Q3 2nd Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Listening & Learning

  • Listening & Learning Overview

    Listening & Learning Overview Q3

     

    **Grade 2 Teachers: Please note that there will be an additional L&L lesson on Fridays beginning in Q3. We have added a new domain for the 2016-17 school year and in order to fit in all of the lessons, we will need to complete 30 minutes of L&L instruction on Fridays. The 90 remaining minutes of your literacy block can be used for small groups, remediation and enrichment, like it has been previously.**

     

    Domain 3: Ancient Greek Civilization

    This domain will introduce students to an ancient civilization whose contributions can be seen in many areas of our lives today. Students will learn about the gods and goddesses of the ancient Greeks, the city-states of Sparta and Athens, and the philosophers Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. They will learn about the first Olympic Games held in honor of Zeus, the significance of the battles of Marathon and Thermopylae, and the conquests of Alexander the Great. Students will also learn about the Greek contribution of democracy and how those ideas are used today in many governments, including our own. The content in this domain is reinforced through the fictional narrative writing genre.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg. 5 of the Domain 3 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the supplemental guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for Read Alouds throughout the Domain can be found on pp. 8-9 of your Domain 3 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg. 9 of the Teacher's Guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the Guide.

     

    Note: In order to increase students' Listening and Learning stamina, make it a goal to try at least 2-3 Turn and Talk opportunities during the read alouds to increase student engagement and discourse. There will also be opportunities for Think-Pair-Share at the end of each read aloud.

     

    Domain 4: Greek Myth

    This domain builds on The Ancient Greek Civilization domain and will introduce students to several well-known Greek myths and many well-known mythical characters. Students will learn that the ancient Greeks worshiped many gods and goddesses, and that the twelve they believed lived on Mount Olympus, the home of the gods, were the most powerful.

     

    Students will learn the definition of a myth: a fictional story, once thought to be true that tried to explain mysteries of nature and humankind. They will also learn about myths that include supernatural beings or events, and that myths give insight into the ancient Greek culture. Students will hear about Prometheus and Pandora, Demeter and Persephone, Arachne the Weaver, the Sphinx, and Hercules, among others.

     

    References to Greek mythology are still culturally relevant today, and this domain will give students a frame of reference with which to understand literary allusions and the meanings of common words and expressions, such as herculean. It will also better enable them to understand modern re-tellings of these ancient stories. It is important to note that the content of some myths might unsettle some children. While these versions of the stories have been adapted from the originals, and most potentially unsettling details have been eliminated, some students may still be sensitive to details contained in the versions presented here. You may want to remind students periodically that these myths are fiction.

     

    Please preview all read-alouds and lessons in this domain before presenting them to students and feel free to substitute a trade book from the list of recommended trade books if you feel doing so would be more appropriate for your students. As you read, use the same strategies that you have been using when reading the read-aloud selections in this Anthology—pause and ask occasional questions; rapidly clarify critical vocabulary within the context of the read-aloud; etc. After you finish reading the trade book, lead students in a discussion as to how the story or information in the book relates to the read-alouds in this domain. The content in this domain is reinforced through the fictional narrative writing genre in the last four lessons of the domain.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain (pg 5 of the Domain 4 Teacher's Guide). Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity. Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

     Please reference the supplemental guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction. This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for Read Alouds throughout the Domain can be found on pp. 8-9 of your Domain 4 Teacher's Guide. Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg. 9 of the Teacher's Guide. These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the Guide.

     

    Domain 6:  Cycles in Nature

    This domain will introduce your students to the many natural cycles that make life on Earth possible. Your students will increase their knowledge of cycles in nature by learning more about seasonal cycles, and by beginning their study of flowering plants and trees, animal life cycles, and the importance of the water cycle. Students will also learn about the effect seasonal changes have on plants and animals. In addition, throughout this domain, students will gain exposure to poems by renowned authors Emily Dickinson and Robert Louis Stevenson. As students learn that all organisms experience the developmental stages of the life cycle, they will also learn how their growth and development relates to Earth’s seasonal cycles and begin to understand how all organisms depend on Earth’s limited water supply.

     

    Review the vocabulary for this domain, (pg. 5 of the Domain 6 Teacher's Guide).  Words written in bold have a corresponding word work activity.  Students are not expected to master these words the first time they are exposed to them, but through repeated exposure, they should acquire a good understanding.

     

    Please reference the supplemental guide for lesson plans with scaffolded instruction.  This could be used for EL or DL students, as well as for students who are struggling with understanding the content.  These lessons could be taught whole group or small group.

     

    Trade Books recommended for Read Alouds throughout the Domain can be found on pp. 7-9 of your Domain 6 Teacher's Guide.  Websites that align to the domain can be found on pg. 9 of the Teacher's Guide.  These lists can also be found in the Teacher Resource pages at the end of the Guide.

  • Week 1: February 5

    Domain

    3

    Lesson

    12 - Part A

    12 - Part B

    DR

    DA

    CA

    Assessment

    Domain Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week students will finish learning about Alexander the Great. Then, they will complete a Domain Review activity, the Domain Assessment and a Culminating Activity.

     

    Lesson 12: This lesson is the second part of the story about Alexander the Great. This lesson discusses when Alexander the Great conquered Persia, Egypt and part of India. This lesson corresponds with the Domain Assessment question on how Alexander got his name, so make sure your students have this understanding at the end of the lesson. This lesson also gives a lot of insight into Alexander's personality, which could help students answer the question on the person they would want to meet and why. Prioritize your questions to this focus.

     

    Domain Review: Choose a review activity based on student misconceptions you have observed throughout the domain. Choose an activity that addresses those misconceptions and will also be covered on the Domain Assessment.

     

    Domain Assessment: Complete as is. Pull students to complete in small groups, if necessary. In addition, this Domain Assessment has 4 parts, so you may want to give students a "brain break" in the middle.

     

    Culminating Activities: Choose a Culminating Activity that addresses students' misconceptions, according to the results of the Domain Assessment. you can have the whole class complete one Culminating Activity, or you can choose to have students work in small groups on an activity that meets their needs.

  • Week 2: February 12

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    1-Part A

    1-Part B

    2-Part A

    2-Part B

    3-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:  This week students will begin learning about ancient Greek myths that originated in Ancient Greece and be introduced to a few of the 12 main gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus and their contributions.

     

    Lesson 1: Reacquaint students with what they learned about gods and goddesses from Grade 1.  This can be done by creating a K-W-L chart to activate prior knowledge.  You will need a world map and will refer to this throughout the entire domain.  Make sure that Greece is labeled and the map is posted.  Inform students that the myths that they will be hearing about over the next several days originated in, or were first told in Ancient Greece.  Create a Character Chart to be used throughout the entire domain.  Use it to introduce and record relevant information about each character as they are introduced in each read aloud throughout the domain.  Create student journals to be used each day using Instructional Master 3B-1. You will need at least 10 pages per student journal.

     

    Lesson 2:   Remind students that the myths they will be hearing about originated in, or were first told in, Ancient Greece.  Create a T chart to compare the differences between gods/goddesses and human beings.  In preparation for the read aloud, you may want to identify bright markers to stick on the posters of the characters that will be introduced so students can refer to them.  Add to your character chart as each character is introduced in the read aloud.  It will be very important to discuss the terms mortal and immortal.  Prompt students to listen carefully to find out which character is mortal/immortal.

     

    Lesson 3: Several gods/goddesses will be in today's read aloud.  Review what students remember about Zeus, Poseidon, Ares, Aphrodite, and Demeter to prepare them for the read aloud.  Review what a moral is with students.  Set the purpose for the read aloud by telling students to listen carefully to identify whether this myth explains something in nature or teaches a moral lesson.

  • Week 3: February 19

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    3-Part B

    4-Part A

    4-Part B

    5-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:  This week students will continue to learn about ancient Greek myths that originated in Ancient Greece and be introduced to more of the 12 main gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus and their contributions.  They will also look at characteristics of myths.

     

    Lesson 3:  Make sure to do a Think-Pair-Share with students.  The events in this read-aloud can lead to some rich discussion.  Be sure to remind students of discussion guidelines and give them response prompts or discussion stems (anchor charts) if necessary.

     

    Lesson 4: As students are reviewing the Greek gods/goddesses that they learned about in previous read alouds, have them refer back to their journals to retrieve information.  Make sure that students are adding important information to their journals, especially the supernatural powers that the gods/goddesses possess.  Students will be working in groups to create a tapestry that retells the myth that was just read.  Make sure to review or introduce expectations for working in groups.  It would be helpful to create or review an anchor chart for group work expectations.  Make sure students discuss a plan for creating their illustrations before they begin to draw.

     

    Lesson 5:  Today, groups will take the illustrations that they created in the previous lesson to create their tapestry.  Allow them a few minutes to meet with their groups to discuss how they will present their illustration.  Create a Greek Myths Chart to review the different myths that students have heard thus far.  Students should be able to recall/be knowledgeable about all of the information on the chart.    You can refer to this chart throughout the domain and add more myths as they are introduced.  Also, make sure you are adding to the Character Chart after a new character is introduced. Make sure to discuss how Greek myths do not always involve supernatural gods and goddesses, but can also include humans, heroes and mythical characters.  Make sure to engage students in a Think-Pair-Share with a partner.

  • Week 4: February 26

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    5-Part B

    6-Part A

    6-Part B

    PP

    7-Part A

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week, students will look at Greek Myths that involve humans, heroes and mythical creatures. They will also determine the characters, setting and plot. The Pausing Point will occur this week, providing an opportunity for students to display the knowledge they've retained thus far in the domain.

     

    Lesson 5: Before having students write in their journals, have a discussion to review the characters and events from the read aloud. For the extension activity, students will be reviewing the events from the myth and identify what happened first and second. Use Instructional Master 5B-2 to create a Chart prior to the start of today's lesson. You can also use the Instructional Master 5B-2 as an assessment, instead.

     

    Lesson 6: Review the Greek myth from the previous lesson. Students can access facts from their students journals for this discussion.  Make sure to remind students that myths are fictional stories that try to explain events or things in nature, teach a moral lesson, and/or entertain listeners. They should be encouraged to think about what the myth is trying to do as they listen to it being read aloud. Students should be able to recall how The Aegean Sea got its name. Yesterday's read aloud and the one for today both contain sad events, which is why emphasizing the fictional aspect of myths today is also important. Be sure to do the Syntactic Awareness Activity extension in conjunction with the complex text presented within the read-aloud. When introducing the activity make sure to model expectations, model with the help of a student, and have students practice with each other before they begin to engage in the task in pairs.

     

    Pausing Point: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

     

    Lesson 7: As you are reviewing with students what they have learned, refer to the Greek Myths Chart. This is a perfect opportunity to add any important details that you omitted to the Greek Myths Chart and make sure the Characters Chart is updated.

  • Week 5: March 5

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    7-Part B

    8-Part A

    8-Part B

    9-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This week, students will continue to learn about ancient Greek Myths, focusing on characters, setting and plot.  They will also begin the planning and drafting stages of creating their own Greek Myths.

     

    Lesson 7:   As students prepare to plan, it would be helpful to create an anchor chart which outlines the key elements of a fictional story and specific characteristics of a Greek myth (characters, setting, plot) that they can refer to as they start the writing process for their own Greek myth.  Students could benefit from having you model creating a plan for your Greek myth.  This will provide them with an exemplar model to refer to.  You may choose to do a model with a small group of students that need more support or with the whole group.

     

    Lesson 8: Start the lesson by using the image cards to help review the events of Hercules in yesterday's read aloud. During the read aloud, refer back to the world map and point out where Nemea and Delphi are as Hercules travels there. Students should be able to describe Hercules based on what he endured and overcame during his journey.  As students are sharing out from the Think-Pair-Share, use response prompts/discussion stems (anchor chart) to support them.  From your planning exemplar, model how to create your first draft.  You can do this with a small group or the whole class depending on need.

     

    Lesson 9:   During the word work activity, make sure everyone knows the definition of "insisted."  Students can do a Turn & Talk to share sentences using the word before they work on the Drawing/Writing activity independently.

  • Week 6: March 12

    Domain

    4

    Lesson

    9-Part B

    10-Part A

    10-Part B

    10-DR

    10-DA

    Assessment

    Domain Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:  This week, students will prepare for, then complete, the final Domain Assessment.  They will also be publishing and presenting the own Greek Myths.

     

    Lesson 9: Students will be editing their Greek Myths in today's lesson.  To support students with the editing process, you may want to model using the editing checklist (Instructional Masters 9B-2) on your own piece of writing.  Model your expectations for peer editing with the help of a student before they begin to engage in the task in pairs.

     

    Lesson 10:  Make sure your Greek Myths and Characters Charts are completely updated as you add today's myth and characters to the charts.  Also, you can add a writing component to the word work activity.  Students can write about something that they "resisted" and use antonyms of the word in a sentence, as well.  Remember, you can make these activities your own.

     

    Domain Review:  You should spend this day reviewing and reinforcing the material from this domain.  You can have the students do any combination of the activities provided in either whole-group or small group settings.  If the review activities are happening in small groups, the teacher should move to the different stations as students rotate to ensure that they cover them all.  Add a writing accountability piece to the Sequencing Events activity.

     

    Domain Assessment:  Feel free to complete the assessment throughout the course of a given day.  Part I (vocabulary assessment) is divided into two sections:  the first assesses domain-related vocabulary and the second assesses academic vocabulary.  Parts II and III of the assessment addresses the core content targeted in Greek Myths.

  • Week 7: March 19

    Domain

    4

    6

    Lesson

    Domain 4, 10-CA

    Domain 6, 1-Part A

    1-Part B

    2-Part A

    2-Part B

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:  This week, students will learn about the cycle of daytime and nighttime and discuss what causes the different seasons.

     

    Culminating Activity:  Choose activities based on students' performance on the Domain Assessment.  Students who didn't perform well on the assessment should complete remediation tasks while the rest of the class participates in enrichment activities.  You can set up a variety of tasks throughout the room for students to complete based on needs.

     

    Domain 6, Lesson 1:  Reacquaint students with what they learned about cycles in nature in K and 1st grade and the two ways that the Earth moves.  Remind students that every cycle has a starting point, and the cycle always comes back to the starting point before starting again.  Create an anchor chart displaying the cycle of daytime and nighttime.  This chart will provide additional visual support to students. The 2nd extension activity requires a globe and a flashlight.  If students are struggling to describe the cycle of daytime and nighttime, this activity will really support those visual learners in your classroom.

     

    Lesson 2:  Create a Seasons chart with chart paper. Before the read aloud, activate students' prior knowledge by filling in parts of the chart that they have already learned about. You will refer back to this chart for the Extension Activity.  Use Image Cards 1-4 and Posters 1 & 2 to help students remember what they learned.   Be sure to remind students of discussion guidelines and give them response prompts or discussion stems (anchor charts) if necessary before they begin the discussion portion of word work activity.

  • Week 8: April 2

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    3-Part A

    3-Part B

    4-Part A

    4-Part B

    5-Part A

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Lesson 3:  In this lesson, students will be learning about the seasonal cycle.  Having students pretend to do the two movements of the Earth (rotation and revolution) will be very helpful to those students that are having a difficult time understanding those concepts.  Also, displaying the image cards as you describe and review those movements will be beneficial.  Use a globe to point out where the equator is, the two hemispheres and the different regions as you refer to them.  Make sure the students are able to explain what causes the seasons and what receives the most direct, intense sunlight because this will come on on the Domain Assessment.  Also, students will need to know when animals migrate.

     

    Lesson 4:   In this lesson, students will learn about how the seasons affect things in nature.  They will also learn about the life cycle of a flowering plant.  Feel free to pull up a YouTube or Brainpop Jr. video to help strengthen students' understanding of a plant's life cycle before they begin the sequencing extension activity.

     

    Lesson 5:  Refer back to the definition of "cycle" as you prepare students for today's lesson.  Students will be learning about the life cycle of a tree today and comparing it to the life cycle of a sunflower.  Students will need to be able to name the stages of a tree' s in the Domain Assessment, so spend some time here making sure that students can describe the cycle.

  • Week 9: April 9

    Domain

    6

    Lesson

    5-Part B

    PP

    6-Part A

    Assessment

    Pausing Point

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: This Pausing Point will occur this week, providing an opportunity for students to display the knowledge they've retained thus far in the domain.

     

    Lesson 5:  In today's lesson, you will create a Venn Diagram so that students can compare and contrast the life cycle of a tree to the life cycle of a sunflower.  It will be helpful to use the image cards from both life cycles to help students recall the similarities and differences.  You can also have students refer back to Lesson 4's Extension activity of sequencing the life cycle of a sunflower plant as a resource.

     

    Pausing Point: Begin with the Student Performance Task Assessment, following it, select any additional activities that you deem necessary for student success. Activities can be conducted in either whole group or small group settings.

     

    Lesson 6: In today's lesson, students will be learning about the life cycle of a chicken. In previous lessons, they learned about life cycles that began with seeds.  Now, they can synthesize their learning about those life cycles by examining how a chicken begins as an egg.  In the Domain Assessment, students will be expected to describes the different stages of a chicken's life cycle. You may want to show a YouTube video of this cycle to help students retain this information.

Skills

  • Skills Overview

    Skills Overview Q3

     

    Notes to Teacher:

    Whenever the lesson suggests that the teacher display materials (such as modeling a worksheet), or whenever we refer to the blackboard, please choose the most convenient and effective method of reproducing and displaying the material for all to see. This may include making a transparency of the material and using an overhead projector, scanning the page and projecting it on a Smartboard, or writing the material on chart paper or a whiteboard.

  • Week 1: February 5

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    5 - Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 5: Prior to this lesson, remove three or four leaves from each branch of the /ie/ Spelling Tree. For words spelled with ‘i’, be sure to remove both one-syllable and multi-syllable words. You will use these leaves for review today and will reattach them during the lesson. Add a new branch to the Spelling Tree, labeling it ‘igh’, and write the following words on leaves to add to the tree during the lesson: light, bright, high, night, fight, fright, and sight. See the Pausing Point for additional instructional resources for the

    /ie/ sound and its spellings. Following the spelling assessment, you may find it helpful to use the template provided at the end of this lesson to analyze students’ mistakes. The spelling analysis sheet will help you to understand any patterns beginning to develop or persisting among individual students.

     

    Lesson 6: Prior to the lesson, add another branch to the /ie/ Spelling Tree, labeling it ‘y’ and prepare the following leaves for the Spelling Tree /ie/: my, by, why, shy,  fy, dry | er, near | by, butt | er |  fly, supp | ly. You will also need to write three columns on the board with the headings: /ar/, /or/, and /er/. Under the /er/ heading create the following subheadings: ‘er’, ‘ur’, and ‘ir’. Write the spelling words under the appropriate columns. (You may wish to refer to Worksheet 6.1 for a sample template for this chart.) Following the /ie/ Sound and Its Spellings activity, see the Pausing Point for additional instructional resources for the /ie/ sound and its spellings. Before teaching the Changing ‘y’ to ‘i’ and Adding –es activity it's important to understand that the  addition of –s to a verb in a sentence occurs in order to ensure subject- verb agreement. It is not necessary for second graders to know the name of this concept at this time. The focus in this lesson is on making sure students understand the spelling rule about the need to change ‘y’ to ‘i’ and then add –es, whenever the /s/ sound or letter ‘s’ is added to a word ending in ‘y.’

     

    Lesson 7: Before the lesson write the sentences listed on p. 56 on the board (do not include the answers in parentheses).

     

    Lesson 8: Before the lesson write the following words on leaves for the /oe/ Spelling Tree: old, told, bold, colt, roll, stroll, most, post. In preparation for the Close Reading activity, you may find yourself reviewing partner work expectations with students. During the actual Close Reading activity you may not have time to complete the provided worksheet. It can be used during the lesson if time permits or used at a later time within the unit.

  • Week 2: February 12

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    10 - Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 9: In preparation for this lesson you will need to add an additional branch to the existing /oe/ Spelling Tree. Label this branch ‘ow’. In addition, you should prepare leaves with the following words: slow, snow, grow, throw, glow, yell | ow, win | dow, el | bow, own | ers. The sentences listed on p. 71 also need to be written on the board before today's lesson begins. While completing the /oe/ Sound and Its Spellings activity, it's important to point out that bow may be pronounced as /b/ /ow/, as in, “The boy bowed to the queen,” or as /b/ /oe/, as in, “Tie a bow in your shoelace.” Today's Read Time text takes place in New York City. Lesson 2 of the Teacher's Guide contains information about the manner in which New York City is divided into boroughs, as well as information about the subway system. You may wish to review this information before reading “The Subway.”

     

    Lesson 10: Before the lesson begins write the word pairs listed on p. 77 on the board. Use the provided template to analyze student errors on the Spelling Assessment. While doing the Regular and Irregular Singular and Plural Nouns activity with students, you may want to point out to students that the /l/ sound is not pronounced in the words half—halves and calf—calves even though they include the letter ‘l’.

     

    Lesson 11: Before this you will need to prepare a new Spelling Tree for the /ee/ sound. Label the trunk of the tree /ee/ and then add eight branches, with the longest branch on the bottom labeled as ‘y’; the following branches should go in this order, from longest to shortest: ‘e’, ‘ee’, ‘ea’, ‘ie’, ‘ey’, ‘e_e’, followed by odd ducks. In addition, you will need to write the words on p.84 on leaves for the Spelling Tree. Do not underline or bold the spellings on these leaves as students will do that as part of today’s exercise. Remember the syllable divisions are provided for your quick reference, if needed, to assist students with chunking. Please do not indicate syllable division on the leaves either. There are additional activity within the Pausing Point that aligns with the /ee/ Sound and Its Spellings activity.

     

    Lesson 12: Prior to beginning this lesson, if possible, bring in a box of brand-name children’s cereal and a generic or store brand of cereal for comparing and contrasting. Alternatively, you could use commercials for various children’s products available on the Internet.

     You will also need to prepare a copy of Worksheets 12.2 and 12.3 to display during the lesson.

     Finally, write the headings on p. 92 and the sentences on p.93 on the board for the Grammar portion of this lesson. For today's Writing activity, it's totally ok for students to choose a different topic as the subject of their persuasive letter to the principal.

  • Week 3: February 19

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    13

    14

    15

    Assessment

    15 - Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 13: Before this lesson prepare Worksheets 13.2 and 13.3 for display. Also, write the sentences on p. 98 on the board.

     

    Lesson 14: In this lesson, students will work in pairs to write persuasive letters on various topics. Intentionally determine student partnerships before this lesson. Also, write the  writing prompts on p. 103 on index cards or slips of paper, which will be distributed during the lesson. Feel free to add or substitute different prompts; you may also want to make multiple copies of some prompts, so several student pairs have the opportunity to write about the same topic. The sentences found on pp. 103 & 104 need to be written on the board as well. There are additional verb activities within the Pausing Point that align with the Recognize To Be as a Verb activity.

     

    Lesson 15: If you choose to have students work with a partner during the Close Reading activity, intentionally group students based off their abilities, needs, and what they're able to contribute within a partnership.

  • Week 4: February 26

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    16

    17

    18

    19

    Notes:

    Lesson 16: Today's small group component calls for you to determine whether students need to finish their persuasive letter, or if everyone's in a good place and Skills Groups can occur.

     

    Lesson 17: You will use the /ee/ Spelling Tree you created in Lesson 11 in this lesson. This tree should already have two branches labeled with the spelling ‘y’ and the spelling ‘ey’. In addition, write the  words on p.119 on leaves. There are additional tricky spelling "y" activities within the Pausing Point that support the /ee/ Sound and Its Spellings activity.

     

    Lesson 18: It's important to remember, when teaching the Changing ‘y’ to ‘i’ and Adding –es activity, that the addition of ‘s’ to a verb in a sentence occurs in order to ensure subject-verb agreement. It is not necessary for second graders to know the name of this process at this time. The focus in this lesson is on making sure students understand the spelling rule about the need to change ‘y’ to ‘i’ and then add –es, whenever the /s/ sound or letter ‘s’ is added to a word ending in ‘y’.

     

    Lesson 19: Select the Wiggle Cards you'll use for this lesson beforehand, they should all contain action verbs. The Grammar templates on p.137 also needed to be written on the board.

  • Week 5: March 5

    Unit

    4

    Lesson

    20

    21

    22

    23

    Notes:

    Lesson 20: Today's Grammar activity  is a review of all content taught in this unit thus far. You can complete it with the class, or give directions and have students complete it independently or with the help of a partner.

     

    Lesson 21: Before this lesson, you will need to add an additional branch labeled ‘al’ to the /aw/ Spelling Tree you created in Unit 3. You will also need to write the words on p.145 on spelling leaves prior to the lesson: hallway, wallpaper, install, salt, also, always, false, walnut, walrus, Walter, walk, talk.

     

    Lesson 22: Once you finish all the assessments in Lessons 22–25, we strongly recommend examining student progress to consider any adjustments that may need to be made to Skills Groups and the content addressed within your Scope & Sequence.

     

    Lesson 23: For these next three days, lessons will include a combination of assessment and review activities. You should divide your class into thirds and administer Student Performance Task Assessment 1: Oral Reading Fluency Assessment on a one-to-one basis to approximately one-third of your students each day. Students should be working on Pausing Point activities or in student workstations during this time.

    Assessment

    20 - Spelling Assessment

     

    22 - Reading Comprehension  Assessment

    Grammar Assessment

     

    23 - Oral Reading Fluency Assessment

  • Week 6: March 12

    Unit

    4

    5

    Lesson

    24

    25

    PP

    1

    Notes:

    Lesson 24: You will administer the Student Performance Task Assessment 2: Word Identification and Decoding Skills Assessment to the entire class today, as well as continue your one-on-one Oral Reading Fluency Assessments.

     

    Lesson 25: Today's the last day to finish your Oral Reading Fluency Assessment.

     

    Pausing Point: Take this time to review material presented in Unit 4. Different students need added practice with different objectives, have students focus on what they need via small groups. Be sure to pull from Pausing Point Activities, and the Assessment/Remediation Guide.

     

    Lesson 1: In this lesson, you will introduce students to the skill of alphabetizing words by the first letter. You may want to have several different versions of dictionaries, hard copy and electronic, available to reinforce for students a reason to learn this skill. Additionally, some books with an index and a set of encyclopedias would be good to have available. If you do not have a set of encyclopedias in your classroom, perhaps the media specialist would welcome a class trip to the media center.

     

    Prior to this lesson, write all of the spelling words on index cards or sentence strips. After introducing the words, you will fold the index cards so only the first letter of each word is visible to students. If you use index cards, you might find it helpful to paper clip them as you remove them from the board during the spelling portion of the lesson, so they stay folded over during the exercise. Also, write the alphabet vertically on the board for student reference for several days to come. For space sake, this can also be done on an anchor chart. Additionally, in this lesson you will use the /u/ Spelling Tree created in Unit 3, to which you will add three new branches. Two long branches are for ‘o’ and ‘ou’. Prepare a much shorter branch for ‘o_e’.

     

    Last, prepare the following leaves to add to the /u/ Tree: public, subject, tantrum, mother, brother, cousin, touch, some, and love. Remind students that they already know ‘o_e’ stands for the /oe/ sound, but now they are learning a new sound for this spelling during the /u/ Sound and Its Spellings activity.

    Assessment

    24 - Oral Reading Fluency Assessment

    Word Identification and Decoding Skills Assessment

     

    25 - Oral Reading Fluency Assessment

     

    Pausing Point

  • Week 7: March 19

    Unit

    5

    Notes:

    Lesson 2: Prior to this lesson write the following words on leaves to add to the /u/ Spelling: son, cover, month, money, front, wonder, won, dozen, crunchy, trumpet, husband, thunder.

     The Tricky Word from can now be seen as part of a larger spelling pattern. After today's lesson it should be removed from your Tricky Word wall.  Be sure to refer to the Pausing Point for additional resources to use while teaching ‘o’ > /u/ if students had difficulty with today's  /u/ Sound and Its Spellings activity.

     

    Lesson 3: Before today's lesson write the following words on leaves to add to the Spelling Tree: done, none, some, come, love, shove, glove, cousins, country, young, touch, southern.

     As you complete the  /u/ Sound and Its Spellings activity remind students they have already learned ‘o_e’ stands for /oe/ as in drove, rose, and hose, and ‘ou’ sounds like /ou/ as in shout, ounce, and bounce. During the Reading Time activity remind students that ‘ie’ is a tricky spelling, either representing the sound /ie/ as in pie or /ee/ as in thief. This will help them when decoding. The Tricky Word some can now be seen as part of a larger spelling pattern. Following this lesson, it should be moved to the decodable word wall.

     

    Lesson 4: The goal for today's Grammar activity is not to have students memorize the definitions for the adjectives presented, but rather they recognize ‘ous’ as a suffix that signals a word is an adjective. Today's Close Reading activity is significantly more complex than ones of the past. Students are going to have to reflect on the author’s purpose in using multiple-meaning words. Although the particular focus is on the multiple-meaning word well in this chapter, there are other multiple-meaning words that may be used to reinforce the concept that words can have more than one meaning. It is up to your discretion, based on students’ needs and time constraints, to further discuss these words.

     

    Lesson 5: Following the /u/ Sound and Its Spellings activity, use the Pausing Point for additional instructional activities for the /u/ sound and its spellings.

    Lesson

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Assessment

    5 - Spelling Assessment

  • Week 8: April 2

    Unit

    5

    Notes:

    Lesson 6: For this lesson you will need to utilize the vertical alphabet you used to previously practice alphabetical order. The Spelling Words also need to be written on index cards. Write the words listed on p.47 on index cards or paper for the Baseball Game review of spellings. Finally, the words in the sentences on p.48 need to be written on index cards for the Grammar activity. Write one word on each card. Capitalize the first word of each sentence and add the period after the last word in each sentence. Students may ask what the remaining words in the sentence are called during today's Grammar activity. We will not teach articles, adverbs or other parts of speech at this point; however, if students ask about them, feel free to give them this information.

     

    Lesson 7: Prior to the lesson, make a simple drawing of two ladders on the board. At the top of each ladder write, “Winner!”

    Additionally, you will need to prepare a Spelling Tree for /ə/. For today, you will need to prepare two branches for the tree. One of the branches will be the ‘a’ branch and the other will be the ‘e’ branch. Prepare the following leaves for the ‘a’ branch: about, alike, afraid, China, America, and appear. Also, prepare these leaves for the ‘e’ branch: debate, appetite, decide, and category. You might want to think about using some of the students’ names to illustrate the /ə/, such as: Linda, Martha, Evan, Adam, Steven, and Jeremy. In this lesson, you will give a teacher-led presentation on schwa. Then you will present a  fictional read-aloud about schwa called “The Spelling Spoilers.” Be sure to read the story before presenting it to the class as a read-aloud. You will be asked to customize the text in some places, e.g., filling in your name, the name of your school, and the name of your community.

     Be intentional when creating teams for the Review Subject and Predicate activity. The teams should be as heterogeneous as possible. If the, a, what, and was are understood as containing the /ə/ sound, then they are no longer tricky and can be removed from the class' Tricky Word wall.

     

    Lesson 8: In CKLA, the /u/ sounds are not called schwa sounds. It is not important for students to differentiate whether a spelling is an /u/ or a schwa sound. What is important, however, is that they can read and write the words correctly. Please see the Pausing Point for additional instructional activities for the /u/ and /ə/ sound.

     

    Lesson 9: In this lesson, students will review the contractions they learned in Unit 2. Prior to this lesson, prepare index cards according to the chart shown on p.73. (If you still have your index cards from Unit 2, you may use them again). See the Pausing Point for additional activities that support today's Grammar activity on subjects and predicates.

    Lesson

    6

    7

    8

    9

  • Week 9: April 9

    Unit

    5

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    10 - Spelling Assessment

    Notes:

    Lesson 10: Prior to today’s lesson, make a photocopy of the sentences on p.78 for use in the Grammar Review game. Cut them apart and place them in a container.  Also, make two copies of the chart in the Parts of Speech section of this lesson for the Parts of Speech review. Determine the student groupings for the Grammar Review game beforehand.

     

    Lesson 11: Prior to the lesson, prepare the spelling words on index cards in order to teach alphabetizing. However, this time you will not fold over the letters on the cards. Also, decide whether you will create a new Spelling Tree for /ə/ + /l/, or whether you will instead just add new branches to the /ə/ Tree. See the Introduction of this Teacher's Guide for more information. In either case, you will need three new branches, one each for ‘al’, ‘il’, and ‘ul’. Also prepare these leaves for the tree: helpful, cheerful, wonderful, animal, metal, total, royal, principal, typical, normal, practical, signal, pencil, evil, April, devil, fossil, nostril. Please note the sound combination of /ə / + /l/ is not on the Vowel Code Flip Book or the Individual Code Chart.

     

    Lesson 12: Before today’s lesson, prepare leaves for the Spelling Trees with the following words: general, stencil, hospital, normal, tonsils, equal, petal, tropical, emergency, civil, several, local, amount, legal, rental, pedal, personal, come, touch, love, son, mother.

     These leaves will be used for students completing independent work. Students will divide the word into syllables and tell you on which tree branch it belongs. If you feel you have students who are unable to complete this task on their own, you may want to create duplicates of the leaves. Students can then be told to find the other person in the class who has the same word on their leaf and they can complete the task together. You will be asking students to attach leaves to both the /u/ and the /ə/ Spelling Trees, as well as the /ə/ + /l/ Spelling Tree (if it was created). If you are unable to display multiple Spelling Trees, you may ask students to orally state to which Spelling Tree the leaf would be attached. For example, the student might say, “This leaf belongs to the /ə/ Tree.” You can then add the leaves at a later time.