Q4 4th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 4: Gathering Evidence and Speaking to Others: Susan B. Anthony, the Suffrage Movement, and the Importance of Voting

In this module, students will read, write, and speak about the topic of voting rights and responsibilities. In the first two units, students will read informational texts that focus on the women’s suffrage movement and the leadership of New Yorker Susan B. Anthony. Specifically, they will read firsthand and secondhand accounts of her arrest and trial for voting in a time when women were outlawed from doing so. Students then read The Hope Chest by Karen Schwabach, a historical fiction novel set in the weeks leading up to the passage of the 19th Amendment. They will continue to examine the idea of leaders of change and explore the theme “making a difference” by collecting evidence on how selected characters make a difference for others. After completing the novel, students will analyze this theme in selected passages of the novel and write an essay using evidence from the text to support their analysis. In the final unit, students will connect the ideas of “leaders of change” and “making a difference” to their own lives by reading about the importance of voting. They will prepare for their performance task, a Public Service Announcement about the importance of voting. To prepare, they will read various informational texts on contemporary voting to build background knowledge and collect evidence for their scripts. They will then write a draft of their script and practice speaking before recording and presenting their Public Service Announcement to peers, their parents, or local high school seniors.

 

ANet Resources

 

Biweekly Short Response Rubric

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 4 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 350-1280. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RI 4.4

    Lesson 2: RI 4.1, RI 4.4

    Lesson 3: RI 4.2

     

    Notes:

    Unit 1:

    Unit 1 will set the stage for the module topic on voting rights, beginning with the women's suffrage movement and how Susan B. Anthony's leadership drove change. Take advantage throughout this module to tie in current events during Morning Meetings, Small Group Instruction, and Homework. This will build coherence around the module topic and provide meaningful connections to the current political climate.

     

    Additional informational texts connected to the topic to support small group instruction include:
    The Suffrage Museum
    The Latino Vote in 2016
    The 2016 South Carolina Primaries

    Ted Cruz's Presidential Announcement

    Hillary Clinton's Presidential Announcement

     

    Weekly Overview:

    Students are introduced to the text of Susan B. Anthony's "On Women's Right to Suffrage". They will be using a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words as well as engage in reading the text in order to be able to summarize as well as determine the main idea of the text.

     

    Lesson 1:

    The first two lessons in this unit introduce the topic, review vocabulary strategies for determining the meaning of unfamiliar words, and build background knowledge around the women's suffrage movement and the leadership of Susan B. Anthony. Students will be exposed to a variety of Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary connected to the topic, so teachers should establish a word wall for this module. Teachers should display the timeline that is introduced on page 269 from The Hope Chest on an anchor chart. Students will be able to reference the timeline throughout the module.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Instructional Protocol: Concentric Circles

    Students practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words after conducting a close read exercise. The central text for Lesson 2 are excerpts from Susan B. Anthony's speech "On Women's Right to the Suffrage". This audible version of this speech is also available here. Consider making the concentric circle activity part of the work time as opposed to closing. This will allow students more time to discuss the text with peers. Be strategic about where students are placed in the concentric circle to support EL and DL students.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Instructional Protocol: Think-Pair-Share Discussion

    Students practice summarizing the informational text "The Vote" and determine the main idea using specific details from the text. We recommend implementing the "What Makes a Quality Summary?" anchor chart during this lesson as opposed to Lesson 4 to hone in on summarizing skills. This will prepare students for Lessons 4/5 and will give students more time to complete activities around vocabulary from Lesson 4 and their ability to summarize the central text in Lesson 5. Text clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. Consider using the text-dependent questions provided in Lesson 5 as an exit ticket to assess student learning.

  • Week 2: April 23

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4 / 5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly 1

    Lesson 6, Mid-Unit Assessment, Part 2

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4: RI 4.4

    Lesson 5: RI 4.2

    Lesson 6: RI 4.2, RI 4.4

    Lesson 7: RI 4.2, RI 4.4, L 4.4

    Lesson 8: RI 4.6

    Notes:

    Weekly overview: In this unit students summarize informational texts that have a variety of text structures. In lesson 4, students begin working with a longer article that has a sequential text structure similar to “The Vote” (which they read in Lesson 3). Students will work with this text across Lessons 4 and 5. Here, they first break the text into manageable chunks in order to find the gist of the whole text. They also look more closely at academic and domain-specific words, which will help them understand this more complex text. Then, in Lesson 5, students continue digging into the same text, answering text-dependent questions and summarizing. The heart of Lessons 7–9 is RI.4.6. The two texts used in this assessment were selected for students to read and compare on-demand and independently.

     

    Lessons 4 & 5:

    Lessons 4 and 5 have been merged as students grapple with the same text "Order in the Court". Omit finding the gist activity in Lesson 4 to focus on identifying the main idea and using context clues.

     

    Lesson 6:

    This is a mid-unit assessment. Part 2 will serve as the biweekly assessment and will assess RI.4.2.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Students will conduct a close read of an article published in the New York Times called "Miss Susan B. Anthony Fined $100 and Costs for Illegal Voting" and determine the main idea. The text is from 1873 and will be presented in original form so it is best to make large copy for students to read. The informational texts in Lessons 7 and 8 also present a great opportunity to address RI 4.8 as students can demonstrate how authors treat similar topics differently.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Instructional Protocol: Think-Pair-Share

    In this lesson, students begin to compare firsthand and secondhand accounts of Susan B. Anthony's trial. Standard RI 4.6 is formally introduced.

    Standards Assessed

    B1: RI. 4.2

  • Week 3: April 30

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    9

    3

    4

    5

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: RI 4.2, RI 4.6

    Lesson 3: RL 4.2, RL 4.6, RL 4.3

    Lesson 4: L 4.5

    Lesson 5: SL 4.1, RL 4.2, RL 4.3

    Notes:

    Unit 2:

    Students are introduced to the central text, The Hope Chest, and each lesson is contingent on students having read one or two chapters of the book for homework the previous day. We recommend teachers have students read assigned chapters for homework as mapped out in this unit. The Lexile level for this book is 800 and the F & P Level is S. Additional information on its text complexity can be located here. An audio edition of the book is also available should teachers be interested in providing this option for students. Rest assured that even if students are unable to complete their homework or have difficulty accessing the text independently, the lessons provide the necessary scaffolds to support their learning through this text. Teachers should establish strategic partnerships to summarize the chapter together in class. The writing at the end of this unit is also critical as it aligns closely with the writing performance students are expected to complete on A4. Students will write an essay about the theme of The Hope Chest.

     

    Weekly Overview:

    The heart of Lessons 7–9 is RI.4.6. The two texts used in this assessment were selected for students to read and compare on-demand and independently. Lesson 9 is the end of unit assessment. Lesson 1 & 2 have been omitted. These lessons set the purpose for reading the novel, The Hope Chest, by revisiting previous texts "Order in the Court" and listening and reading a speech delivered by Susan B. Anthony. We recommend omitting these lessons to allow time for students and teachers to work through each chapter in the novel as Lessons 3 through 18 depend on it. You may consider assigning tasks for Lesson 1 and 2 as homework as students complete a close read form connected to the text about Susan B. Anthony and summarize informational text. Students would have already had practice with these two tasks. Students summarize literature, analyze characters and analyze descriptive language in lessons 3-5.

     

    Lesson 9:

    This is the end of unit assessment. Please note that standard RI 4.6 will also be part of this assessment as students will compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of President Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration. Students will complete the Venn diagram portion of the assessment to compare the differences between firsthand and secondhand accounts.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Use this lesson to explicitly model expectations for homework using Chapter 1, including how to use "evidence flags", as this will be a routine that must be established for this unit. This is also a good time to review how to summarize a chapter using the SWBST graphic organizer because the format will be the same for most of the chapters. We recommend using the text dependent questions from Lesson 2 as the exit ticket for this lesson as it addresses RL 4.3 with a focus on Violet. It's also important to note that students practice comparing and contrasting different narrators’ points of view RL.4.6.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Students begin getting into the routine of sharing their summary about the chapter that was assigned as homework. Please note that a summary for most of the chapters has already been provided for teachers in supporting materials. We encourage teachers to prepare these summaries on anchor charts/slides for each chapter in advance as a reference while moving through the novel as well as to support struggling students. This is a good time to establish strategic partnerships to support students that may have difficulty accessing the text or completing the homework. These partnerships should remain the same for the duration of the unit as the beginning of most lessons involve having students share their summary for the chapter read for homework. Independent reading is a good time for students to complete the gist activity with Chapter 3 in this lesson. This will allow teachers to pull a small group that need scaffolded support with the reading and task.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talks

    Students follow the same routine by sharing their summary for the chapter that was assigned for homework. This lesson gives students the opportunity to form triads to discuss and create a summary together. We encourage teachers to be strategic with triads and ensure students are placed in heterogeneous groups that could support students with different needs, including ELs and DLs. Students will be required to reread Chapter 3 and complete a summary statement together. Please note that students will be required to read 2 chapters for homework (Chapters 4 and 5). Teachers may want to consider using triad talks as a time for students to read Chapter 4 instead and complete homework. By using the triads talks for Chapter 4, you make the homework more manageable for students as they only have to read and complete tasks for Chapter 5 as homework. If teachers are interested in using the text-dependent questions for Chapter 3, you can use them as an exit ticket at the end of the lesson.

    Standards Assessed

    R.I.4.2

    R.I.4.6

  • Week 4: May 7

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    6

    7

    8

    9

    Assessment

    Biweekly 2

    Lesson 8, Exit Ticket from the Assessment and Closing section of the lesson: “Why was Myrtle forced to leave the suffragists’ train car and go to the ‘colored car’? Use your new background knowledge from the text ‘Jim Crow Laws’ to support your answer.”

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Students work on clustering vocabulary to build meaning from the text, continue to work on summarizing text and then shift their focus to learn about the writing process for essay writing by examining the structure of short essays, and gathering evidence for an essay.

     

    Lesson 6:

    In this lesson, students will cluster vocabulary words to build meaning from the text. Students will use a strategy that requires a certain level of abstraction that may not come easily to all students. Although this lesson is heavily scaffolded (words are pre-identified), and probing questions support students in categorizing words, teachers should read over the word category exercises ahead of time. This will help teachers identify where students will struggle and make additional adjustments based on student needs. The next lesson will ask students to use their Reader's Guide notes for Chapters 1-6 to identify the most important details from each of the chapters read thus far. At the end of this lesson, we recommend doing an organizational check to ensure students have the necessary materials to support the work for the next day.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talks, Mix & Mingle, Gallery Walk (Recommended)

    This lesson asks students to summarize Chapters 1–6. They will work with their triads to summarize the first six chapters of the novel in a longer summary statement. We recommend having teachers explicitly model using I/We/You format for Chapter 1 and then organize 5 triads or small groups and assign one chapter (2-6) to summarize together. This will support students who struggle with accessing the text and have had difficulty completing the assignments. Use the Mix and Mingle for students to share their summaries or consider using a gallery walk for each group work for the chapter assigned.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talks

    Students begin to learn about the process for writing an essay. This lesson presents a great opportunity to revisit RI 4.2 as students work with an informational text about Jim Crow Laws. Students will also begin writing daily as they respond to prompts that require short responses. Consider how you will use current organizational systems, including strategic pairing to support the writing that will occur often. Sentence frames, stems, and completed short responses to a prompt with fill-in-blanks can support ELs and DLs. We also recommend using a writer's notebook for teachers to explicitly model how to respond to a prompt as well as to build students' writing stamina around topics addressed. At the end of this unit, students will be completing an on-demand writing essay from a prompt about the theme of The Hope Chest. The Exit Ticket will serve as Bi-weekly 2 and it will assess RL.4.3.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face

    In this lesson, students examine the structure of short essays and continue to prepare for their essay by gathering evidence about Myrtle from the text. They also learn about the basic structure of a short essay. For the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, be strategic about pairing ELs and DLs to ensure all students are participating in the activity.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 6: RL 4.1, L 4.4

    Lesson 7: RL 4.1, RL 4.2

    Lesson 8: RI 4.2, RL 4.3, W 4.9

    Lesson 9: RL 4.3, W 4.2, W 4.9

    Standards Assessed

    B2: RL.4.3

  • Week 5: May 14

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    13

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students plan and write an essay, complete the mid-unit assessment and continue to work on summarizing skills they have been practicing in earlier lessons. They then shift from summarizing the plot and analyzing characters for comprehension, to determining the novel’s larger theme and analyzing characters’ actions to find evidence of this theme.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face

    Students will officially start planning and writing their essay. The expectation is that students will complete this assignment in one sitting. However, consider using part of Lesson 11 to give students additional time to complete their writing, if necessary. The goal is to have students build their confidence and stamina for writing. This will be important for A4 as students will respond to a prompt and write an essay about theme.

     

    Lesson 11:

    This lesson is the mid-unit assessment for Unit 2 and will assess student mastery of RL 4.1 - 4.3, L 4.4 and L 4.5. It is recommend to treat this assessment as a lesson to address misconceptions around these standards. The assessment asks students to read a new chapter from the novel The Hope Chest, summarize events in the chapter, and answer a series of questions. There is also an extended writing task and this can be omitted and used to give students more time to finish their writing from the previous lesson.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back Face-to-Face

    Similar to Lesson 7 in this unit, students will be asked to summarize Chapters 7–11. They will be required to review their chapter notes thus far and complete a story map. The purpose of this lesson is to begin shifting the instructional focus towards determining the central theme of The Hope Chest. Students use the elements of The Hope Chest (characters, setting, and events) to analyze the development of this theme throughout the remainder of the novel. We suggest delivering this lesson similarly to Lesson 7 where students work with their triads or small groups and are assigned one chapter to summarize and then share their work with peers to support students with mixed abilities.

     

    Lesson 13:

    Students use the learning from the previous lesson to focus on the central theme in literature. They begin to understand that the central theme in literature is a story’s message about people, life, and the world we live in that the author wants the reader to understand. Students see that the message is communicated through character actions and it is implicit. Teachers should provide students many concrete examples of texts they've read in class or the previous year (fairy tales) to practice the skill of determining theme in a story.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 10: RL 4.2, RL 4.3, W 4.9 SL 4.1

    Lesson 11: RL 4.1, RL 4.2, RL 4.3, L 4.4, L. 4.5, W 4.2, W 4.9

    Lesson 12: RL 4.1, RL 4.2, RL 4.7

    Lesson 13: RL 4.3, RL 4.2

     

    Standards Assessed

    R.L 4.1

    R.L.4.2

    R.L.4.3

    L.4.4

    L 4.5

  • Week 6: May 21

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    14

    15

    16

    17

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students continue to analyze a text for central theme, then begin preparing to write an essay on theme by analyzing a sample essay, and reading and gathering evidence from a sample essay. They finish the week by taking part the end of the unit assessment.

     

    Lesson 14:

    Students continue to learn what theme is and how to identify it in literary text. Students use the actions the class has recorded on the character anchor charts to determine a central theme for the text. As students continue to collect evidence of theme from The Hope Chest, teachers should begin introducing elements of a strong essay. Students will have the chance to demonstrate their learning with W.2 next week. This will help teachers determine where students are with writing and address gaps prior to A4.

     

    Lesson 15:

    Instructional Protocol: Mix & Mingle

    In this lesson, students are given a prompt about how Myrtle contributes to the central theme. It is very important that you provide supports for ELs and DLs to ensure that they participate in a meaningful way. It is highly encouraged that you implement sentence frames for responding to the prompt and allow students to write a response in their native language, if necessary. This prompt will be used again next week so teachers should keep student work secure so they have it for the following week. Students analyze the criteria for their short essays on theme and then analyze a model essay against the criteria. It is suggested to show students the rubric that is presented in Lesson 18 during today's lesson. This way, students will have a clear understanding of the writing expectations for their essay which will be developed over the subsequent lessons.

     

    Lesson 16:

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talks

    Students prepare for the writing task they will complete after biweekly 3 is taken. Use this lesson to continue gathering evidence related to the central theme from Chapter 17. This will support students with completing the writing task at the end of this unit. Allow for more discussion about how Violet’s actions throughout the novel contribute to the theme or central message. It is important to note that students will be assigned to read chapter 18 for homework and this is necessary for biweekly 3 as students will reread portions of this chapter to answer multiple choice questions. Teachers should consider pulling small groups of students that struggle with accessing the text to pre-read Chapter 18 or providing time during triads in this lesson to prepare for biweekly 3.

     

    Lesson 17:

    Students will take Part I of the end of the unit assessment and question 6 will serve as bi-weekly 3 and will assess RL4.2. This assessment will address literary standards and based on what students learned in Unit 2. The multiple choice questions are based on Chapter 18 from The Hope Chest. Students will not need their books during the biweekly as excerpts from the text will be provided. However if students have not read Chapter 18 for homework, we recommend having students read this chapter independently prior to giving them the biweekly.

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Biweekly 3

    Lesson 17, End of Unit Assessment, Part One, Question 6

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 14: RL 4.3, RL 4.2

    Lesson 15: RL 4.2, W 4.2, W 4.9

    Lesson 16: RL 4.3, RL 4.2, W 4.2, W 4.9

    Lesson 17: RL 4.2, RL 4.3, RL 4.4, RL 4.6, RL 4.7

    Standards Assessed

    B3: RL 4.2

  • Week 7: May 28

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    18

    1

    2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students begin by completing the end of the unit assessment in which they analyze how a character’s actions contribute to the theme in literature. Students then begin a series of lessons to prepare them to complete the performance task, by comparing two texts. They will synthesize ideas in the texts and examine reasons that support those ideas as well as analyze how text structures support those ideas.

     

    Lesson 18:

    This lesson is Part II of the end of the unit assessment. Students write an essay analyzing how a character’s actions contribute to the theme of The Hope Chest. This part of the assessment should be treated as a formative assessment to gauge where students are with their ability to respond to a prompt around theme and craft a essay using evidence from the text. Flex days have been built into this week to give students time to craft their essay.

     

    Unit 3:

    This unit connects the knowledge gained about the Women’s Suffrage Movement from Units 1 and 2 to voting in the present day, specifically the issue of low voter turnout among young adults. Students will read several articles related to youth vote, and write a public service announcement. This unit also bridges the key theme and ideas from the novel The Hope Chest with the content shaped by the essential question, “How can one person make a difference?”

     

    Lesson 1:

    Instructional Protocol: Think-Pair-Share

    This lesson sets the context of the importance of voting in modern times and the importance of the youth vote. Students will listen to the audio speech of and reread the introduction to Susan B. Anthony’s speech “On Women’s Right to the Suffrage” to analyze how Anthony supports her point that women have the right to vote. Students will read an excerpt from The Hope Chest to analyze the main character’s realization of the importance of giving women the right to vote. Students will then synthesize these two texts to bring together ideas about women’s suffrage.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Students will be introduced to their performance task: a public service announcement about voting. Students will gain insight about what a public service announcement is and its purpose, by listening to and reading a transcript of a model public service announcement about helmet safety. To ensure students are successful with their public service announcement, this lesson will also focus on voting academic vocabulary and using a note-catcher to extract reason why voting is important from the text “Youth Power.”

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 18: RL 4.2, RL 4.3, W 4.2, W 4.9

    Lesson 1: RI 4.8, RI 4.9

    Lesson 2: W 4.1, SL 4.4, RI 4.8

    Standards Assessed

    R.L.4.2

    R.L.4.3

    W.4.9

  • Week 8: June 4

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    3

    4

    5

    6

    Notes:

    Students continue to synthesize ideas as they read from multiple texts as well as take the mid-unit assessment where they will be reading and comparing new informational texts. They will then begin the planning and drafting of their public service announcement which is the performance task.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Instructional Protocols: Jigsaw, Concentric Circles

    In this lesson, students reread “Youth Power” to analyze how authors use different text structures when organizing their reasons and evidence. Students will work with partners and engage in a text structure jigsaw using the text “Youth Power.” Students will read “I Can't Wait to Vote!” for homework. This text will be used in the Lesson 4 to synthesize ideas about why voting is important.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back Face-to-Face

    In this lesson, students will read “I Can't Wait to Vote!” and synthesize it with “Youth Power.” “I Can't Wait to Vote!” may prove to be a very complex text for some students. Consider breaking this lesson up into two days by having students read and analyze the text’s reasons and evidence on one day, then focus on synthesizing both texts the following day.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Even though this lesson is a mid-unit assessment, it is recommended that you treat it as a regular lesson to address misconceptions to support you in preparing for next week's ANet.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Students will use a graphic organizer to plan and organize their public service announcement about the importance of voting. Students will begin to focus on reasons (using facts, quotes and other details from texts read in previous lessons) to craft their opinion statement. They will examine how word choice is important to crafting a strong opinion statement. Students will also examine a partially completed Public Service Announcement rubric and will collaborate as a class to complete the rubric as they learn more about how to write and present their public service announcement.

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 3: RI 4.8, RI 4.5

    Lesson 4: RI 4.8, RI 4.9

    Lesson 5: RI 4.8, RI 4.5, RI 4.9

    Lesson 6: W 4.1, SL 4.4, L 4.1

    Standards Assessed

    R.I.4.5

    R.I.4.8

    R.I.4.9

  • Week 9: June 11

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    7

    8

    9

    Assessment

    ANet

    Performance Task

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 7: W 4.1, SL 4.3, SL 4.4, L 4.2

    Lesson 8: W 4.1, W 4.5, SL 4.4, SL 4.3

    Lesson 9: W 4.1, W 4.8, SL 4.5

    Standards Assessed

    W.4.1

    W.4.1b

    W. 4.8

    SL.4.5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    As they approach the end of the module, students will be drafting and revising the performance task, which is the public service announcement (PSA). They will get feedback from peers and ultimately present the PSA in the final lesson of the module.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

    This lesson focuses on planning the introduction and conclusion and drafting the public service announcement, using the “Wear Your Helmet!” as a model.  Students will explore how to use quotation marks in writing to quote from outside sources. They will also explore the coherence, organization, and style section of the rubric.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

    Students will use a peer critique note-catcher to work with a peer to revise and rehearse their oral presentation of the public service announcement using the peer critique protocol.  Students will review critique norms. The critique will allow for two rounds of feedback. The first round will focus on the criteria in the Command of Evidence section of the rubric. The second round will focus on the first and third criteria from the Speaking and Oral Presentation section of the rubric. Students will also add to the speaking portion of their public service announcement rubric.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique and Chalk Talk

    This lesson focuses on creating a visual (by hand) to support the main point of the students’ public service announcement.  However, if technology is available, encourage students to use software like Microsoft PowerPoint, Kidspiration, or Prezi to create their visual and insert a hyperlink to the audio performance of their public service announcement. Students will use model exemplars and engage in a Chalk Talk to notice how to effectively support the main point of the public service announcement they represent.  Students plan and draft their visuals using a graphic organizer, talking through their ideas with partners prior to writing. They then engage in a silent critique of their visuals.  Students will then set a goal for revision of their visuals based on the their classmates’ critiques.