Q1 6th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 16-17

Q3

SY 16-17

Q4

SY 16-17

Overview

Module 1: Becoming a Close Reader and Writing to Learn

Title: Myths Not Just Long Ago

In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories. This task centers on NYSP12 ELA Standards RL.6.3, W.6.3, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.6, W.611c, L.6.2, and L.6.3.

ANet Resources

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

Grade 6 - ELA Implementation Guide

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 6 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 1-8 and Lexiles 140-925. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: September 4

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RL.6.1, SL.6.1

    Lesson 2: RL.6.1, L.6.4, SL.6.1

    Notes:

    Unit Alignment to Performance Task

    In Unit 1, as students are introduced to the central text, The Lightning Thief, and begin to study the elements and purpose of myth as well as a deep understanding of the hero’s journey, they will be preparing for the final performance task, which requires them to create their own hero’s journey story that includes elements of myth.

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Lesson 1-2

    These first two lessons are designed to engage students in the world of mythology before they begin the novel, The Lighting Thief. It also introduces students to close reading practices and the gist.

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 1

    Engaging the Reader: Close Reading Part 1 of “Shrouded in Myth”

    Instructional Protocol: Think Pair Share, Fist to Five

    This lesson introduces close reading practices including the gist. Remember that gist is simply an initial thinking of what the text is mostly about. Distinguish between gist, main idea, and central idea (Gist refers to the main point of a chunk of a text.).

    Routines and Procedures:

    Consider setting expectations for Cold Call, TPS and Fist to Five including having anchor charts. During these read-alouds, set expectations for students to look at the text and actively read in their minds. The Close Reading anchor chart will be used in future lessons and you will continue to add on to it.

    Building Background:

    After the mystery quote and picture, introduce your students to a special basket for the module where students can read more myths to build knowledge around the genre's elements and purposes.

    Lesson 2

    Building Background Knowledge: Close Reading Part 2 of “Shrouded in Myth”

    Instructional Protocol: Think Pair Share

    Students are introduced to the ideas of a “close reading” and will start to build a class anchor chart. In future lessons, students add to their practices of close reading. Students will read chapters of the novel for homework, set up incentives to encourage and hold students accountable. If students do not have an individual copy of the novel, make copies of weekly chapters.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Consider setting expectations for triads including anchor charts. This lesson introduces the structure for discussions and builds on existing norms and routines for collaborative work in your classroom. In advance, create triads: groups of three students that will work together; use intentional grouping (heterogeneous).

  • Week 2: September 11

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    3 / 4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #1

     Lession 7, Mid Unit Assessment

    Question 3, Part B

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 3: RL.6.1, RL.6.6, SL.6.1

    Lesson 4: RL.6.I, L.6.4, RL.6.3, RL.6.6

    Lesson 5: RL.6.1, RL.6.3, RL.6.6

    Lesson 6: RL.6.1, RL.6.3, RL.6.6, L.6.4

    Lesson 7: RI.6.1, RL.6.3

    Standards Assessed

    B1: RI.6.3

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    These lessons will require students to complete tasks with greater independence. Teachers please make sure when possible to make connections to students' home language around Latin and Greek roots: anti-, dis-, in-, im-, inter-, pre-, sub-, trans.

    Consolidate Lessons 3 & 4

    Lesson 3

    Meeting the Main Character: Launching The Lightning Thief (Chapter 1)

    Lesson 4

    Inferring about Character: Getting to Know Percy (Chapters 1 and 2)

    Instructional Protocol: Carousel Brainstorm, Close Reading

    Both lessons cover chapter 1, so students can complete both inferencing activities in one lesson. For Lesson 3, complete the Carousel quotes. Omit the whole group discussion or minimize time spent on it. Give the text dependent questions for homework and omit the assessment activity. In Lesson 4, omit the entrance ticket and summarize making inferences for chapter one or omit this so you have enough time to complete the rest of the activities.

    Routines and Procedures:

    In advance: Create the charts for the “Carousel of Quotes” and prepare the quotes -ten charts total.

    Building Background:

    Review inferencing strategies and character traits that will help students identify the character; overall, the academic vocabulary used to determine and describe specific character actions and traits. Try to do this before teaching the lesson in small groups, or start reviewing concepts during do now’s, morning meetings, etc.

    Lesson 5

    Inferring about Character: Close Reading of The Lightning Thief (Chapter 3)

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    This lesson will require students to complete tasks with greater independence. Students work with Chapter 3 in the next two lessons. In this lesson, students focus on the skills of getting the gist and making inferences.

    Routines and Procedures:

    This lesson introduces a new routine: a comprehension quiz Entrance ticket.

    Building Background:

    Students continue making inferences about the character and review key vocabulary to describe action and inner thoughts of character.

    Lesson 6

    Connecting Literary and Informational Texts: Cronus and “The Myth of Mythology”

    Instructional Protocol: Back to Back

    In the following lesson, students will focus on vocabulary strategies and answer questions with evidence. This lesson gives you rich formative assessment data about the types of questions and skills with which students are comfortable or struggling.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol (Appendix 1). In advance: Prepare Chapter 3 Questions from the Text in “Question Baskets.” This lesson introduces the use of “equity sticks”. Prepare equity sticks in advance: popsicle sticks (one stick for each student, with the student’s name).

    Lesson 7

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Making Inferences about Percy

    Instructional Protocol: Silent Mingle

    This is a mid-unit assessment. Administer the entire assessment to students. Question 3, Part B will serve as the biweekly assessment and will assess RL.6.3, which was explicitly taught over the past several lessons. It's important to note that this item was selected to ensure students understand and are able to identify text evidence.

  • Week 3: September 18

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10 / 11

    12

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 8: RI.6.1, RI.6.2, RI.6.4

    Lesson 9: RI.6.1, RI.6.2, RI.6.4, SL.6.1

    Lesson 10: RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RI.6.1, W.6.4

    Lesson 11: RL.6.1, RI.6.1, W.6.9

    Lesson 12: RL.6.1, RI.6.1, W.6.2, W.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    This purpose of lessons 8 & 9 is to build students’ background knowledge about the important archetype of the hero’s journey. Lessons 10-11 focus on writing with evidence.

    Lesson 8

    Exploring Allusions to Myths in The Lightning Thief: Close Reading Part 1 of “Prometheus”

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    The ultimate objective is for students to apply their new understandings of hero to Percy’s experiences in The Lightning Thief.

    Lesson 9

    Analyzing Details in the Myth of Prometheus for Elements of Mythology and Theme

    Instructional Protocol: Close Reading

    Reinforce the concept of the hero’s journey archetype that will help students understand more about Percy Jackson’s experiences. The text is challenging, both because of its vocabulary and because of the many abstract concepts.

    Building Background

    Withhold explaining too much, as students will understand more as they continue to reread, write, talk, and focus on key vocabulary.

    Consolidate Lessons 10 & 11

    Lesson 10

    Selecting Evidence and Partner Writing: Aligning “The Hero’s Journey” and The Lightning Thief (Chapter 5) Lesson 11

    Selecting Evidence: “The Hero’s Journey” and The Lightning Thief (Chapter 6)

    Instructional Protocol: Carousel Brainstorm

    Students read chapters 5 and 6; however, this is an initial low-stakes writing task. Unit 2 devotes much more time to heavily scaffolding students’ writing. You can consolidate both lessons in one. In lessons 10, give students as homework or center time part A of the work time and minimize the closing and assessment time. In lesson 11, minimize time spent on the opening section B. This lesson continues the series of lessons scaffolding students toward writing with evidence. You can minimize this section as well or omit since they will be experiencing more writing with text evidence in unit 2.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Prepare the four quotes on the Carousel of Quotes handout on chart paper around the room (one chart per quote). In lesson 10 Work Time C, students write independently but have a assign them a thought partner. Hold on to the close reading chart. In Unit 2, students will refer back to the chart they helped to build.

    Lesson 12

    Writing with Evidence: Percy and the Hero’s Journey (Chapter 7) End of Unit 1

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

    Routines and Procedures:

    Discuss and model the guidelines for the peer critique protocol.

  • Week 4: September 25

    Module

    1

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    13

    1

    2

    3

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Lesson 13, End of Unit Assessment

    Part 2

     

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 13: RL.6.1, RI.6.1, W.6.9

    Unit 2

    Lesson 1: RI.6.1, RI.6.2

    Lesson 2: RL.6.1, RL.6.2

    Lesson 3: RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RI.6.1, RI.6.2

    Standards Assessed

    B2: W.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students will participate in the End of Unit 1 Assessment in lesson 13. In lessons one through three of Unit 2, students use details to make inferences about the theme, characters and author’s craft. They are also introduced to the Odell Education resource.

    Lesson 13

    End of Unit Assessment: Drawing Evidence from Text: Written Analysis of How Percy’s Experiences Align with “The Hero’s Journey”

    Instructional Protocol: Back to Back

    Administer the entire assessment to students and use Part 2 as the biweekly student artifact because this item will measure student mastery of standard RL6.1, RI6.1 & W6.9 which was explicitly taught over the past several lessons.

    UNIT 2

    Unit Alignment to Performance Task

    In Unit 2, students will delve deeply into mythology: its purpose, elements, and themes that align with themes in The Lightning Thief. As they continue to prepare for the final performance task, which requires them to create their own hero’s journey story that includes elements of myth.

    Lesson 1

    Reading Closely to Build Background Knowledge: “Myths and Legends”

    Students apply and refine their ability to synthesize text based details to make inferences about themes, characters, and author’s craft as they explore the Greek myths that are alluded to throughout the novel.

    Routines and Procedures:

    This lesson introduces a word-catcher, which students use to record key vocabulary throughout the unit. Students may need multiple copies of this word-catcher. Students will work with multiple materials throughout this unit. Consider options for materials management: notebook, folder, binder, etc.

    Lesson 2

    Building Background Knowledge: The Myth of Cronus

    Instructional Protocol: Equity Sticks

    In Unit 2, students are introduced to the Odell Education resource called Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout. Students will refer to this document regularly as a way of understanding and connecting their learning targets. Preview this document in advance, thinking in particular about how it relates to the Things Close Readers Do anchor chart that students created in Unit 1.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review this lesson in advance in order to help students connect to prior learning, including the routine of “notice” and “wonder.” In advance: Create an anchor chart with the title “Things I Notice” and another with “Things I Wonder About.”

    Lesson 3

    Using Details to Determine Theme: The Myth of Cronus

    Instructional Protocol: Chalk Talk

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review the Chalk Talk protocol and think about what procedures are needed for the “Envelope, Please!” activity. In advance, cut up Distinguishing between Topics and Thematic Statements document into strips.

    Building Background:

    Students might need more support around determining the theme.  Reinforce with students that reading for details and connecting (synthesizing) the details will help them begin to infer theme.

  • Week 5: October 2

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4: RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RI.6.1, RI.6.2

    Lesson 5: RI.6.1, L.6.4

    Lesson 6: RL.6.1, RI.6.1, W.6.9

    Lesson 7: RI.6.5, W.6.2, W.6.5, W.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    In the following lessons, students compare literary and informational texts. In addition, they will learn words models to help them build vocabulary and introduces students to a mini-essay model.

    Lesson 4

    What Makes a Myth a Myth? Comparing Cronus and “Shrouded in Myth”

    Instructional Protocol: Carousel

    Continue to emphasize the importance of both rereading and reading a lot of texts on one topic. These two practices help students build knowledge. They may notice how much they have learned since they first read “Shrouded in Myth” on the first day of the module!

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review this lesson in advance to recall the carrousel routine. In advance: Read Chapter 13 of the Lightning Thief to identify pivotal moments you anticipate students will mention. Prepare the charts for the Carousel protocol. Copy the quotes from “Cronus” and “Shrouded in Myth” Carousel of Quotes onto chart paper.

    Lesson 5

    Building Vocabulary: Working with Words about the Key Elements of Mythology

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    Students will learn to use a word model for key concepts.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Determine which word each triad will work with during Work Time Part A. Locate a few nonfiction books in your classroom that have a glossary, to show students as examples during Work Time Part A.

    Building Background:

    Emphasis the difference between clarifying questions and probing questions, give real-life examples.

    Lesson 6

    Connecting Literary and Informational Texts: Cronus and “The Myth of Mythology”

    Instructional Protocol: Chalk Talk, Back to Back, Front to Front

    This lesson has two purposes: first, to support students in making connections between informational and literary texts; second, to scaffold students’ thinking in using elements of mythology to determine the theme of a text.

    Routines and Procedures In advance

    Create charts with paired quotes. Create the Notes: Connecting Elements of Mythology to Theme anchor chart, identical to the graphic organizer students will be using. This anchor chart and graphic organizer are adapted in collaboration with Odell Education based on their Evidence-Based Claims worksheet.

    Lesson 7

    Analyzing the Model Analytical Mini-Essay: “Elements of Mythology and Theme of Cronus”

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    This lesson introduces students to a model mini-essay with two body paragraphs: one in which the author describes elements of mythology in the myth of Cronus, and a second in which the author describes a significant theme in that same myth. It is called a mini-essay because it has a very short introduction and conclusion (just one sentence each). This model essay provides an example of what students will be expected to write for their mid unit assessment.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review Analytical Mini-Essay: “Elements of Mythology and Theme of Cronus”; the Elements of Myth graphic organizer and Theme graphic organizer, and the completed samples of the two graphic organizers.

  • Week 6: October 10

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10

    11

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Bi-Weekly #3

    Lesson 11, Mid-Unit Assessment

    Paragraph 2

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 8: RL.6.1, RL.6.4, L.6.4

    Lesson 9: RL.6.2, RI.6.1, W.6.2

    Lesson 10: RI.6.1, RL.6.1, W.6.2, W.6.5, W.6.9

    Lesson 11: RL.6.1, RI.6.1, RL.6.2, W.6.2, W.6.4, W.6.5

    Standards Assessed

    B3: RL.6.2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Throughout these lessons, students will continue close reading and dig deeper into the text. They will also write an analytical min-essay.

    Lesson 8: Exploring Allusions to Myths in The Lightning Thief: Close Reading Part 1 of “Prometheus”

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    In this lesson, students are introduced to the myth of Prometheus through an allusion to it in The Lightning Thief. They analyze key vocabulary in this excerpt to determine how it contributes to the meaning, and they explain how the allusion to Prometheus helps them to better understand The Lightning Thief.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review the questions on the Reading Closely: Questioning Texts document at the end of this lesson, Focus on the Topic, Information, and Ideas questions, as those are the most relevant to getting the gist. Review the Prometheus Allusion Vocabulary Questions before reviewing the Prometheus allusion in The Lightning Thief. Review the myth of Prometheus on page 72 of “Prometheus”.

    Lesson 9: Analyzing Details in the Myth of Prometheus for Elements of Mythology and Theme

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    A focus of this lesson is the transition from of the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout to the Analyzing Details row as they dig deeper into the text.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Review Elements of Myth graphic organizer and possible answers to get a sense of the type of responses to expect from students.

    Lesson 10: Drafting an Analytical Mini- Essay: Using Partner Talk and Graphic Organizers to Guide Thinking

    Instructional Protocol:

    In Lesson 10, students will be writing an analytical mini-essay about the myth of Prometheus as practice for the mid-unit assessment.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Be sure students have their graphic organizers they completed in Lesson 9. Note that Work Time Part B includes time for students to draft both body paragraphs: the first about elements of mythology, and the second about theme.

    Lesson 11: Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Writing an Analytical Mini-Essay about Mythological Elements and Theme

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

    Administer the entire assessment to students. Paragraph 2 serves as the biweekly assessment and assesses standards RL.6.1, RI.6.1 and RL.6.2 which was explicitly taught over the past several lessons. It's important to note that this item was selected as a biweekly artifact to ensure students understand and are able to identify text evidence.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Consider intentional partnerships for the peer critiques.

  • Week 7: October 16

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    12 / 13

    14

    15 / 16

    17

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 12: RL.6.2, RI.6.4, W.6.2

    Lesson 13: RL.6.1, W.6.2

    Lesson 14: W.6.2, L.6.3

    Lesson 15: RL.6.2, RI.6.2, W.6.9

    Lesson 16: RL.6.1, RI.6.8, W.6.9

    Lesson 17: W.6.2, W.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    In the next few lessons students will work in ‘expert groups.’ They will use teacher feedback to set analytical writing goals. Lessons 15 & 16 start a sequence of lessons leading up to students’ end of unit assessment.

    Consolidate Lessons 12 & 13

    Lesson 12: Determining Theme: Reading Myths in “Expert Groups”

    Lesson 13: Connecting the Theme of the Expert Group Myth to a Theme in The Lightning Thief and to Life Lessons

    Instructional Protocol: Chalk Talk

    This lesson marks the start of the second half of Unit 2, which focuses more deeply on connecting themes of myths to themes in The Lightning Thief. Students will be working in groups in both lessons and are not yet writing themselves, this can be done in one lesson. Lesson 13 helps them understand the criteria of the NYS Writing Rubric. In lesson 12 minimize the closing time and assessment part A. Briefly introduce the rubric, but do not spend too much time  explaining it is best to address parts of the rubric as you are teaching them. In lesson 13, have students turn in the opening for homework and minimize the closing and assessment time.

    Routines and Procedures

    Remember to have students’ mid-unit assessments ready to return to them by Lesson 14. If you are running short on time have students work only on one myth. Review Row 1 and Row 2 of the NYS Writing Rubric, with a focus on the academic vocabulary students need to discuss to be able to use the rubric effectively. Create four charts, one for each of the “Key Elements of Mythology” that lead to a theme.

    Lesson 14: Building Writing Skills: Receiving Feedback and Varying Sentence Structures

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    In this lesson, students use teacher feedback from their mid-unit assessment, as well as the NYS rubric, to identify their individual writing strengths and set goals for their own analytical writing.

    Routines and Procedures

    Be sure to have students’ mid-unit assessments ready to return with specific feedback based on Rows 1 and 2 of the NYS Writing Rubric. Review the NYS Writing Rubric, particularly Rows 1-3.

    Consolidate Lessons 15 & 16

    Lesson 15 Planning for Writing: Revisiting “Key Elements of Mythology” and Determining a Theme in the Myth of Cronus

    Lesson 16 Planning for Writing: Studying Model Writing and Determining a Theme in The Lightning Thief

    Instructional Protocol: Carrousel

    In lesson 15 students will be rereading previous text, and use the same type of graphic organizer used in lesson 7. It is also, primarily a reading lesson; because of their familiarity with the text and tools lessons can be consolidated in one lesson. You can minimize the opening part or assign it as homework.  Then in lesson 16, assign the opening as homework or for center work.  Students analyze a model literary analysis to understand its structure and work together to create a new anchor chart: Structure of a Literary Analysis. Minimize the time on the closing, take a couple of share out instead of the concentric circle protocol.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Make sure students have their Theme graphic organizer: The Myth of Cronus, from Lesson 15.

    Lesson 17: Planning for Writing: Studying Model Writing and Determining a Theme in The Lightning Thief

    Instructional Protocol:

    In this lesson, students plan the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their literary analysis essay using graphic organizers.

  • Week 8: October 23

    Module

    1

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    18 / 19

    20

    1

    2

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 18: RL.6.1, W.6.2

    Lesson 19: RL.6.1, W.6.2, L.6.1

    Lesson 20: RL.6.1, W.6.2, L.6.1

    Unit 3

    Lesson 1: RL.6.3, W.6.3, SL.6.1

    Lesson 2: W.6.2, W.6.3, W.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    The last lessons focus on students drafting and revising their literary analysis. In the first two lessons of the unit, students plan their hero’s journey narrative and analyze a model narrative.

    Consolidate Lessons 18 & 19

    Lesson 18: Launching the End of Unit Assessment: Drafting Literary Analysis

    Lesson 19: Peer Critique and Pronoun Mini- Lesson: Revising Draft Literary Analysis

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique

    Students can write their draft and receive peer feedback in one lesson. In lesson 18 students begin to draft their literary analysis, which is their end of unit assessment; however this draft is not formally assessed. Use a different form for sharing during the opening to minimize time. Students will be at different stages with writing their draft and this will allow students to start with their peer critiques. In lesson 19 skip the part A of the opening. Introduce the peer critique guidelines in between writing their drafts so students know what to do once they are finished. Not all students will need the pronoun mini-lesson so teach it in a small group setting to students that need it.

    Routines and Procedures

    Make sure to have assigned partners that at the same/almost the same level for this activity.  Prepare a chart with the Peer Critique Guidelines; also prepare the Pronouns anchor chart.

    Lesson 20: End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Final Draft of Literary Analysis

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    In this lesson, students write their final, best version of their draft and self-assess their final version against the NYS Writing Rubric.

    Unit 3

    Unit Alignment to Performance Task

    Unit 3 is the culmination of the study of the hero’s journey. Students write their own “hero’s journey” narrative that follows the stages of the archetypal hero’s journey and contains elements and a theme of classic mythology.

    Lesson 1: “The Hero’s Journey”: Using a Graphic Organizer to Deconstruct Percy Jackson’s Hero’s Journey and Plan a New Hero’s Journey Narrative

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    Students are then introduced to writing their own hero’s journey narrative, using the same graphic organizer to help plan it.

    Routines and Procedures:

    If you have not yet launched independent reading; at the beginning of this lesson, independent reading is launched.

    Lesson 2: “The Hero’s Journey”: Analyzing a Model Narrative and Continuing to Plan a New

    Hero’s Journey Narrative

    Instructional Protocol: NA

    In this lesson, students analyze a model narrative and deconstruct it using the same Narrative Story Line to map out Percy Jackson’s hero’s journey. They use the “Key Elements of Mythology” informational text to determine the elements of mythology and a theme that is present in the model narrative.

    Routines and Procedures:

    Due to time constraints, students do not spend time during a lesson studying the rubric for narrative writing. Instead, students get to know the criteria of this project through a close study of the model narrative.

  • Week 9: October 30

    Module

    1

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    3

    4

    5

    6 / 7

    Assessment

    End of Unit Assessment

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 3: W.6.2, W.6.3, W.6.9

    Lesson 4: W.6.3

    Lesson 5: W.6.3

    Lesson 6: RL.6.5, W.6.3

    Lesson 7: W.6.3, W.6.4

    Notes:

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Lesson 3-7

    As the mid-unit assessment students write an explanatory paragraph. Then students will process the feedback and set goals for their narrative; allowing them to continue with the writing process until they publish their narrative.

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 3: Mid-Unit Assessment and Establishing a Context for My Hero’s Journey Narrative

    In this lesson, students use the informational text “The Hero’s Journey” to justify their plan for their own narrative as fitting the archetypal pattern of a hero’s journey. Students write an explanatory paragraph in which they provide two examples from their plan that align with the stages of the hero’s journey, and then provide corresponding evidence from the informational article.

    Routines and Procedures:

    In Advance: For the mid-unit assessment, students will need the Hero’s Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer (from Lesson 2), as well as their informational text “The Hero’s Journey” (from Unit 1).

    Lesson 4: Writing: Getting Feedback, Setting Goals, and Drafting

    In this lesson, students process feedback from the End of Unit 2 and make goals as writers based on feedback.

    Routines and Procedures:

    If computers are available, students could begin to draft the essays in order to make revisions easier in Lessons 5–7. Consider the setup of your classroom if you are using laptops and set computer/laptop expectations. Consider logistics for how students will save and submit their drafts at the end of class: printing, saving to a server, emailing, etc. If using computers is not possible in your classroom, have students draft on lined paper, skipping lines to make room for revisions. Consider giving students more time to handwrite.

    Lesson 5: Writing to Show, Not Tell: Dialogue, Sensory Words, and Strong Action Verbs

    In this lesson, they focus on narrative writing techniques that will help them “show, don’t tell” in their stories. The focus is on using dialogue, sensory language, and strong action verbs.

    Consolidate Lessons 6 & 7

    Lesson 6 Writing: Analyzing the Conclusion of “The Golden Key” and Drafting a Compelling Conclusion for the Hero’s Journey Narrative

    Lesson 7

    End of Unit Assessment—Final Draft of Hero’s Journey Narrative

    Students can draft their conclusion and begin publishing their narrative in one lesson. In this lesson, students determine the differences between the conclusion of a piece of analytical writing and the conclusion of a narrative in order to recognize that conclusions differ in their contents according to their writing modes.  Students provide feedback to peers on the conclusions they have written. Students will be at different stages with writing their conclusions which will allow you to combine both lessons. In lesson 7, not all students will need the transitions mini-lesson so teach it in a small group setting to students that need it.

    Routines and Procedures:

    For lesson 6 the Peer Critique Guidelines and/or prepare a copy of the guidelines for students to keep in their folders.