develop comprehensive claims about each inquiry path in the Research Frame. This work directly prepares students for developing and writing an Evidence-Based Perspective (End-of-Unit Assessment) in Lesson 15.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Students choose one claim from the previous lesson to form a counterclaim in opposition to that claim. Students identify evidence to support their counterclaims and record that

    information on the Forming Counterclaims Tool before using the Evidence-Based Claims Criteria Checklist to evaluate a peer’s counterclaim.

     

    Lesson 15:

    Students complete the End-of-Unit Assessment by conducting a final review of the Research Portfolio and writing an Evidence Based Perspective based on the research outcomes from the unit. Students submit the final Research Portfolio and the Evidence-Based Perspective

  • Week 6: March 12

    Module

    3

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.11-12.5

    W.11-12.9

    W.11-12.1.a,b

    W.11-12.7

    SL.11-12.4

    W.11-12.4

    W.11-12.8

    L.11-12.6

    Notes:

    Lesson 1:

    Students are introduced to the process of drafting a research-based argument paper. Students learn how to develop their research-based argument paper using the foundation of the Evidence-Based Perspective they completed in the previous unit.  Students organize their supporting claims and evidence for each claim on the Outline Tool, and decide which evidence best supports each claim.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Students continue to plan for their argument-based research papers by completing the Outline Tool introduced in the previous lesson. Students create a counterclaim in opposition to the central claim developed in the previous lesson. Students address the strengths and limitations of their central claims by developing supporting claims for the counterclaim.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Students learn how to selectively and effectively integrate information into writing to maintain the flow of ideas. Students learn MLA conventions for in-text citation as well as for the Works Cited page. Students draft a Works Cited page.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Students begin to write their research-based argument papers.  Students then learn about the purpose and components of an effective introduction. Through discussion and examination of an exemplar and non-exemplar introduction, students further develop their understanding of how to write an effective introduction.

  • Week 7: March 19

    Module

    3

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    5

    6

    9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.11-12.4

    W.11-12.1.c,e,a

    L.11-12.1

    L.11-12.6

    SL.11-12.1

    SL.11-12.4

    L.11-12.3.a

    Notes:

    Lesson 5:

    Students focus on building cohesion and clarity as they continue to draft their research-based argument papers. Students work to improve the effectiveness of their writing by focusing on the use of transitional words and phrases and the relationships among evidence, claims, and counterclaims within their papers.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Students learn to craft a concluding statement that follows from and further supports the argument and appropriately connects sections of the text. Students deepen their understanding of how transitional words, phrases and connecting ideas contribute to and shape reasoning by developing the closing statements of their research-based argument papers.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Students continue to refine and revise their research papers for flow and cohesiveness. Students continue to conference with the teacher. Students also provide peer feedback using a peer feedback rubric and checklist to guide their review, and to guide their revisions to their own papers.

  • Week 8: April 2

    Module

    3

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    5

    6

    9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    W.11-12.5

    SL.11-12.1

    SL.11-12.6

    L.11-12.1.b

    L.11-12.2.a,b

    W.11-12.1.a,e

    W.11-12.4

    W.11-12.8

    W.11-12.9

    Notes:

    Lesson 10:

    Students continue to edit and revise their papers. Students are introduced to common hyphenation conventions and continue the peer review process by editing for capitalization, punctuation,and spelling.

     

    Lesson 12:

    In this last lesson of the unit, the End-of-Unit Assessment,students work in class to finalize the research-based argument papers, editing, polishing, and rewriting as necessary. Students are assessed on the alignment of the final draft to the criteria of the 11.3.3 Rubric.

     

    Module Performance Assessment:

    Use the rest of the week to introduce the Module Performance Assessment which can be found on pages 16-28 of the full module download. The assessment is a video presentation of students' research papers.

  • Week 9: April 9

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    SL.11-12.3

    SL.11-12.4

    SL.11-12.5

    Module

    3

    Unit

    3

     

    End of Module

    Performance Task

    SL.11-12.6

    L.11-12.3.a

    L.11-12.6

    Notes:

    Use this week to continue work on the End of Module Performance Assessment which can be found on pages 16-28 of the full module download.