Q4 5th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2016-17

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

 

Module 4: Gathering Evidence and Speaking to Others: Natural Disasters in the Western Hemisphere

The fourth module of fifth grade engages students in a high-interest topic—natural disasters—with a literacy focus on point of view in literature, research, opinion writing, and public speaking. The module integrates science content (about extreme natural events) with a Social Studies focus on the Western Hemisphere and the role of multinational organizations. In Unit 1, students read about the science behind natural disasters, specifically earthquakes and hurricanes. In Unit 2, students read literature that is set during a natural disaster. They consider what they can learn from literature about natural disasters and their impact on the people who experience them. This is explored through an analysis of the narrator’s perspective and how this impacts the description of events as well as the visual elements of the text.  In Unit 3, students work in research teams to investigate natural disasters that have affected countries in the Western Hemisphere. As a connection to Social Studies, students also will read primary source documents to learn about how the United States and multinational organizations, such as the Red Cross, respond to disasters in the Western Hemisphere. Based on this research, students then will draft and revise an opinion speech in which they take a stand on what role U.S. humanitarian organizations should take when neighboring countries are struck by natural disasters. They will then deliver this speech to the class.

 

Please note that there is an older version of this module still online which includes a novel study of "Dark Water Rising." The newer module version which is paced here does not include this novel, though it could be used as a supplementary text for small groups or independent reading. Please be sure to use the links provided so you don't encounter the outdated version.

 

This module has opportunities for arts integration. If your school has an art teacher, consider discussing possibilities for collaboration or integration. Page 8 of the module lists some ideas.

 

Also consider planning a field trip to the Museum of Science and Industry's Storm exhibit.

 

ANet Resources

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 5 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 350-1160. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: April 17

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: R.I.5.1, 5.9

    Lesson 2: R.I.5.1, 5.3, 5.4

    Lesson 3: R.I.5.1, 5.3, 5.4

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students will begin the module with a gallery walk to pique curiosity about the module as well as to gauge their knowledge about hurricanes and earthquakes. Students will then engage in a close reading of an informational text to explain the relationship between the scientific concepts behind the causes of an earthquake, as well as the effects on the environment and humans that categorize it as a natural disaster. Next students will follow a similar routine as in the previous lesson but will focus on hurricanes instead of earthquakes.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Instructional Protocols: Gallery Walk, World Café

    Be sure to do Part B of the "Closing and Assessment" section so that students have their journals and vocabulary glossaries. If possible, have your school order, or obtain from the library, books from the "Recommended Texts" list so that students can begin independent reading about natural disasters. If you don't have access to recommended texts to have students use for homework, consider using an article on natural disasters for lesson 1 homework, like this one or an article from this Newsela text set. A graphic organizer can be used instead of evidence flags for students to note important information and the page/paragraph number in which they found it.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Consider downloading the "Earthquake Concepts" organizer as a word document and switching the page setup to "landscape" so that you can widen the columns so that students can more feasibly write into the organizer.

     

    Lesson 3:

    This lesson has an almost identical format to lesson 2 except it is about hurricanes

  • Week 2: April 24

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #1

    Lesson 4, Mid Unit Assessment, Question 3

    End of Unit Assessment, Part I

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students begin the week by taking the mid-unit assessment. Lessons 5 and 6 set up the End of Unit Assessment in Lesson 7 by clearly defining the words "natural" and "disaster", practicing the skill of synthesizing information from more than one text, and analyzing a model informative/explanatory essay. Work Time C in Lesson 6 includes preparation for the on demand essay in Lesson 7. Both of Lesson 6 Work Time C and Lesson 7 essay writing are meant to be done without teacher support, so it would be possible for these tasks to be accomplished during small group time as a center/station or independent work. Students are taking a lot of tests at this time of year, so it would be more motivating to frame this as an authentic writing piece (which is what it is), rather than as another test.

     

    Lesson 4:

    This is the Mid-Unit Assessment that assesses R.I.5.1, 5.3, and 5.4. Question 3 will serve as the bi-weekly assessment and will assess RI.5.4. Also note that lesson 4 calls for another article to be read that further builds students' background knowledge on natural disasters.  Consider adding the information to the "Earthquakes" anchor chart and students' journals.

     

    Lessons 5:

    Instructional protocols: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face, Milling to Music

    In this lesson, students will practice the skill of synthesizing information read from more than one text, In advance: Write and post the vocabulary words and definitions for students to refer to during Work Time, Part B and in preparation for homework.

     

    Lesson 6:

    In this lesson, students prepare for the End of Unit 1 Assessment (Lesson 7), a short essay that answers the question “What Makes a Hurricane a Natural Disaster?”. During work time, students see how to plan and then examine a model essay about the other natural disaster they have been studying: earthquakes. When using models, it is important to work with content students are familiar with (earthquakes) but that is different from the topic they themselves will write about (hurricanes). This ensures that students can follow the thinking but will not copy the model essay when they go to write their own

     

    Lesson 7:

    Students take the End of Unit 1 On-Demand Assessment: “What Makes a Hurricane a Natural Disaster?” They write an essay that uses evidence from each of the informational articles they read during this unit on hurricanes in order to describe how a hurricane is a natural disaster.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4: R.I.5.1, 5.3, 5.4

    Lesson 5: R.I.5.1, 5.4, 5.9

    Lesson 6: W.5.2, 5.4, 5.9

    Lesson 7: W.5.2, 5.4, 5.9

    Standards Assessed

    B1: RI.5.4

    R.I.5.1

    R.I.5.3

    R.I.5.4

    W.5.2

    W.5.4

    W.5.9

  • Week 3: May 1

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    8

    1

    2

    3

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment, Part 2

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 8: S.L.5.1

    Lesson 1: R.L.5.1, 5.2, S.L.5.1

    Lesson 2: R.L.5.6, S.L.5.1, W.5.2, 5.9

    Lesson 3: R.L.5.7, L.5.5

    R.L.5.1, 5.6, 5.7

    L.5.5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students begin the week by finishing the end of the unit assessment, which is a science talk. If students experienced Module 2A, they will be familiar with the Science Talk protocol, which they participated in during Unit 1 of that module. Lessons 1, 2, & 3: Teachers, please review all three of these lessons before beginning Lesson 1. Pay particular attention to the progression of text analysis building from more literal to inferential. Students may not unlock the key understandings in Lesson 1 - this is intentional and acceptable. Students will enhance their understanding as they move on to Lessons 2 and 3. Also, note that this progression is evident in the students' graphic organizers.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Instructional Protocol: Science Talk

    End of Unit Assessment, Part 2. Familiarize yourself and the students once more with the protocol (Appendix 1). The purpose is to give the students an experience that allows them to practice and be assessed on the Speaking and Listening standards. The Science Talk and Synthesis assesses Speaking and Listening (SL.5.1). The rubric provided is aligned to that standard's components, so can be used to generate a Speaking and Listening product and grade. Consider the suggested compelling questions in the lesson; feel free to craft a different question if students have become interested in some other compelling angle on this topic. Just be sure that the question is provocative and open ended.

     

    Lesson 1:

    This lesson introduces students to "Eight Days: A Story of Haiti" and assumes that each student will have a copy of the book, if this is not the case, consider making photocopied booklets. The lesson involves three reads of the text, and students may need more time to finish the text dependent questions of the third read so consider having them finish during independent reading or the following day. Lesson 1 also involves students interpreting and charting "WHAT events take place and WHERE? (main events from beginning/middle/end)." This is an opportunity to address standard RL.5.5 and discuss how the series of scenes in the story provide the overall structure (interview after rescue, flashback to things he imagined while trapped, description of happiness after rescue).

     

    Lesson 2:

    This lesson involves students in using a task card in groups to formulate claims about how the narrator's point of view influences the telling of events and then write an essay. You might want to consider chunking the process, having students do 1 step of the task card at a time, then checking in as a whole class before moving on to the next step. Also, steps 3 and 4 may work better if students work independently and then have partner/whole class check-ins. The lesson also includes this think-pair-share question in the Engaging the Reader portion: “What were we able to learn about the impact that the earthquake in Haiti had on humans or the environment from Junior’s description of events in Eight Days?”

     

    Lesson 3:

    This lesson is the third in a series of three that are focused on inferring about the human experience of natural disasters through analysis of the text Eight Days: A Story of Haiti. In this lesson, students continue their analysis of the text by examining figurative language (L.5.5) and images in the text (RL.5.7). Students use this deeper analysis to develop a response to the unit’s guiding question: “What can literature about natural disasters teach us about their impact on the people who experience them?”

    Standard Assessed

    SL.5.1

  • Week 4: May 8

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Lesson 6, Mid-Unit Assessment, Question #8

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Note: Lessons 4 and 5 are similar to lessons 1-3 but with less scaffolding. Students start out the week by reading the text for the gist, followed by a second read to answer text-dependent questions focusing on inferring, the meaning of challenging vocabulary, and figurative language. Then they prepare for deeper analysis of the narrator’s point of view by taking analysis notes. In Lesson 5, students will again write a literary analysis focused on how the narrator’s point of view influences the description of events in the story. Note that Bi-weekly 2 is in lesson 6, question 8, which is the mid-unit assessment.

     

    Lesson 4: Students read the text for gist, followed by a second read to answer text-dependent questions focusing on inferring, the meaning of challenging vocabulary, and figurative language. Then they prepare for deeper analysis of the narrator’s point of view by taking analysis notes. Group students intentionally, ideally in heterogeneous groups of four (as in Lesson 1).

     

    Lesson 5:

    Instructional Protocols: Fist to Five Protocol

    Students' literary essays need to be graded and ready to be passed back by Lesson 5 so that students can receive and reflect on feedback before writing their next literary essay on "Save Bella!" in Lesson 5. students may need more time to prepare for the opening of this lesson if they did not complete their analysis notes in Lesson 4. In Work Time A, students have a chance to share and revise their analysis notes. In Work Time B, students examine the sample literary analysis about Eight Days (from the supporting materials of Lesson 2).

     

    Lesson 6:

    This lesson is Part 1 of the Mid-Unit Assessment and question 8 will serve as the Bi-weekly assessment and will assess RI.5.2. In this first part of the assessment, students read the text and answer text-dependent questions to infer the meaning of the text, analyze images, and determine the meaning of figurative language in a short story about Hurricane Sandy.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Students take Part 2 of the Mid-Unit Assessment. In this part of the assessment, students take analysis notes and write a literary analysis essay about how the narrator’s point of view influences the description of events in the narrative. Some students may need more time than allotted in the opening of this lesson to process feedback on their literary analysis essays about “Save Bella!” from Lesson 5. For these students, consider sharing their feedback with them ahead of time and conferring with them about goals they would like to set for the mid-unit assessment.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4: R.L.5.1, 5.7, L.5.5

    Lesson 5: R.L.5.6, W.5.2, 5.9

    Lesson 7: R.L.5.6, W.5.2, 5.9

    Lesson 8: R.L.5.6, S.L.5.1

    Standards Assessed

    B2: RI.5.2

    RI.5.2

    RL.5.6

    W.5.8

    L.5.5

    RL.5.2

    RL.5.7

  • Week 5: May 15

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    8

    9

    1

    2a, 2b

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students begin the week by focusing on how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described as they read a text about an author's perspective. They take the end of the unit assessment and then shift to reading informational test to build background knowledge in lessons 1 and 2 in unit 3.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Instructional Protocols: Fishbowl, Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face

    In this lesson, students read the author’s note from Eight Days and consider how the author’s background affects her perspective (RL.5.6). They take notes to prepare for this discussion in small groups first. They then join the whole class for a discussion of both the author’s note and the Unit 2 guiding question. If you feel your students need more time to master this standard (RL.5.6), consider spending more time reading and analyzing the author’s note in this lesson.

     

    Lesson 9:

    This is the End of Unit Assessment. In this assessment, students read about the author of “In the Middle of the Storm” (the text from the mid unit assessment). They then answer a few text-dependent questions that focus on how the author’s background affected her perspective (RI.5.1 and RL.5.6). Then, as an optional portion to the assessment, students have the opportunity to create a piece of artwork to accompany their response to the guiding question.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Instructional Protocols: Jigsaw, Task Cards

    Be sure to strategically group students in Lesson 1 and reinforce students following group norms because students will be working in these groups for Lesson 2 and many of the following lessons in this unit.  You may even want to assign groups' classwork grades based on how well they followed the group norms.  During the 1st read of Obama's speech, have each jigsaw group not only decide the gist/main point of their section, but also underline the key details/quotes that support Obama's main point in that section so that they are practicing R.I.5.8.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Instructional Protocols: Gallery Walk, Back/Back Face/Face, Jigsaw

    Split Lesson 2 into two days: day 1-parts A and B; day 2-part C, closing and assessment, and time to distribute/begin homework. As in Lesson 1, students participate in a Jigsaw (see Appendix), where they transition from regular small groups to expert groups to read and explore a certain text, then return to regular small groups to share what they have learned. Students remain in the same expert groups from Lesson 1. Try to strategically assign each text based on students’ needs to offer more support to struggling readers, while stronger readers can work more independently.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: R.L.5.1, 5.6, W.5.11

    Lesson 1: R.I.5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 5.8

    Lesson 2: R.I.5.2, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.9

    Standards Assessed

    RL.5.2

    W.5.9

  • Week 6: May 22

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    2c

    3

    4

    5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Lesson 3, 4 and 5 all follow a similar format in that students are doing research about the Red Cross. Students start the week by continuing to build background knowledge and then shift their focus to research as they learn more broadly what international aid organizations are and how they offer support to areas like Haiti after they are struck by a natural disaster.

     

    Lesson 2 part C:

    In part C of Lesson 2, when students compare their articles in the Venn Diagram, they may focus more intuitively on how the information they read about is similar/different. To ensure that they also practice CCSS R.I.5.5, consider adding some modeling and questions for students to discuss and answer, like: "In what ways do the articles organize the information similarly? How do the articles organize the information differently? Why do you think this is?"

     

    Lesson 3:

    Instructional Protocols: Milling to Music, Fist to Five, Chalk Talk

    The three-column note-catcher from this lesson will serve as bi-weekly 3 and will assess RI5.1. Students closely examine two informational texts to determine the meaning of “multinational,” “aid,” and “organization.” Toward the end of the lesson, students use quotes from their three-column note-catchers to participate in a Chalk Talk activity (see Appendix 1) to share their thinking about what a multinational aid organization is, discuss patterns they notice, and ask clarifying questions. In advance determine how you will display the Taking Notes task card: What Is a Multinational Aid Organization? so only one part is visible to students at a time. Place students into heterogeneous Chalk Talk groups, with a maximum of six students per group. Depending on class size, these groups may be similar to students’ expert groups from Lessons 1 and 2.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Instructional Protocols: Popcorn Read

    Providing feedback to students on their note catchers from Lesson 3 is important because Lesson 4 follows a very similar format. Students add information to their three column note-catchers from Lesson 3 to explain how the Red Cross is a clear example of a multinational aid organization. Students remain in their regular small groups throughout Work Times A, B, and C.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Instructional Protocols: Rank, Talk, Write, and Four Corners

    Similar to Lessons 1 and 2, students participate in a Jigsaw with their expert groups. The activities in this lesson serve as a scaffold for the mid-unit assessment, which students take in Lesson 6. In preparation for this assessment, make sure the What Do We Know about Natural Disasters? anchor chart (from Unit 1) is posted for review. Also, return any note-catchers you may have collected for students to use during the assessment.

    Assessment

    Bi-weekly 3

    Lesson 3, Three column note catcher: A multinational aid organization is…

    a large corporation with branches throughout the world that brings relief efforts to

    people who are struck by natural disaster, or who are in need.

    The Red Cross is a multinational aid organization because …

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 3: R.I.5.1, W.5.8, 5.9, S.L.5.1

    Lesson 4: R.I.5.1, 5.4, W.5.8, 5.9

    Lesson 5: W.5.7, 5.8, 5.9, S.L.5.1

    Lesson 6: R.I.5.7, W.5.1, 5.7, 5.8

    Standard Assessed

    B3: RI.5.1

  • Week 7: May 29

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    6

    7

    8

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Students take Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part I: Short Constructed Response and Organizing Notes for a Public Speech and Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part II: Organizing Notes for a Public Speech in preparation for the final performance task and then move into crafting the introduction to their speeches for the performance task.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Instructional Protocols: Milling to Music, Fist to Five

    In this lesson, students complete Part I of the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment. In this part of the assessment, students complete a short constructed response, then refer to three texts and two note catchers from Lessons 3-5 (“Characteristics of Multinational Companies (MCNs)”; “The Red Cross: Disaster Relief”; “Haiti Earthquake One-Year Report”; 3-Column note catcher: What is a Multinational Aid Organization?; Red Cross in Haiti 4-Square note catcher) to create an outline for their opinion speeches. These speeches are a part of students’ Final Performance Task for this unit.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Save the outlines students created in Lessons 6/7 for the mid-unit assessment, they will be needed for the end of unit assessment. In this lesson, students take Part II of the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Organizing Notes for a Public Speech and add reasons, evidence, and a concluding statement to their outlines from Part I of the assessment. Review and score students’ Mid-Unit 3 Assessments, Parts I and II. They will need their outlines from the assessment for the End of Unit 3 Assessment in Lesson 11.

     

    Lessons 8 & 9:

    Instructional Protocols: Four Corners, Fist to Five

    Lessons 8-10 provide valuable modeling and practice for students in opinion writing before they write their own opinion speech in Lesson 11. Be sure to make and keep the anchor charts up during this process. This is the first of three consecutive lessons in which the teacher guides students through a shared writing process about how aid should be prioritized after an earthquake. The purpose of the shared writing experience is to model parts (introduction, body, conclusion) of the opinion speech students will craft during the End-of-Unit 3 Assessment and deliver during the Final Performance Task.

    Assessment

    Mid Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 7: R.I.5.7, W.5.1, 5.8, 5.9

    Lesson 8: W.5.1, S.L.5.1, 5.3

    Lesson 9: S.L.5.3, W.5.1

    R.I.5.7

    Standards Assessed

    RI.5.7

    W. 5.1

    W.5.7

    W.5.8

  • Week 8: June 5

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Lessons 8-10 provide valuable modeling and practice for students in opinion writing before they write their own opinion speech in Lesson 11. Be sure to make and keep the anchor charts up during this process. This week students work on crafting their speeches. They start the week by Identifying Reasons, Evidence and Linking Words, and then move on to Identifying Criteria for a High Quality Conclusion. In the End of Unit 3 Assessment: Students begin to draft their opinion speech: How Should Aid Be Prioritized Following a Natural Disaster in a Neighboring Country? If possible, use the Drafting an Opinion Speech: Assessment Rubric to grade students’ speeches before Lesson 12. If that is not feasible, consider: A) Photocopying students’ speeches, so you can return their originals in Lesson 12 and keep the photocopied versions to score as time permits; B) Skimming students’ speeches to provide one piece of specific positive feedback—based on one focus area of the rubric—and one specific suggestion they should focus on when revising.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Instructional Protocols: Four Corners, Fist to Five

    In this lesson, students focus on identifying reasons, evidence, and linking words or phrases that support the opinion expressed in the introduction of a speech. students put their learning into action by working in their regular small groups to craft a body paragraph for the class’s shared writing piece. Keep the body paragraph students choose as the strongest, as this will be referenced in Lessons 10–15. After Lesson 9, keep the body paragraph students identify as strongest; they will use this in Lessons 10-15.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Instructional Protocols: Milling to Music, Fist to Five

    This lesson follows a similar pattern to Lessons 8 and 9. In this lesson, students listen to the introduction, body, and conclusion of Adora Svitak’s TED Talk, “What Adults Can Learn from Kids” three times. Following this, students work with portions of Transcript: Closing Remarks by President Obama to reinforce their understanding of how compelling conclusions call listeners to action. Students move on from these two activities to work with their regular small groups in crafting the conclusion of the class’s shared writing piece. After this, they vote on the strongest conclusion to be added to their class example.

     

    Lesson 11:

    End of unit assessment. Students will use the outlines they created and you saved from the mid-unit assessment (Lessons 6-7) to write a high quality opinion speech in Lesson 11.  If possible, use the "Drafting an Opinion Speech: Assessment Rubric" to grade students' speeches before Lesson 12.  Students should be able to easily see the following anchor charts while taking the end of unit assessment: Linking Words, Criteria for an Opinion Speech, Class Introduction to an Opinion Speech, Class Body of an Opinion Speech, and Class Conclusion to an Opinion Speech.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Instructional Protocols: Peer Critique, Fist to Five

    In this lesson, students refer to the Criteria for an Opinion Speech anchor chart and the Peer Critique protocol to give and receive feedback on the content of their draft opinion speeches. Within the Peer Critical protocol structure, students use the Opinion Speech Criteria feedback form to provide feedback on opinion speeches for two members of their regular small groups.

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 10: S.L.5.1, 5.3, W.5.1

    Lesson 11: L.5.2, W.5.1, 5.4

    Lesson 12: W.5.4, 5.5, S.L.5.1

    Lesson 13: W.5.4, 5.8, L.5.1

    Standards Assessed

    W.5.1

    W.5.4

    L.5.2

  • Week 9: June 12

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    13 / 14

    15

    16

    Assessment

    ANet

    Performance Task

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 14: L.5.3, S.L.5.4, 5.5

    Lesson 15: S.L.5.4, 5.5, 5.6

    Lesson 16: S.L.5.4, 5.5, 5.6

    Standards Assessed

    SL.5.4

    SL.5.5

    SL.5.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview:

    Note: Lessons 13 and 14 have been combined due to time constraints. and the similarity of content. They both focus on editing of the speeches that students are creating for the performance task.  Additionally, these lessons, as well as lesson 15, may take more than a day each for students to complete the tasks. Consider extending their work time into other periods of the day (if possible). During Lessons 12–15, students will revise and practice their speeches before delivering the final and best version in small groups for the final performance task in Lesson 16.

     

    Lesson 13/14:

    In Lessons 13 and 14, the focus is on editing for accurate use of language conventions. Editing is done at the sentence level to address issues related to spelling, grammar, punctuation, and word choice. The focus is on the product rather than the process. Note the difference between revising and editing. Lesson 12 emphasized revision, when students participated in peer critique and feedback sessions to revise their draft opinion speeches. In revision, the writing process and the written work are emphasized, considering strengths and weaknesses in argument, organization, supporting reasons, and evidence. Additionally, students will create visual displays to accompany their speech presentations.

     

    Lesson 15:

    Instructional Protocols: Go Around and Glass, Bugs, Mud

    In the first half of this lesson, students consider what makes a strong multimedia display. First, they reexamine their multimedia display plan against the Multimedia Display Criteria. They share their findings in their regular small groups and provide and receive feedback, which they use to further refine their plans. Next, they complete their multimedia displays using computers (if accessible) and other additional materials.  Students will need access to computers in order to create their multimedia presentations. The lesson recommends that each student receive a 22x28'' poster board to place printed out images and text on.  If it would be more feasible, consider modifying the multimedia presentation format to a digital format like PowerPoint/Google slides.

     

    Lesson 16:

    Instructional Protocols: Gallery Walk and Peer Critique

    Lesson 16 allows students to present their speeches and receive feedback.  Consider inviting parents, administration, and other stakeholders to this event to diversify and enrich the audience and provide students with an authentic audience to showcase their learning.