Q1 2nd Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Listening & Learning:

  • Listening & Learning Overview

    Teachers: for support with BOY CKLA Assessments, please refer to this guide.

    Domain 1: Fairy Tales and Tall Tales

    This domain will introduce students to classic fairy tales and tall tales and the well-known lessons they teach. This domain will also lay the foundation for understanding stories in future grades. The first half of the Fairy Tales and Tall Tales domain focuses on fairy tales. These fairy tales will remind students of the elements of fiction they have heard about in previous grades and will be a good reintroduction to the practice of Listening & Learning. Students who have used the Core Knowledge Language Arts program in Kindergarten and Grade 1 will be familiar with some fairy tales and the elements of the fairy tale genre from the Kings and Queens domain (Kindergarten) and from the Fairy Tales domain (Grade 1). In this domain, students will be reminded of these elements and hear the fairy tales of “The Fisherman and His Wife,” “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” and “Beauty and the Beast.” Students will be able to relate to the problems faced by characters in each of these memorable tales, as well as learn from the lessons in each story. The second half of the domain focuses on tall tales and the elements of that genre. Students will be introduced to the tall tales of “Paul Bunyan,” “Pecos Bill,” “John Henry,” and “Casey Jones.” Learning about tall tales will introduce students to the setting of the American frontier and some of the occupations settlers had.

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 5 of the Domain 1 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

    Please reference the supplemental guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

    Trade Books recommended for read alouds throughout the domain can be found on pgs. 8-11 of your Domain 1 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg.11 of the teacher's guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the guide.

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 Turn and Talk opportunities during the fable read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will be opportunities for discussion at the end of each read aloud.

     

    Domain 2: Early Asian Civilizations

    This domain will introduce students to the continent of Asia and its two most populous countries, India and China. Students will learn about the early civilizations in India and China and how they were both able to form because of mighty rivers. Students will once again hear about the important features of early civilizations, to which they were introduced in the Grade 1 Early World Civilizations domain. These features include the advent of farming, establishment of cities and government, and other practices such as writing and religion. (You may wish to borrow the Early World Civilizations and Early American Civilizations Anthologies from your Grade 1 teachers for your personal review of these features.) Students will first learn about early India and will be introduced to the basics of Hinduism and Buddhism—two major religions from this area—as major forces shaping early Indian civilization. They will also hear two works of fiction originally from India: “The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal” and “The Blind Men and the Elephant.” Then, students will learn about early Chinese civilization and the many contributions made by the early Chinese, including paper, silk, and the Great Wall of China. The content in this domain is reinforced through the informational/ explanatory writing genre. This domain will lay the foundation for further study of Asia in later grades and will help students better understand world history in later years.

    Using a world map or globe, have students review the names of all seven continents as you point to them. Ask students if they know which of these continents is the largest in the world. Using the world map or globe, have a student locate and point to the continent of Asia. Tell students this is the continent of Asia and that it is the largest continent in the world. Share with students that Asia has the two most populous countries—or the two countries with the most people in them—in the world. Point to China and India on the world map or globe. Tell students that these two countries are China and India, and that each of these countries has more than a billion people living within its borders. You may wish to share that the population of India is four times larger than the population of the United States. Then share with students that over the next several days they are going to learn about the ancient civilizations that began in India and China. Tell students that they will hear what life was like for the people who lived in these ancient civilizations all those years ago. Share that they will also learn about some of the inventions created in these ancient (or early) civilizations, inventions that are still used in Asia—and around the world—today.

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 6 of the Domain 2 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

    Please reference the supplemental guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

    Trade Books recommended for read alouds throughout the domain can be found on pgs. 9-11 of your Domain 2 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg.11 of the teacher's guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the guide.

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 Turn and Talk opportunities during the fable read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will be opportunities for discussion at the end of each read aloud.

  • Week 1: September 4

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    1 (2 days)

    2 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 1:

    Consider introducing the turn and talk protocol to have students share what they know about fairy tales. Chart their answers. Be sure to remind students that fairy tales often feature a royal character and/or one with supernatural or magical powers. Ask students to predict what type of magical powers the character in this story will have, and whether there will be a royal character. Tell students to listen to see if their predictions are correct. When introducing the author's of the story and telling students that they are from Germany, show Germany on a map.

     

    Lesson 2:

    The author of the story for this lesson is from Denmark. When you introduce the author, show students Denmark on a map or globe. To continue to practice the turn and talk protocol ask students to share with each other why they think someone would pretend to know something they don't really know.

  • Week 2: September 11

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    3 (2 days)

    4 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 3:

    Review what students have learned about fairy tales so far. Compare and contrast the two fairy tales students have heard so far. Consider charting this with students for visual support.

     

    Lesson 4:

    When students retell what they retell the part of the story they have heard so far, consider providing a graphic organizer for students or doing a graphic organizer whole group to help student organize the information.

  • Week 3: September 18

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    5 (2 days)

    6 (2 days)

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    PP: You should pause here and spend one day reviewing, reinforcing, or extending the material taught thus far.

     

    Lesson 5:

    The next several read-alouds students will hear are tall tales. Explain to students that tall tales are a type of folktale. Share that tall tales, like other folktales, were first told orally many, many years ago and were later written down. Tell students that tall tales are humorous stories often about real-life heroes of the American frontier during the 1800s. Help to build students' background knowledge by explaining what logging is. Before reading the story, be sure to explain the concept of exaggeration to students.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Review the characteristics for Tall Tales with students. Have students identify the reviewed characteristics in Paul Bunyan. Build students' background knowledge for this lesson by explaining what a cowboy is.

  • Week 4: September 25

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    7 (2 days)

    8 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 7:

    Build students' background knowledge for today's story by sharing different facts about John Henry

     

    Lesson 8:

    Review the story of John Henry with students to review the characteristics of Tall Tales before reading reading today's story. Tell students to listen for these same characteristics in today's story.

  • Week 5: October 2

    Domain

    1

    Lesson

    DR (1 day)

    DA (1 day)

    CA (1 day)

    Assessment

    DR=Domain Review

    DA=Domain Assessment

    CA=Culminating Activities

    Notes:

    Domain Review:

    You should spend one day reviewing and reinforcing the material in this domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities provided, in either whole-group or small-group settings.

     

    Domain Assessment:

    This domain assessment evaluates each student's retention of domain and academic vocabulary words and the core content targeted in Fairy Tales and Tall Tales. The results should guide review and remediation the following day.

    There are three parts to this assessment. You may choose to do the parts in more than one sitting if you feel this is more appropriate for your students. Part I (vocabulary assessment) is divided into two sections: the first assesses domain-related vocabulary, and the second assesses academic vocabulary. Parts II and III of the assessment address the core content targeted in Fairy Tales and Tall Tales.

     

    Culminating Activities:

    Please use this final day to address class results of the Domain Assessment. Based on the results of the Domain Assessment and students' Tens scores, you may wish to use this class time to provide remediation opportunities that target specific areas of weakness for individual students, small groups, or the whole class. Alternatively, you may also choose to use this class time to extend or enrich students' experience with domain knowledge. A number of enrichment activities are provided in order to provide students with opportunities to enliven their experiences with domain concepts.

  • Week 6: October 10

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    1 (2 days)

    2 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 1:

    Remind students that they have already learned about some ancient or early civilizations in the Core Knowledge Language Arts program in Grade 1. Ask students to share what the word ancient means, and review that ancient means very old. So, an ancient civilization is one that is very old and was formed many, many years ago. Ask students to share what the word civilization means. Remind students that a civilization is an advanced society or one that is very developed, and has laws, a written language, large cities, and often a religion. Ask students what they remember about the Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations. You may need to remind students that the Maya, Aztec, and Inca were early American civilizations. The Egyptian civilization formed on the continent of Africa, and the Mesopotamian civilization formed on the continent of Asia. As you talk about these continents, point to them on a world map or globe. You may also wish to remind students that civilizations in Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt developed around large rivers that flooded and left behind rich soil for growing crops. Be sure to create the map suggested in the extension activities.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Use the map created in the extension of Lesson 1 to help students review what they have already learned about ancient India.

  • Week 7: October 16

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    3 (2 days)

    4 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 3:

    You may want to make preparations in advance. You will need to prepare a piece of blue construction paper cut into the shape of the Ganges River.

    Remind students that as they continue to learn about many new places and several important rivers, they will continue their map quest journey. Remind them that you will label a class map along with them as they fill out their own maps.

    Tell students that in today's read-aloud about ancient India, they will hear about another important river. Show students the Ganges River on a world map. Ask students to locate this river on their map of Asia (Instructional Master 1B-1). Have students label and color the Ganges River in blue. Then tape your cutout of the Ganges River on your class map. Ask, "What are the two rivers that were important during the development of the ancient Indian civilization?" (the Indus River and the Ganges River) Point out to students that both of these rivers flow down from the Himalayan Mountains.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Tell students that today's read-aloud is a folktale from India, a country on the continent of Asia. Explain that a folktale is a story that someone made up long, long ago and has been told again and again. Have students locate India on the class map, a world map, or a globe. If students cannot locate India, point to it on the map. Ask students to identify and locate which continent India is a part of and what they have learned so far about India and Asia.

  • Week 8: October 23

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    5 (2 days)

    6 (2 days)

    Notes:

    Lesson 5:

    In this lesson, students are going to listen to a poem whose characters are from Hindustan. Tell students that the word Hindustan, meaning "the land of the Hindus," is an old name for the northern part of India. Have students locate India on their map from the Map Quest extension, a world map, or a globe. If students cannot find India on the map, locate it for them. Ask students to share what continent India is on and what they know about India and the continent of Asia. There are six blind men in this poem. Ask students to predict how the blind men will describe what an elephant is like. Ask students what words they might use. Keep a record of their predictions so that you can easily refer to them during the second reading of the poem.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Tell students that over the last two lessons, they have listened to a story and a poem associated with the Country of India, which they are studying. You may wish to take a poll to see which of the two narratives the students liked better: "The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal" or "The Blind Men and the Elephant." Remind students that there are often holidays associated with a particular religion. If students were exposed to the Early World Civilizations domain in Grade 1, ask them if they know of any holidays associated with Judaism, Christianity, and/or Islam. Tell students to listen carefully to today's read-aloud to find out if there are any important holidays in Hinduism.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Domain

    2

    Lesson

    7 (2 days)

    PP (1 day)

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Lesson 7:

    For this lesson, use Instructional Master 3B-1 to have students review what they have already learned about Hinduism. You may also wish to ask students to provide any interesting facts they remember from the previous read-aloud that are not on the chart, such as what Diwali is, who celebrates it, and why. Remind students that there is still an empty column on their chart that needs to be completed. Share with students that this column is titled Buddhism.

     

    PP: You should pause here and spend one day reviewing, reinforcing, or extending the material taught thus far.

Skills

  • Notes to Teacher

    Notes to Teacher: Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smartboard, or writing the material on chart paper or a whiteboard.

  • Week 1: September 4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: Prior to the lesson, organize a complete set of the Individual Code Charts for each student. Make sure you have all 10 charts for each student, arrange them in the page order indicated and then clip a notebook ring through each set of charts.

    Lesson 2: During today's warm-up, point out which consonant sounds in each pair are voiced and unvoiced: /k/ (unvoiced)-/g/ (voiced). Emphasize that sounds in this pair resemble one another very closely, which is why these sounds and spellings are grouped together on

    the Code Chart. This may

    be useful to know when students are referring to their own charts for spelling help.

    Lesson 3: During today's warm-up, point out which consonant sounds in each pair are voiced and unvoiced: /k/ (unvoiced) - /g/ (voiced);

    /f/ (unvoiced)- /v/ (voiced). Emphasize that sounds in each pair resemble one another very closely, which is why these sounds and spellings are grouped together on the Code Chart. This may be useful to know when students are referring to their own charts for spelling help.

    Lesson 4: During today's warm-up, remind students when two letters are used to spell one sound, such as ‘ng’, ‘sh’, ‘ch’, or ‘th’, it is called a digraph.

  • Week 2: September 11

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    6: Story Reading Assessment

    7: Story Reading Assessment

        Word Reading Assessment

    8: Story Reading Assessment

        Word Reading Assessment

    CKLA BOY Assessment Guide

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: Be sure to have students use their individual code charts in today's lesson.

    Lesson 6: Story Reading. Copy the Placement Planning Sheet in the Placement section located after Lesson 10 of the teacher guide. See the flowchart on pg. 50 of your teacher's guide to determine which assessments students need to take (BOY Assessment).

    Lesson 7: Story/Word Reading. During one-on-one assessments, students may work on Worksheets 7.3 and 7.4, as well as any additional independent activities you have planned (BOY Assessment).

    Lesson 8: Be sure to enter students’ scores on the Placement Planning Sheet. Those students who were able to answer five or more of the questions correctly will take the “Sink or Float” assessment in the next lesson. Students who answered fewer than five correct will take the Word Reading Assessment to help you determine placement for those students. (BOY Assessment)

  • Week 3: September 18

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    9: Story Reading Assessment

        Word Reading Assessment

    10: Word Reading Assessment

    CKLA BOY Assessment Guide

    Notes:

    Lesson 9: Story/Word Reading (BOY Assessment).

    Lesson 10: Word Reading (BOY Assessment).

    **Data Analysis needs to occur after all skills assessments are given to determine small groups and the skills that need to be taught to individual groups of students (see pgs. 63-76 of your teacher's guide).**

    Lesson 11: Advanced preparation: Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one per card: the, he, she, we, be, me.

    See Tricky Words in the Pausing Point for students needing additional help with Tricky Words. Additional tricky word practice may be found in the Assessment and Remediation Guide, Unit 1 section. During Partner Reading, If some student pairs finish early, they can illustrate one of the words or phrases from the Supplemental Materials section. Write several of these words or phrases on the board or chart paper prior to starting partner reading.

    Lesson 12: Advanced preparation: Prior to reading time, create a chart to document story events and the cat bandit’s clever ways. Create columns to record the title, characters, setting, the food the cat bandit stole, and how he got to the food. This will serve as a visual reminder of the cat bandit’s adventures. The Cat Bandit Reader also has onomatopoeia in each story, so you may choose to create a column to record these words. Onomatopoeia are words that name a sound by trying to mimic the actual sound. For example, in the sentence “the cow moos and the pig oinks,” moo and oink sound like the actual animal sounds and are therefore onomatopoeia words. Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one word per card: was, of, a.

  • Week 4: September 25

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    13

    14

    15

    16

    Assessment

    15: Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 13: Mastering the various letter-sound correspondences will enable students to read one-syllable words with ease. However, knowing these letter-sound correspondences is no guarantee that students will be able to apply this knowledge to reading multi-syllable words. To this end, most students will benefit from additional instruction learning to recognize, chunk, and read syllables as parts of longer words.

    Lesson 14: Advanced Preparation: Write all of the Tricky Words on the board prior to the lesson. (he, she, we, be, me, the, a, was, of)

    Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one word per card: do, to, down, how.

    Lesson 15: For the spelling section: At a time later today, you may find it helpful to use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze the students’ mistakes. This will help you to understand any patterns that are beginning to develop within your classroom or that are persisting among individual students.

    Lesson 16: For Spelling: /qu/ is actually two sounds (/k/ + /w/). You can either teach this to students as two sounds or just glide over it without drawing attention to the fact. If you have good listeners, some of them may hear that /qu/ is actually /k/ + /w/.

    As you review these digraph spellings, you may also wish to review the sounds that the single letters generally stand for. For example, when introducing ‘wh’ you might cover the ‘h’, leaving only the ‘w’ visible, and ask, “What sound would you say if you saw this in a word?” Then you could cover the ‘w’, leaving only the ‘h’ visible, and ask, “What sound would you say if you saw this in a word?” Then show the digraph.

    We encourage you to avoid speaking of “silent letters” when discussing spellings like ‘wr’ and ‘kn’. Just say that these two letters stand for one sound, in the same way ’sh‘ and ’ch‘ stand for one sound.

  • Week 5: October 2

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    17

    18

    19

    20

    Assessment

    20: Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 17: Write the following sentences on index cards (one word per card) or sentence strips. The punctuation should be on a separate card. If using sentence strips, cut the sentence apart so only one word is on each section. Please make sure the punctuation mark is on a separate card. After writing the sentences, tape the word and punctuation cards randomly to the board.

    Sentences:

    Where was the ham?

    It stuck to the pan.

    Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one word per card: what, where, why, was, and from.

    Lesson 18: Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one word per card: once, one.

    Write the scrambled sentences below on the board, one at a time:

    girl tall a is she (She is a tall girl. Is she a tall girl?)

    ball like to you do play (Do you like to play ball? You do like to play ball!)

    Lesson 19: Advanced preparation: Write all of the Tricky Words reviewed in previous lessons (he, she, we, be, me, the, a, was, from, of, to, do, down, how, what, where, why, once, one) on the board at a level where students will be able to tap them with a ruler or a pointer.

    Lesson 20: Additional practice may with the Tricky Spelling 's' can be found in the Unit 1 section of the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

  • Week 6: October 10

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    21

    22

    PP

    Assessment

    22: Comprehension Assessment

         Dictation Assessment

         Skills Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 21: Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards, one word per card: could, should, would.

    Lesson 22: Remember to give the spelling assessment at the end of the week. After giving the spelling test, you may find it useful to use the template provided at the end of Lesson 22 to analyze students’ spelling errors. This will help you to understand any patterns beginning to develop within your classroom or persisting among individual students.

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 1. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

  • Week 7: October 16

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Notes:

    Lesson 1: If you have not already done so, beginning with this lesson you will place the Tricky Words on a Tricky Word wall. It will be interesting for students to see how a word “changes color” as it becomes decodable. For example, in this lesson, you will treat the word street as a Tricky Word as students have not yet reviewed the spelling for ‘ee’ as /ee/ sound. However, after Lesson 3, the word street can “change color” to green as you will then have reviewed the spelling ‘ee’ of the vowel sound /ee/. Once you have reviewed the spelling, the word street can move to your decodable word wall and be written on a green index card.

    Lesson 2: In this lesson, students will read two-syllable words. Students may recall reading two-syllable words in Grade 1 with a dot in dividing the word into syllables. In Grade 2 we have removed that support. To review reading two-syllable words, we begin with compound words. It is easy for students to see the syllable division as the words easily stand alone. You may wish to cover part of the word with your hand and have students read the word, then place your hand over the first word and have students read the second word. (For a full explanation, please refer to the Appendix at the end of this guide: Using Chunking to Decode Multi-syllable words.)

    Lesson 3: Advance Preparation: Write the following sentences on index cards with one word or punctuation mark on each card:

    Can't I sit up a bit?

    This is a bedtime tale your Gramp liked to tell me.

    Lesson 4: Advance Preparation: The words,sentences, and contractions from pg. 47 need to be written on index cards.

  • Week 8: October 23

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    5: Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: Advanced preparation: Write the following Tricky Words on yellow index cards: no, go, and so.

    Lesson 6: You will need to make an enlarged poster size copy of the writing process chart located at the end of this lesson.

    Prepare another copy of Worksheet 6.2 for display using your projection system.

    Write the following words on yellow index cards: are, were, and some.

    Lesson 7: Today you will review the ‘ou’ sound spelling for /ou/ learned in Grade 1 CKLA. You will also introduce a spelling alternative for the /ou/ sound: ‘ow’ as in now.

    Lesson 8: Advance Preparation: On the last page of this lesson we have provided a rough draft from Mr. Mowse. Mr. Mowse likes to write but he is very shy. Included in the draft are a variety of misspellings and omitted capital letters, words, and punctuation. Copy onto chart paper (or whatever display format you are using), skipping every other line, to leave room for editing. You may wish to write the sentences using a different color for each sentence. This will make it easier to refer to specific parts of the story. The ideal draft will be one that is good but still in need of improvement in one or more of the areas on the editing checklist (Worksheet 8.1). You will also need a display copy of the writing process chart, the editing checklist (either on chart paper or transparency), and blank chart paper.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    10: Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 9: Please see Appendix B for more information on syllable division and chunking,

    Lesson 10: See Letter-Sound Correspondences in the Pausing Point for students needing additional help with ’er’ words.

    Lesson 11: Additional activities for students having difficulty discerning between ‘or,’ ‘ar,’ and ‘er’ can be found in the Pausing Point, as well as the Unit 2 section of the Assessment and Remediation Guide. See Grammar in the Pausing Point for students needing additional help with quotation marks, additional practice may also be found in the Unit 2 section of the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

    Lesson 12: Advance Preparation: Write the chart from pg. 110 on chart paper or the board