Q3 6th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 3A

Topic: Understanding Perspectives

Title: The Land of the Golden Mountain

 

ANet Resources

 

ANet Alignment:

The text types on A3 and Module 3A are matches.

 

For support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 6 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 440-1150. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: February 5

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    4

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    1: RL6.6

    2: RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6

    3: RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6

    4: RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6

    Notes:

    Students are introduced to Dragonwings, analyzing point of view and figurative language in chapters 1-3. Multiple discussion protocols are used this week. Review them in advance to ensure smooth implementation in lessons.

     

    Protocols Resources

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task: At the end of Unit 1, students write a literary analysis of how Lawrence Yep's perspective of Chinese immigrants in San Francisco is influenced by his upbringing; the final performance task asks students to generate articles, from different perspectives, on the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.

     

    Lesson 1: Learning from the Narrator’s Point of View: Introducing Dragonwings

    Instructional Protocol: Evidence Flags, Equity Sticks,Triad Talk

    In this lesson, students are introduced to the novel and the concept of point of view. You may want to build background knowledge around the culture and the time period of the story. In addition, it would be helpful for students to learn specific characteristics about this genre (writing style, components, etc.). Create Triad lists ahead of time, students will be in the same triad for the duration of this unit. Point of view is briefly reviewed, you may want to expand depending on your students' needs. Model and provide sentence stem starters for the Point of View Anchor Chart: Claim. Set expectations and model how to complete filling out the Structured Notes routine by providing sentence stem starters, restating the question in the answer, etc.

     

    Lesson 2: Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Chapter 1

    Instructional Protocol: Back to Back, Face to Face

    The primary focus of this unit is point of view and analyzing the meaning and tone of figurative language. Students build on their previous work on figurative language from Module 2. Make sure students know how to navigate a dictionary. Review the concept of figurative language ahead of time, perhaps during do nows, or in small groups. Provide students with glossaries of some of the words that might be challenging and include synonyms and/or visuals when possible. Model and provide sentence stem starters for the graphic organizer.

     

    Lesson 3: Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Chapter 2

    Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle, Triads

    This lesson begins to “gradually release” students to work more independently: triads, pairs. The same graphic organizer is used. Keep in mind that for ELs or students with limited academic language may be unfamiliar with more vocabulary words than the ones that are mentioned in this lesson. Check for comprehension of general words that most students would know. Provide sentence stem starters for the graphic organizer or a writing frame for students that continue to need more support.

     

    Lesson 4: Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Chapter 3

    Instructional Protocol: Equity Sticks

    This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 3: students work in pairs without any teacher modeling. The difference in this lesson is that the analysis of point of view has a different focus: the focus is Moon Shadow’s point of view of his father. You may want to have pair student by mixed-ability. Some students might continue to need sentence stem starters.

  • Week 2: February 12

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    Biweekly #1

    Biweekly is Lesson 5, Mid Unit Assessment Part 1, Question 1 (RL.6.6)

    Claim: What is Moon Shadow’s point of view of the demons based on his meeting with Mr. Alger?

    Evidence: How do you know? How did Yep develop Moon Shadow’s point of view of the demons based on his meeting with Mr. Alger? Provide two examples of specific words, phrases, and sentences that support your claim about Moon Shadow’s point of view of the demons.

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: The biweekly artifact has multiple questions (3) that students must answer. Instruct students to use an additional sheet of paper for their responses so that they are not limited to the space provided in the graphic organizer. Students complete a mid-unit assessment on point of view and figurative language. They also read excerpts from Yep's autobiography, making inferences and finding text evidence to support his perspective on assimilation and policing.

     

    Protocols Resource Link

     

    Lesson 5: Mid-Unit Assessment: Developing the Narrator’s Point of View, Figurative Language, and Connecting Passages across the Novel Dragonwings

    Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle

    Question 1 on the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment serves as the biweekly artifact. Students read a passage of Dragonwings and identify and interpret the figurative language in the passage. They use the same graphic organizer they have used to track point of view throughout the novel. Students are then asked a series of short constructed-response questions about figurative language and word choice. Omit part 2 of the assessment or use it as an extension or extra credit since the primary foci of lessons 1-4 are RL.6.4 and RL.6.6.

     

    Lesson 6: Introducing The Lost Garden and Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective on What It’s Like to Fit into Another Culture on Pages 66–67 of Dragonwings

    Instructional Protocol: Think Pair Share, Equity Sticks

    In this lesson, students are introduced to Laurence Yep’s autobiography. They read three excerpts from his autobiography to identify how his culture affects his perspective. The graphic organizer introduced in this lesson is designed to support students through the rest of Unit 1. Initially this is done with a lot of teacher guidance and modeling, but over the course of the unit students are gradually released to use the graphic organizer more independently. Make sure that during the text dependent section, students fully understand the questions being asked. In addition, provide opportunities to discuss the questions before they write their responses. Model/show students how to fill out the graphic organizer and set expectations, remember that this graphic organizer will be used throughout the unit.

     

    Lesson 7: Inferring Laurence Yep’s Perspective on the Police from the Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt of The Lost Garden

    Instructional Protocol: Concentric Circles

    In this lesson, students read a second excerpt from Yep’s autobiography. The second excerpt is longer and students will only find evidence of Laurence Yep’s perspective, and fill out the first two columns on the graphic organizer. In lesson 8 they will find evidence of Yep’s perspective in Dragonwings and fill out the last column.

     

    Lesson 8: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective of the Police in Dragonwings

    Instructional Protocol:  N/A

    Students complete the final column of the graphic organizer, adding evidence of author Laurence Yep’s perspective of the police in Dragonwings. In this lesson, students are introduced to connotative language as another form of intentional word choice. Students might confuse connotations with adjectives, make sure to highlight the characteristics and differences in both. Have more examples from the text ready than the ones in the answer key, in case some students need more support with connotations.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    5: B1: RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6, W.6.11

    6: RL.6.6

    7: RL.6.6

    8: RL.6.4, RL.6.6

    Standard Assessed

    RL.6.6

  • Week 4: February 26

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7 / 8

    Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Biweekly is Lesson 6, Question 3 (RI6.4)

    Emma Burke uses the figurative language, “Water was now more precious than gold.” What does she mean by this? How do you know?

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Portions of Lesson 8 were merged with both Lessons 7 and 10 so that students can analyze the strucure of the literary analysis essay and closely examine Moon Shadow's point of view in the text as they craft a claim about it in the span of one lesson, respectively. Students continue to analyze points of view and are introduced to the structure and contents of the model literary analysis essay.

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Lesson 4: Finding the Gist of the Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity"

    Instructional Protocol: Equity Sticks

    This lesson is very similar in structure to Lesson 2 and is the first lesson in the next round of two-lesson cycles. In this lesson, students read and find the gist of a new excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity.” This excerpt will be used in the mid-unit assessment, so it important that students have a good understanding of the content.  After students have read for the gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves. Consider pre-teaching selected vocabulary based on the needs of your students.  Refer to the "Introducing, Illustrating, and Elaborating" teacher reference to help guide student discussions.

     

    Lesson 5: Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity"

    Instructional Protocol: Equity Sticks

    The structure of this lesson is similar to that of Lesson 3.  Students analyze the text for the gist, identify the author's point of view, as well as how the point of view is conveyed. Review the Author’s Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference) in supporting materials to assist students in understanding the way the author's point of view is communicated.

     

    Lesson 6: Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing the Author’s Point of View: Relief Camps

    Instructional Protocol: Vote with Your Feet

    Question 3 serves as the biweekly assessment and assesses RI6.4. In this mid-unit assessment, students read a new excerpt from Emma Burke's “Comprehending the Calamity” and analyze word/phrase meaning and the ways the author has conveyed her point of view. The graphic organizers used for this assessment are the same organizers students have been using throughout the unit so far, so they should be familiar with how to fill them out.

     

    Combine Lessons 7 and 8: Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay & Reading for Gist and Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow

    Add Lesson 8's Work Time A. to Lesson 7. Omit the remainder of Lesson 8. Have students read chapter 12 and the afterword of Dragonwings for homework.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 2

    4: RI6.3, RI6.4

    5: RI6.6

    6: RI6.3, RI6.4, RI6.6

    7: W6.2, W6.9

    8: RI6.6

    Standard Assessed

    RI.6.4

  • Week 3: February 19

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 2

    1: RI6.7, SL6.2

    2: RI6.3, RI6.4

    3: RI6.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: If time permits, it is at the teacher's discretion to combine lessons 9 and 10, but they have been omitted due to time/pacing considerations. The performance task is launched and students examine the author's point of view in "Comprehending Calamity."

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task: Students are introduced to the performance task in Unit 2's first lesson and analyze how author's purpose affects point of view. As students prepare to write their own articles to recount the earthquake, they will be equipped to consider their pupose as authors and how point of view will best convey it.

     

    Omit Lessons 9 & 10: Omit due to time/pacing considerations

    Notes if you have time to include these lessons - Lesson 9 Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle & Lesson 10 Instructional Protocol: Concentric Circles. These lessons are similar to lesson 7 & 8 except in lesson 9 the focus is on the third excerpt from the autobiography. Students can still read the last excerpt to close out his autobiography. Students will need to read chapters 6 and 7 on their own (during the Do Now, independent reading, and/or during small group time).

     

    Unit 2

    Lesson 1: Launching the Performance Task: The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire

    This lesson introduces the performance task for Unit 2 to bridge the connection between the novel in Unit 1 to the nonfiction text students will work with in Unit 2. Lesson 1 requires the viewing of a video on YouTube. Try opening the link before the lesson while in the school building to make sure that it can be viewed. Take note of the time frames in the lesson that detail when the video should start and stop. Students will continue to read the novel for homework and at the beginning of each lesson, the class discusses what was read to hold students accountable to their reading. It is important for students to continue to read the novel for homework as it will be used for their end of unit assessment.

     

    Lesson 2: Introducing “Comprehending the Calamity"

    Instructional Protocol: Concentric Circles

    To support students in this lesson, consider having pre-selected vocabulary for students to define. In some cases, it may be helpful to provide the definition of certain words to assist students in understanding the meaning of the text.

     

    Lesson 3: Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Earthquake Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

    Instructional Protocol: Equity Sticks

    Students analyze the same excerpt they read for the gist in the previous lesson. In this lesson, students identify the author's point of view as well as how it is conveyed in the text.  Read the answers for point of view for teacher reference prior to the lesson to help guide the students in identifying point of view. Refer to the Point of View anchor chart throughout the lesson for additional support. Make sure students are familiar with using the graphic organizers in this lesson as it will be used in the mid-unit assessment.

  • Week 5: March 5

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    8 / 9 / 10

    11

    12

    13

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    8: RI6.6

    9: W6.9

    10: W6.2, W6.9

    11: W6.2

    12: RI6.2, W6.2

    13: W6.2, W6.7

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Students research the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and explore the purpose of a news article.

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Combine Lessons 8, 9, and 10: Reading for Gist and Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow & Making a Claim: Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath

    Combine Work Time B of Lesson 8 with Work Time C of Lesson 10. Omit the rest of Lesson 8.

     

    Lesson 12: Analyzing the Purpose of a Newspaper Article

    Instructional Protocol: Chalk Talk

    In this lesson, students read and analyze a model to determine the purpose of a newspaper article. In addition, students are introduced to the rubric, it has been adapted to assess specific features of a newspaper article. There are two rubrics; one for student reference and one for teacher reference.

     

    Lesson 13: Researching Facts

    Instructional Protocol: Jigsaw

    In this lesson, students work in triads to research factual information about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire to use as a basis for their newspaper articles through a jigsaw. Prepare in advance, the research materials for each triad. Each triad needs one research article, and you must have enough of each article for one per student. Determine how to allocate the articles by considering the reading level of students in each triad. In addition to the article, each triad needs a glossary for their article too. You may want to highlight the difference between facts and opinions to help with identifying factual information. In addition, add more words to the glossaries where you know students will need more support.

  • Week 6: March 12

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    14

    1

    2

    3

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: In addition to the model essay, consider creating one that reflects the other parts of the play (you will play one of the characters). Give them a script in advance so that they can read it and be prepared. Create research folders, one per team of students. Within the folders there need to be enough texts so each student can have a copy of each eyewitness account, with one glossary per team. Students craft interview questions and research eyewitness accounts of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task: Students research the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, reading literary and eyewitness accounts, before writing an article from their own angle.

     

    Lesson 14: End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Literary Analysis

    This lesson serves as the third biweekly assessment. Consider drafting a model essay that reflects the writing expectations for the students being instructed.

     

    Unit 3

    Lesson 1: Writing Interview Questions

    Instructional Protocol: Triads

    In this lesson, students work in triads to write interview questions. Students begin the lesson by reading a stanza of a poem and discuss how it is connected to the other texts they have read about the earthquake so far. Since only part of the lesson focuses on interpreting figurative language from a poem, instead of spending too much time on the questions focus on analyzing the poem and addressing standards that will be tested in ANet # 3 using a poem. Integrate the standards: L.6.5, RL.6.1, RL.6.2. RL.6.4 and RL.6.5 similar to unit 1. You might be able to use some of the graphic organizers from unit 1. Use more than one stanza and spend more time with students comprehending the poem, although it is complex you can use it to address the missing standards. Here is a link to the poem

     

    Lesson 2: Researching: Eyewitness Accounts, Part 1

    In this lesson and the next, students research eyewitness accounts looking for quotes to answer their interview questions. A scene of a play, written specifically for this lesson, is used as an eyewitness account. Use this play similar to the poem in lesson 1. The lesson also includes articles that are of varying lengths in order to enable differentiation.

     

    Lesson 3: Researching: Eyewitness Accounts, Part 2

    Assessment

    Biweekly #3

    Biweekly 3 is Lesson 14, End of Unit 2 Assessment, Literary Analysis Essay

    Focus question: How do the author’s purposes affect the narrator’s point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake?

     

    Both Emma Burke and Moon Shadow discuss the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. In this assessment, you will analyze each narrator’s point of view of the immediate aftermath and explain how the author’s purpose affects the narrator’s point of view.

     

    In your essay, be sure to answer these questions:

    • What is Emma Burke’s point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake? Use evidence from the text to support your claim.

    • What is Moon Shadow’s point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake? Use evidence from the text to support your claim.

    • How do the author’s purposes affect the narrator’s points of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake?

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    14: L6.2, L6.2a, L6.2b

    Unit 3

    1: W6.2, RL6.11, W6.7

    2: RL6.11, RI6.2, W6.7

    3: RL6.11, RI6.2, W6.7

    Standards Assessed

    RI/RL.6.6

  • Week 7: March 19

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    4

    5

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    4: W6.7, SL6.2, RL6.11

    5: SL6.2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Please note that there are only two lessons listed this week due to consideration of PARCC administration. Although your school may not be administering PARCC this week, we wanted to provide flex days for you. In preparation for Lesson 9, collect age-appropriate articles from real newspapers. Students complete the mid-unit assessments on interpreting figurative language.

     

    Lesson 4: Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching the Destruction Caused by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fires

    Use this Mid-Unit Assessment as a performance task, so you can gauge students' knowledge on interpreting figurative language through a stanza and play before A3. Use a similar format as you did focusing on standards: L.6.5, RL.6.1, RL.6.2. RL.6.4 and RL.6.5.

     

    Lesson 5: Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic

    In this lesson, students orally explain the interpretation and connections of the text to what they have already read.

  • Week 8: April 2

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    6

    7

    8

    9

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    6: W6.2

    7: W6.2, W6.4a, W6.9

    8: W6.2, W6.2b, W6.2d, W6.4a, W6.9, W6.9a

    9: W6.2, W6.9, W6.9a, RI6.7

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview: Please note that there are only two lessons listed this week due to consideration of PARCC administration. Although your school may not be administering PARCC this week, we wanted to provide flex days for you. In preparation for Lesson 9, collect age-appropriate articles from real newspapers. Students complete the mid-unit assessments on interpreting figurative language.

     

    Lesson 4: Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching the Destruction Caused by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fires

    Use this Mid-Unit Assessment as a performance task, so you can gauge students' knowledge on interpreting figurative language through a stanza and play before A3. Use a similar format as you did focusing on standards: L.6.5, RL.6.1, RL.6.2. RL.6.4 and RL.6.5.

     

    Lesson 5: Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic

    In this lesson, students orally explain the interpretation and connections of the text to what they have already read.

  • Week 9: April 9

    Module

    3A

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    10

    11

    12

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    10: W6.2, W6.4a, W6.9, W6.9a, RI6.7

    11: W.6.2

    12:RI.6.2 W.6.2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview In addition to the peer critique, ensure that students have opportunities for one-on-one feedback from the teacher before the final draft is submitted. This work can be done in small groups. Also, a way to visually display students' work (e.g., The articles can be linked to a school website for the entire school community to view; a hard copy could be bound and added to the classroom library.) Students wrap up Unit 3, which culminates in the completion of the final performance task, a final draft of their newspaper article.

     

    Protocols Resource

     

    Lesson 10: End of Unit 3 Assessment: Drafting the Newspaper Article

    In this lesson, students draft their newspaper article. Assess students’ newspaper article drafts against the Newspaper Article Rubric. Some students may need additional time to finish their first drafts. Allow them to take their work home to finish it, emphasizing that it must be returned in the next lesson.

     

    Lesson 11: Revising the Newspaper Article: Sentence Structure and Transitions

    Students have mini lessons on sentence structure and appropriate transitions to improve the flow of their article. Students then revise their newspaper articles inline with the content of the mini lessons.

     

    Lesson 12: Performance Task: Final Draft of the Newspaper Article

    Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle

    This is the Final Performance Task. In this lesson, students perform a peer critique. Set up expectations for the peer critique carefully to ensure students feel safe giving and receiving feedback. Establish clear guidelines for behavior, to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria in the rubric, etc.