Q3 3rd Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

 

Module 3B

Topic: Analyzing Narratives and Supporting Opinions

Wolves in Fiction and Fact

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 3 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 1-8 and Lexiles 140-925. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: February 6

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RL.3.1, SL.3.1

    Lesson 2: RL.3.1, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.7

    Lesson 3: RL.3.1, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.7

    Lesson 4: RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.7

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Multiple standards are addressed in Lessons 1-4. Be mindful of how and what needs to emphasized as the ideas will carry across the week. Also, in advance, put students into heterogeneous groups for unit 1.

     

    Lesson 1 Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk

    Lesson 3 Instructional Protocol: Back to Back, Face to Face

     

    Protocols Resources

     

    Lesson 1: Review the Mystery Gallery Walk in Lesson 1 in advance for suggestions about how to set up the “tour station stops” for students to visit (many materials). Consider: stations of wolf artifacts (pelts, teeth, bones, sculptures, etc.). This is optional. You can check the Field Museum-- they have boxes you can bring to your classroom. Review the Unit 1 Recommended Texts list and work with a media specialist to locate a variety of independent reading books for students to choose from in Lesson 1 (that align to the Module's topic).

     

    Lesson 2: Give students time to read independently to make accommodations for previous night's homework. They begin sketching important details from the story. Make sure you model how to do this in under a minute so it doesn't dominate the lesson. Consider numbering the pages of the student copies of the book and prepping vocab flash cards ahead of time. Review text dependent questions and consider modeling the process before sending them off to do it in groups (Fishbowl, TPS, Think Aloud). Finally, students will be asked to complete a fluency rubric for homework. For more information on how to teach fluency, look at this EngageNY resource.

     

    Lesson 3: Similar to Lesson 2. Remember to make adjustments in the lesson to allow time for students to read independently and complete the fluency rubric if they have not done so for homework. Review Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Consider creating an anchor chart they can reference.

     

    Lesson 4: Similar to previous lessons. Some advance material preparation needed. Leave time for independent reading.

  • Week 2: February 13

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    1

    Assessment

    Biweekly #1

    Biweekly is Lesson 5, Mid-Unit Assessment

    Question 5

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 5 (Biweekly 1): RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.7

    Lesson 6: L.3.4+4a+4b, RF.3.4, SL.3.1

    Lesson 7: RL.3.3, W.3.1, RF.3.4

    Lesson 8: RL.3.3, L.3.4+4a+4c+4d, W.3.1, RF.3.4

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Lessons 6 and 7 serve as gradual release, allowing adequate opportunity to model and have students share and refine their thinking in groups. In Lessons 8 and 9, students complete similar tasks more independently, with new fables. Outside of lesson 6, be sure to do a quick fluency check (see Unit 1 Overview, Preparation and Materials for more details). This will help students refine their fluency goals (which they set during Lesson 2) based on their progress up to this point. In later lessons, students will be expected to complete shared writing work more independently, so it is important to provide a strong foundational model for them in lesson 7. Be sure to score and return students’ mid-unit assessments before Lesson 8.

     

    Lesson 5: is the Mid Unit Assessment. Use Question 5 as the biweekly assessment.

     

    Lesson 6: Consider creating an anchor chart of affixes for students to refer to, after they have been introduced to them. Option to have students work in partnerships, rather than groups, to determine meaning of vocabulary words.

     

    Lesson 7: Allow for time to model how to use the character analysis chart. Students may need smaller chunks of reading and predetermined stopping points at which you unpack why you filled the boxes in a specific manner. Then, use TPS to guide them through the rest. Students may need a model on how to write a concluding sentence to an opinion paragraph, if this is a new skill. Consider making an opinion anchor chart they can refer to through the unit. Make sure you get to the opinion writing portion of the lesson, since that is the genre of writing that will be assessed in A3. Make adjustments for students that may not read the night before or complete work.  Many of the assignments can be used as independent work or centers while you pull small groups.

     

    Lesson 8: There are several objectives (1 reading, most are language and writing). Consider having vocab posted ahead of time and give students a short time after lessons or during transitions to copy words on cards. This will give you some instructional time back. Be sure to have a personal whiteboard and whiteboard marker for each student to use during Lesson 8. If students need additional support for opinion writing have a mini-guided writing lesson using a previously read text on the wolf. Make sure components of opinion writing is posted.

    Standards Assessed

    RI.3.3

  • Week 3: February 20

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: RL.3.3, L.3.4, W.3.1, RF.3.4

    Lesson 10: RL.3.3, L.3.4, W.3.1

    Lesson 11: RF.3.4

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Make adjustments for students that may not read the night before or complete work. Many of the assignments can be used as independent work or centers if you are prepared to pull small groups.

     

    Lesson 9: Similar to lessons 6-7. Students will be working in groups for the majority of this lesson. If need be, you can pull a small group that needs extra support.

     

    Lesson 10-11: End of Unit Assessment. Consider using portions of lesson 10 as centers or small group work.  While students are reading at their seats independently, use the texts from Lesson 11 to conduct the fluency assessments.  This will give you some data about how to support students when reading independently.

    Standards Assessed

    RL.3.3

    L.3.4

    W.3.1

    RF.3.4

  • Week 4: February 27

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Biweekly is from Lesson 4, the Paragraph Writing Accordion graphic organizer, 2nd Detail & Explanation boxes. The biweekly will be the second Detail and Explanation boxes of the graphic organizer - please have students complete this second Detail and Explanation boxes independently, not with partners.

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Lessons 1-4 build on each other with the end goal of Lessons 3 and 4 is that students to be able to answer the focus question posed during Work Time A in lesson 3, “What does the author mean when he says ‘wolves are social animals’? Explain what wolves do that make them social animals.” Students are given the opportunity to do so in Lesson 4.

     

    Lessons 2 & 4 Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Lesson 1: You may want to have an anchor chart of the folktales/fables (with visual support) that you read in Unit 1, since students will be asked to compare/contrast those stories with the new informational text. Note that the text-dependent questions are to be used as a whole-class discussion guide, not to be completed as a worksheet. You may want to include visuals on the informational text chart. Be mindful of how you will support students with understanding the guiding question of, "What is the author's point of view on wolves?"

    Adjust for students who may not have completed the homework--give a short amount of time for students to read through pages 5-7 of the text and record unknown words onto notecards. Punch holes in index cards in advance to save time. Review the sample anchor chart so you know where to guide students throughout the unit. During the debrief, the Who Is the Wolf in Fact new anchor chart is introduced. As they did in Unit 1 with the Who Is the Wolf in Fiction anchor chart, students describe “who” the wolf is in fact. This is a routine students will follow throughout this unit, which not only helps them to answer the guiding question for this unit (“Who is the wolf in fact?”), but also will support their work in Unit 3 as they develop their own narrative stories about a day in the life of a wolf.

     

    Lesson 2: Review the Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face protocol.

     

    Lesson 3: Adjust for students who may not have completed homework (In part C of work time, they will find the meaning of unknown words form their homework. You could have them do this using unknown words in their reading for that day.). In this lesson, students are asked to write gist statements on post it notes. You could also use paper bookmarks or a graphic organizer if sticky notes are not available.  At the end of the lesson, students will brainstorm questions they have about the text. You may want to have a place for them to record these questions.

     

    Lesson 4: Note that the text dependent questions are meant to be discussion based. Review "Who is the Wolf in Fact" sample anchor chart from Unit 2, Lesson 2 to see what should be included on your chart. The "Paragraph Writing Accordion" was a graphic organizer used in a module 2A - if your class did not complete that, you may want to quickly model how to use it for students. Biweekly #2 is from this lesson and will be generated from the second Detail and Explanation boxes of the graphic organizer (please have students complete this second Detail and Explanation boxes independently, not with partners as is called out in the lesson plan).

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RI.3.1, RI.3.6

    Lesson 2: RI.3.1, RI.3.4, RI.3.6

    Lesson 3: RI.3.1, RI.3.4

    Lesson 4: RI.3.1, RI.3.4, W.3.2

    Standards Assessed

    RI.3.1, W.3.2

  • Week 5: March 6

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    Mid Unit Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: In lesson 6, students continue to closely read the third section of Face to Face with Wolves, “Life in the Pack.” In Lesson 7, students will closely reread pages 17–19, and in Lesson 8 they will write an informational paragraph responding to the focus question from the close read.

     

    Lesson 8 Instructional Protocol Praise Question Suggest

     

    Protocol Resource

     

    Lesson 5: In this lesson, students take the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment. Students apply what they have learned about reading informational texts by responding to short answer and text-dependent questions about a new

    section from Face to Face with Wolves, “Life in the Pack.” In advance, make sure to post the "Close Readers Do These Things" anchor chart.

     

    Lesson 6: In advance, post several anchor charts that are needed for students to reference throughout the lesson.  For the asking questions work time, consider breaking it up into an "I do, we do, you do" lesson, or identifying a set amount to complete. Also, adjust for students who may have not completed vocabulary cards for homework. Again, you may want to give students a place to record their questions for that portion of this lesson.

     

    Lesson 7: In this lesson, students will closerly read and there is a writing component. Create a rubric and do some modeled writing to help students understand expectations for writing and completing their graphic organizer in partnerships.

     

    Lesson 8: In this lesson, the focus is on writing (see sample paragraph to help with your model). Make sure you provide scaffolds for students to complete the writing components. Have two students model how to orally tell their partner what they will be writing before you have the whole class complete this activity in partnerships. Also, review the Praise-Question-Suggest protocol for the closing of this lesson. Have two students model completing this protocol, as well, before having the whole class do it.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 5: RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.4

    Lesson 6: RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.RI.3.4

    Lesson 7: RI.3.1, RI.3.4, W.3.2, W.3.7, W.3.8

    Lesson 8: W.3.2+2a, W.3.10, L.3.2

    Standards Assessed

    RI.3.1

    RI.3.2

    RI.3.4

  • Week 6: March 13

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: These lessons constitute another 3 lesson close reading sequence that builds to completion of the End of Unit Assessment in lesson 12. The end goal of Lessons 9–11 is for students to be able to answer the focus question posed during Work Time A in Lesson 9, “After reading ‘Making a Comeback,’ what do you know about some of the problems faced by wolves? What are some solutions to these problems?” Students are given the opportunity to do so in Lessons 10 and 11

     

    Lesson 11 Instructional Protocol Praise, Question, Suggest

     

    Protocol Resource

     

    Lesson 9: Again, the text dependent questions in this lesson are meant to be discussion based. This lesson is the first of another three-lesson close reading sequence, just like previous lessons in this unit.

     

    Lesson 10: This lesson has students independently completing the "Paragraph Writing Accordion`" graphic organizer. If your students require scaffolding, you can consider developing an "I do, we do, you do" approach this lessons. You will also want to review the rubric you created in Unit 2, Lesson 7 on expectations for writing in partnerships.

     

    Lesson 11: This is a writing lesson. Review suggestions listed in Unit 2, Lesson 8 in order to be mindful of providing scaffolds to support students. Again, review the Praise-Question-Suggest protocol to be used in the "Closing and Assessment" portion of the lesson.

     

    Lesson 12: This is End of Unit Assessment in which students will read and answer questions about Face to Face with Wolves. Questions 5-6 will be used for Biweekly 3.

    Assessment

    Bi Weekly #3

    Biweekly is Lesson 12, End of Unit Assessment, Questions 5-6

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.4

    Lesson 10: RI.3.1, RI.3.4, W.3.2, W.3.7, W.3.8

    Lesson 11: W.3.2+2a+2b, W.3.10, L.3.2

    Lesson 12: RI.3.2, RI.3.4, RI.3.6, W.3.2, W.3.10

    Standards Assessed

    RI.3.1

    Ri.3.6

  • Week 7: March 20

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    1

    2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Please note that there are only two lessons listed this week due to consideration of PARCC administration. Although your school may not be administering PARCC this week, we wanted to provide flex days for you. Some of the lessons in this Unit covering narrative elements and structure have been cut out due to time constraints. Plan to address these topics as students plan and write their narratives.

     

    Lesson 1: This lesson launches the Performance Task, in which students will write and illustrate a fictional narrative that incorporates facts and details about real wolves that they have been gathering in Units 1 and 2. Students have already seen the Performance Task prompt in Unit 2, but will revisit it in this lesson in preparation for writing their own narratives in this Unit. The narrative, Lon Po Po, can be used as a model for students as they write their own narratives. They will also be introduced to the Narrative Writing Rubric.

     

    Lesson 2: In this lesson, students will choose the problem they are going to write their wolf narrative about, and begin to build a character profile of the main wolf character. They will use the Wolf Character Profile graphic organizer to help them plan. The blank graphic organizer in this lesson already has the problem filled in. Delete that before printing, if you want students to create their own problems. You will need to prepare the "Truth and Fiction Strips" before the lesson.  During the independent work time portions, you may want to pull a small guided writing groups for students who struggle with writing.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: W.3.3

    Lesson 2: W.3.3+3a

  • Week 8: March 27

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    3

    4

    5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Please note that there are only three lessons listed this week due to consideration of ANet administration. During this week, students begin planning their narratives using a model narrative to guide them.

     

    Lesson 3: Give students time to draw a picture of their wolf if they did not complete the homework. Students will use the Model Wolf Narrative first introduced in Unit 2, Lesson 1, to help them begin thinking about character traits for their wolf character. You will need colored pencils for this lesson. If you do not have colored pencils, you can have students code the strengths, special abilities, and weaknesses of Little Foot with symbols. Scaffold students completing their organizers by having them complete a structured Think-Pair-Share of some ideas they have.

     

    Lesson 4: Students analyze the structure of a narrative in preparation for writing their own narratives, by putting strips of a narrative in the correct order. Consider using heterogeneous grouping for this activity to ensure there is at least one student who can read the story strips. Students complete the Narrative Elements Graphic organizer using the Wolf Narrative as a model for completing a graphic organizer for their own wolf narrative.

     

    Lesson 5: Depending on the needs of your students, you may want to scaffold the writing by using more of an "I do, we do, you do" approach, where students complete structured Think-Pair-Shares during the "We do" portion.  You may also want to pull a guided writing group during work time. IMPORTANT: You will need to print the "Narrative Elements Graphic Organizer" from Lesson 4 to use for this lesson. It can be printed from here.

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 3: W.3.3+3a

    Lesson 4: RL.3.2, RL.3.5, W.3.3

    Lesson 5: W.3.3+3a+3d

  • Week 9: April 3

    Module

    3B

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 10: W.3.3+3a+3b+3c+3d

    Lesson 11: L.3.1+1h+1i

    Lesson 12: L.3.1+1g, RL.3.7

    (Lesson 13: W.3.3+3a+3b+3c+3d, W.3.4, W.3.5)

    Standards Assessed

    W.3.3

    L.3.1

    L.3.1h

    L.3.1i

    L.3.1g

    RL.3.7

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: The lesson where students plan their illustrations has been cut due to time constraints, as well as the lesson on how to add dialogue. You may add this in throughout the planning process and/or add these lessons in if you are ahead of pace. Also, students will only have time to write a rough draft of their wolf narratives. Use a writing block or a different time of the day to have students write a final draft. You can view the lessons that have been removed due to time constraints to determine if there are any you would like to include in a different part of your day and/or if you are ahead of pace.

     

    Lesson 10: This is the End of Unit Assessment, in which students are asked to write the first draft of their wolf narratives. However, since we are completing an abbreviated version of this unit, you could change the format of this lesson, so that students are not writing their narrative completely independently.  Consider modeling for students how to turn their graphic organizers into a first draft. Also, scaffold the writing process for them, as appropriate. Some options are having students help each other in pairs and/or conduct a guided writing group. You will need to have given students feedback on their graphic organizers before this lesson. There are some references to work done in previous lessons that were cut from our pacing, so plan accordingly.

     

    Lesson 11: In this lesson, students will be editing their first drafts for conventions. You may want to create an anchor chart on simple, compound and complex sentences for students to refer to.  You may also want to choose another editing point, based on what you see in your students' writing (i.e. capital letters, adding dialogue, etc.) and grade level standards for them to edit for, as well. Students will edit for adjectives and adverbs in Lesson 12.

     

    Lesson 12: This lesson begins with editing for adjectives and adverbs. You may want to create an anchor chart with the parts of speech for students to refer to. This is also where students will draw illustrations to match their narratives. Students will not have had time to plan their drawings previously, so you may want to look back to Lesson 7, which has teaching points for students to think about when drawing. In Lesson 7, students analyze the illustrations in Lon Po Po. You could have students do this quickly to create some criteria for illustrations, before having them draw their own for their narratives.

     

    Lesson 13: Students write the final draft of their narrative. You can have students complete their final drafts during your flex day this week.