Q4 6th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 4: Topic: Reading for Research and Writing an Argument

Insecticides: Costs vs. Benefits

 

In this nine-week, research-based module, students explore the benefits and harmful consequences of the use of the controversial pesticide DDT.

 

In Unit 1, students begin the novel Frightful’s Mountain (640L) by Jean Craighead George. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to think about the interactions between people and the natural world. They also will read informational texts and watch videos to gather evidence and trace arguments about the uses, benefits, and harmful consequences of DDT, its affects on the environment, and its use in the battle against malaria. At the end of this unit, students will participate in a Fishbowl discussion to begin to articulate their evidence-based opinions about the central question: “Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?”

 

In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the how the main character, Frightful, is affected by the actions of other people and her own interactions with the natural world. Students also will engage in a research project, continuing to explore the central question of the module. Students will read several complex texts, both print and digital, in order to collect relevant information in a structured researcher’s notebook. To help them grapple with this issue, students learn a decision-making process called “Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making” (see the end of this document for details). This process will help students understand the implications of various choices, and will scaffold their ability to determine—based on evidence and their own values—what they believe can and should happen. Unit 2 culminates with students synthesizing all their reading thus far in order to make and present their own evidence-based claim about the use of DDT.

 

In Unit 3, students choose the most compelling evidence and write a position paper in which they support the claim they made (at the end of Unit 2). As a mid-unit assessment, students will submit their best draft of this position paper. As an end of unit assessment, students will submit a published copy, as well as a reflection on the writing process. As the final performance task, students share their findings by creating a scientific poster and presenting that poster to peers during a hosted gallery. This task addresses R.6.1, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.4, and L.6.6.

 

ANet Resources

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 6 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 440-1150. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    L1: RL6.1

    L2: RI6.8

    L3: SL6.3

     

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students are introduced to close reading practices they will use as they read Frightful's Mountain. They will also build background knowledge about the peregrine falcon, which is Frightful's species. Furthermore, students will trace a speaker's argument.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students' explore the benefits of consequences of using the pesticide DDT. At the close of the unit, the participate in a Fishbowl discussion, articulating their evidence based opinions about whether or not the benefits of using DDT outweigh the consequences, which prepares them for the final position paper they will complete in Unit 3 that address the same topic.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Launching Frightful’s Mountain: Building Background Knowledge and Establishing Reading Routines

    Instructional Protocol: Think-Pair-Share

    This first lesson is designed to engage students in the novel Frightful’s Mountain and the broader issue of human needs and the natural world. This lesson introduces close reading practices that will be built on throughout this module. Students may be familiar with many of the routines from previous modules; adjust pacing as needed. Look closely at the cover of Frightful’s Mountain and the map; read Chapter 1, “Frightful Takes Off” in advance since the teacher will be reading it aloud.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Close Reading and Gathering Evidence from Frightful’s Mountain and “Welcome Back”

    Instructional Protocol: Jigsaw

    This lesson asks students to be grouped in heterogeneous groups of four where they will be working together to learn about peregrine falcons. Prepare a “Peregrine Falcon Facts” anchor chart in advance to chart student responses during the whole class discussion. This chart will be used in subsequent lessons. Considerations: have groups planned in advance and projected (these groups can be used again for the next lesson), assign parts of the fact sheet to each member in the group, read “Welcome Back” to identify the focus, main idea, and text-based evidence prior to the read aloud.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Tracing a Speaker’s Argument: John Stossel DDT Video

    This lesson is the first in a series of lessons in which students identify an author’s or speaker’s argument and claims they make that are supported with evidence. The lesson gives students an opportunity to practice tracing an argument first with partners and then independently. Collecting the graphic organizer can be used to provide a formative assessment of student understanding of the learning targets. In the mid-unit assessment, students will watch a video and fill in a “Tracing an Argument” graphic organizer so students will need to practice these skills. Note: use the filter service www.safeshare.tv to filter content that may be inappropriate for students when using YouTube or social media videos. Considerations: place students in the same groups they were in during the previous lesson, cut quotes into strips and preview the “John Stossel - DDT” video prior to the lesson. This video will be watched twice. Take note of the times that it will be stopped on the second viewing.

  • Week 2: April 23

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment

    Biweekly #1

    Lesson 7, Tracing an Argument Graphic Organizer

    Utilize the last two questions as the bi-weekly assessment:

    - After identifying the claims and evidence presented by this author, what argument do you think she/he is making?

    - After evaluating the evidence that supports each claim, is the overall argument supported by sufficient evidence? Explain why or why not.

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    The mid-unit assessment is set to be given next week (on Monday). But, teachers can use their discretion, in conjunction with students' needs, to determine whether or not to administer the mid-unit assessment this week on Friday or next week on Monday. Students identify how text features support arguments in addition to identifying claims and evidence in multiple texts.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Citing Evidence and Building Vocabulary: “The Exterminator”

    In this lesson, students are introduced to the article “The Exterminator” where they will also complete a second reading. During student discussion, it may be helpful to provide students with sentence starters to frame their responses. Consider using “One signal that peregrine falcons use is …” and “On page #__, I noticed …”  In advance, create a Scientific Word Wall for scientific words. Include category headings so students can add words to the Scientific Word Wall in future lessons. Categories include: Chemicals, Disease, Processes, Sciences/Scientists, Living Things, Other.  This word wall will be used at the end of the lesson and subsequent lessons.  Note: The side grey bars in the text will not be read aloud during this lesson but will be addressed in a future lesson.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Annotating the Text and Identifying Argument, Claims, and Evidence: “Double Whammy” Excerpt from “The Exterminator”

    Instructional Protocol: Think-Pair-Share

    This lesson continues to build routines for discussion of Frightful’s Mountain. For the student discussion piece, consider having having the New York map and migration insert, opposite the title page, projected as students discuss this lesson to help guide their thinking and keep student engagement. Students will continue to practice annotating informational text and identifying the author’s argument, claims, and evidence, which will also be practiced in subsequent lessons. While reading, consider giving students smaller chunks of the passage to read or be paired with a strong reader to support their comprehension of the text. Use a document camera to model how to fill in the graphic organizer with special attention given to writing an argument, claim, and supporting evidence to prepare students for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 8. Read the paragraph preceding “Double Whammy” to determine the argument, claims, and evidence to help guide student discussion.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Identifying How Text Features Support Arguments: “The Exterminator”

    Instructional Protocol: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face

    In this lesson, students use text features to locate additional evidence that contributes to the author’s argument and claim from the text “The Exterminator.”  Students may struggle with reading the passage so consider having a listening station with an audio version of the text readily available.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Getting the Gist and Tracing an Argument: “Public Fear” Excerpt from “The Exterminator”

    Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle, Ink-Pair-Share

    -Bi-weekly assessment 1 is found in the Tracing an Argument graphic organizer and assesses RI.6.8. Utilize the last two questions as the bi-weekly assessment: After identifying the claims and evidence presented by this author, what argument do you think she/he is making? After evaluating the evidence that supports each claim, is the overall argument supported by sufficient evidence? Explain why or why not.

    -Students continue their discussion of the text in their triads. The previous lessons have built habits in students to complete this lesson’s task independently. Once they complete the task independently, they will be given the opportunity to discuss their findings with a partner.  During the Mix and Mingle section of the lesson, consider projecting the directions and guiding questions for student reference. In advance: Read the text features closely and prepare a task card to model finding evidence that contributes to the author’s argument; consider assigning reading passages in advance; project the steps to reading in triads to keep groups on track. Some students may benefit from being given the claim on their task card and then looking for evidence within the text features. Others may benefit from sentence starters to help guide their thinking. A Wikipedia page is used in this lesson which may include inappropriate content via comment banks and ads.  Preview the page in advance and use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, when viewing these links in the classroom.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    L4: RI6.1 L6.6

    L5: RI6.8

    L6: RI6.1 RI6.8 L6.6

    L7/8: RI6.1 RI6.8, SL6.3

    Standards Assessed

    B1: RI.6.8

  • Week 3: April 30

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10

    11 / 12

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    L9: SL6.2, SL6.2a, W6.1, W6.9

    L10: SL6.2, SL6.2a, W6.1, W6.9

    L11/12: SL6.2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students do not actually participate in a Fishbowl discussion until Lesson 13, which serves as the End of Unit assessment. They revisit the same video of a Fishbowl discussion from Lesson 9. Since students will prepare for Lesson 13 by watching a video either for homework or during small group centers, consider setting up Google Classroom so that all students can independently access the video and complete the notecatcher associated with it. Students complete the Mid-Unit assessment in Lesson 8, create Cascading Consequence Charts, interpret,and share information that they learn about DDT in preparation for their Fishbowl discussion in Lesson 13.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Tracing an Argument in an Article and a Video

    Use the Mid-Unit Assessment as a Performance Task and to assess RI6.8. The Mid-Unit Assessment uses both a text and a video. The video link in the engage lesson plan is broken, but you can download it from here. The video will be viewed twice to get the gist and later to find the evidence. Consider spreading this assessment across two lessons if students need the extra time. The questions and graphic organizers in this assessment closely parallel the types of questions and graphic organizers that students worked on in earlier lessons.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Interpreting and Connecting Information: Creating a Cascading Consequence Chart Using Frightful’s Mountain

    Instructional Protocol: Fishbowl

    In the second half of this unit, students build on work previously done with argument, claims, and evidence. This module focuses on two of the steps in the Stakeholders Consequences Decision-Making process. In this lesson, students are introduced to the Cascading Consequences chart. Students will continue to add to this chart over the course of the unit. They will refer to this chart throughout the module for several important reasons, including to determine who the stakeholders are for the issue they are learning about and to use as a reference for writing about their position on the issue. This Cascading Consequence chart will help students prepare for their Fishbowl discussion during their End of Unit 1 Assessment. Students will get more practice with the Cascading Consequences chart in Lessons 10 and 11, when they apply the decision-making strategy to the topic of DDT. The DDT Cascading Consequences chart will be the visual assessed at the End of Unit 1 Assessment.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Using Multiple Resources of Information: Creating a Cascading Consequences Chart about DDT and Practicing a Fishbowl Discussion

    Instructional Protocol: Fishbowl

    In this lesson, students create Cascading Consequences charts about two different opinions concerning the use of DDT. Students use information from the various sources they used in previous lessons about the use of DDT to create two Cascading Consequences chart: One that explores the benefits of DDT and one that explores the harmful consequences of DDT. Consider having all materials organized into the two categories. During the Fishbowl discussion students will interpret and share the claims and evidence they have identified and documented.

     

    Combine Lessons 11 & 12:

    Interpreting, Integrating, and Sharing Information about DDT: Using Charts and Graphs & Cascading Consequences and Fishbowl Protocol

    Instructional Protocols: Jigsaw (Lesson 11) & Fishbowl (Lesson 12)

    • Condense Jigsaw in Lesson 11 to 15 minutes. Students can work at each station for 5 minutes and reconvene to share their findings for 5 minutes.
    • Omit Opening A in Lesson 11 and Lesson 12.
    • Omit Work Time B in Lesson 12. Students can watch the video on Fishbowl and complete the Fishbowl notecatcher either during small group workstations or for homework.
    • Omit Closing and Assessment from Lesson 11.Students can reflect on the graphic organizer process as they organize materials for the Closing and Assessment portion of Lesson 12.

     

    Lesson 11:

    This lesson builds on Lesson 10. Students integrate information from different media and formats and interpret charts, graphs, etc. and add to their DDT Cascading Consequences charts. Prepare in advance: the two Interpreting Charts and Graphs anchor charts. Model filling out this anchor chart during the lesson for students to see the thinking behind and the process of completing this organizer. Students will rotate into six stations, think about the logistics and procedures you want for the rotations. Each station should have four copies of each text, it will allow students the freedom to choose from multiple materials in a limited amount of time.

     

    Lesson 12:

    This lesson continues the series of lessons scaffolding students toward using arguments, claims, and evidence found in different resources to develop Cascading Consequences charts and sharing their knowledge in a Fishbowl discussion. Students will refine and interpret their Cascading Consequences charts as they prepare to discuss and advocate persuasively the benefits and harmful effects of DDT using the Fishbowl protocol. Students work with many materials during the Fishbowl so think of options for organizing all the materials.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    13

    1

    2

    3

    Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Lesson 2, Comparing and Contrasting Authors’ Presentation Graphic Organizer

    Utilize the question, Which article is more effective in its argument? Why?

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 1

    L13: SL6.2a

    Unit 2

    L1: W6.7, W6.8

    L2: RI6.9, W6.8

    L3: RI6.9

    Standard Assessed

    B2: RI.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students complete a Fishbowl discussion as the End of Unit Assessment for Unit 1, and Unit 2 launches with students getting the gist of articles by environmentalist Rachel Carson and compare how she presents ideas about DDT as they conduct further research on this topic.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students conduct research and compare authors' presentation of ideas about the benefits and consequences of DDT. The continue to compile text based evidence using Cascading Consequences charts, which prepares them to make a claim for the end of Unit 2 assessment, which they will use as the claim for their final position paper.

     

    Lesson 13:

    End of Unit Assessment: Fishbowl Discussion

    Instructional Protocol: Fishbowl -Inner Outer Circle

    Use the End of Unit Assessment as a performance task and to assess Speaking and Listening standards. For this assessment, smaller groups of students are in the inner circle at any given time, as their classmates observe. The inner and outer circle rotations involve plenty of student interaction and movement. Allow time for students to exchange places and for assessing students. Consider having the biweekly after this performance task.

     

    Unit 2

    Lesson 1:

    Getting the Gist and Paraphrasing: “Rachel Carson: Environmentalist and Writer”

    Instructional Protocol: Think Pair Share

    In order to guide students through the research process, this unit relies on multiple structures of organization (that need to be prepared prior to lesson 1) and note-taking. Students will have to organize several materials they will use such as a research notebook, folder, WebQuest, calendar, texts, etc. Students will continue to read the novel Frightful’s Mountain, primarily as homework, but the reading will lead to this unit's topic. This research is intentionally guided, with plenty of scaffolding from the teacher. It is strongly recommended to mark paragraphs 1-11, 18-20, and 31-33 for students to read and use in their research. In today’s lesson, students complete page 1 of the notebook to set a purpose for their research and define key vocabulary in the research question. They also reflect on their learning about the benefits of DDT, its harmful consequences and wondering they still have about DDT. Consider forming partnerships. If possible make connections about the benefits/harmful consequences of DDT and a current event such as the Zika virus.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Applying Research Skills: “Rachel Carson: Environmentalist and Writer”

    • The Biweekly assessment can be found in the Comparing and Contrasting Authors’ Presentation graphic organizer. Utilize the question, Which article is more effective in its argument? Why? (RI.6.9). In this lesson, after students compare two articles by identifying and comparing their claims, evidences, and text features, they evaluate the credibility of each source by determining which one has a more effective argument.
    • In this lesson, students begin recording the authors, titles, sources, and dates of the sources they use to collect information. They also begin to assess the credibility of research texts. The process of evaluating sources is an important part of their learning, as well as a model for developing and expressing relevant information and opinions. Students will use and reread the “Rachel Carson: Environmentalist and Writer” from Lesson 1, but in this lesson they will add both bibliographic and credibility source information to the researcher’s notebook. In this lesson and in Lesson 3, students will read different articles on a similar topic. This helps students move toward mastery of RI.6.9, in which students compare and contrast one author’s presentation of ideas with that of another. Consider ways for students to have interactions with each other about the information they are adding: TT, Give One-Get One, Mix and Mingle, Corners, etc.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Comparing an Author’s Presentation of Ideas: “Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution”

    In this lesson, students build their comparing and contrasting skills by analyzing how two different authors portray the same information or event on the graphic organizer from lesson 2. Students will note the articles’ similarities and differences by looking at how the authors introduce the event, use various types of evidence, and use text features. Make sure you provide sentences stems to track accountable talk for standard RI.6.9 not only for their discussions but also in their writing: Both articles ___ and ___take place _____. Even though both articles present ___, the differences are ___

  • Week 5: May 14

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7 / 8

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 2

    L4: L6.4, W6.7, W6.8

    L5: L6.4, W6.7, W6.8

    L6: L6.5, RI6.9

    L7/8: W6.7, W6.8

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students continue to conduct research about DDT and compare authors' presentation of events.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Research Tasks: New Words, Relevant Information, Revision

    Instructional Protocol: Triads

    In this lesson, time is dedicated to understanding the terminology, with a particular focus on using Greek and Latin affixes, or prefixes and suffixes to determine word meaning. It offers all students, and in particular ELs and struggling readers, a guide for understanding text. Try to make connections when possible to their home language with the help of students. Here are online guides to Latin roots and Greek roots. In previous lessons, students used the researcher’s notebook to gather notes while thinking about the research question and evaluating the credibility of the source and whether the article helped them consider the research question and think of new questions relevant to their claim about DDT. Students apply their skills of filling out those sources as they read a new article. They work in triads to identify source information, claims or ideas, and details or evidence from the article. Challenge students to read closely for information on both sides of the argument about the use of DDT.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Resource Materials and Gathering Information: Reading Another “Choice” Text from the Research Folder

    In this lesson, students continue to build ways to determine word meaning by using dictionaries and thesauruses  Based on your students’ background knowledge with these reference materials, consider modifying your Work Time. Students will choose another article from their research folder and continue to develop paraphrasing skills and identify the author’s claim or central idea. They will also determine supporting evidence for each claim or central idea, use quotation marks to quote the author’s exact words, and record source information to give credit to the author of the article.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Presentation of Events: Comparing Two Authors

    In this lesson, students read two articles from different authors that provide additional information about DDT. Students look closely at how the authors introduce their positions and use evidence and text features to support ideas. Students must compare and contrast different authors’ presentation of information. The new article is at a challenging Lexile measure. To support students, consider highlighting how the author introduces the article, what evidence the author includes, and if there are any text features employed to support the argument. After reading and comparing/contrasting the two articles, students must reflect on any new information presented and how that affects their own thoughts about the benefits and consequences of DDT.

     

    Combine Lessons 7 and 8:

    Researching Digital Sources, Parts 1 and 2: Guided WebQuest

    Instructional Protocol: Mix and Mingle

    In Lessons 7 and 8, students will have an opportunity to use websites to gather more information on their research question. They will complete Sources 4 and 5 in their researcher’s notebook using internet articles. This research will take the form of a guided WebQuest. Students receive a list of internet resources on the topic of DDT and determine which source is most relevant to their questions, students choose what to read from the menu of resources. Consider posting the links on a class webpage or online document so it is easier for students to follow the links instead of spending time typing it. Students will each need access to a computer. In advance, model an internet research process for students. Support students that are having difficulties with internet research. Consider giving students time to compare and share their work, it will help support students that are having difficulties.

  • Week 6: May 21

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #3

    Lesson 9, Mid-Unit Assessment, Comparing and Contrasting Authors’ Presentation Graphic Organizer

    Utilize the question, Which article is more effective in building an argument? Why?

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 2

    L9: RI6.9, L6.4, W6.7, W6.8

    L10: RI6.9

    L11: RI6.9, W6.9, SL6.4

    L12: SL6.4

    Standard Assessed

    B3: RI.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students complete the Mid Unit 2 Assessment and formulate research based claims.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Mid-Unit Assessment Comparing and Contrasting Two Texts: Simulated Research

    • Biweekly assessment 3 comes from the Comparing and Contrasting Authors’ Presentation graphic organizer Utilize the question: Which article is more effective in building an argument? Why?
    • In this lesson, students will complete the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, on which they will apply these same skills: read an article and identify source information, paraphrase claims, and cite supporting evidence. Students are asked to read two informational articles and compare and contrast the two author's presentations of malaria and DDT. After reading, students are asked to complete a “simulated research” page identical to a page in their researcher’s notebooks. The assessment is meant to assess students' capacity to conduct an ongoing research project. Finally, students will complete a Research Vocabulary graphic organizer identical to the one they’ve used since the beginning of this unit.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Cascading Consequences Chart

    This lesson introduces students to new independent reading books and launches the End of Unit 2 assessment. This lesson has students think analytically about the research they collected in their researcher’s notebook. They code relevant information into two categories: Benefits of DDT or Harmful Consequences of DDT. The coded information will be added to either of the Cascading Consequences charts from Unit 1. Make sure the chart is available for students so that new information can be added in today’s lesson. Students may need to tape blank sheets of paper onto their charts.

     

    Lesson 11:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Creating Stakeholders Charts

    Instructional Protocol: Four Corners

    In this lesson, students will be introduced to a Stakeholders Impacts chart, prepare to introduce it and model the process. The next step in the decision-making process, students will weigh the impacts of the use of DDT on stakeholders and apply personal values to each stakeholder affected. The Stakeholders Impacts chart can also be used as a visual to support students’ claim in the End of Unit 2 Assessment. Students will also consider if they selected an appropriate book for their independent reading. As students prepare for their End of Unit 2 Assessment, review the criteria students will be evaluated on for their formal presentation.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Cascading Consequences Chart

    Instructional Protocol: Concentric Circle

    This lesson represents a shift for students, now they will be drafting their own claim and identifying evidence to support their claim. Students are reintroduced to the Forming Evidence-Based Claims task worksheet used throughout Module 2. Students will work in pairs and have an opportunity to share their claim and evidence with peers in a Concentric Circle activity. Consider preparing a resource area for students. This should include the articles and charts and graphs students have read and analyzed throughout Units 1 and 2. Also, consider having a listening station for review of the two videos from Unit 1.

  • Week 7: May 28

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    13 / 14

    15

    1

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 2

    L13/14: SL6.4, SL6.5

    L15: RI6.9, SL6.4, SL6.5, SL6.6

    Unit 3

    L1: W6.1, W6.5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    In preparation for Lessons 13 and 14, review students' drafts and provide feedback before they work with partners to revise their drafts. Watch the video in Lesson 13 ahead of time and highlight or guide students on the speaking techniques and the information used by the speaker to support an idea. Students prepare to present their research based claims by watching a video and participating in peer critique, in addition to receiving feedback from their teacher.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students draft, revise, edit, and publish their research-based position papers. Based on this paper, students create a scientific poster, which serves as the final performance task.

     

    Combine Lessons 13 and 14:

    Presenting a Research-Based Claim: Effective Speaking Techniques & Visual Aid and Peer Critique

    Instructional Protocol: Back to Back, Face to Face

    • Combine Work Time B for Lesson 13 and 14. Only play two minutes of the video so that criteria for delivering a speech can be reviewed in under 5 minutes.
    • Omit Work Time A in Lesson 14. Students can work on their visual representations for homework.
    • Omit Exit Ticket from Lesson 14. As students will have time to work on unfinished work for homework.
    • Lesson 13:  Guide students with detailed revision critique suggestions. In this lesson, students observe a model of good speaking techniques by watching a video.
    • Lesson 14: This lesson focuses on creating a visual aid to support the claim and findings, preparing their notecards for the presentation, and practicing their presentation with a peer. Students will continue to work on notecards that include their claim, three pieces of relevant and supporting evidence, and information about their reasoning and point of view for their presentations. Again, students can do some of the work at home (See notes on omission and parts of Lesson 13 and 14 that can be combined).

     

    Lesson 15:

    End of Unit 2 Assessment: A Hosted Gallery Walk

    Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk

    Use the End of Unit Assessment as a Performance task and to provide data on students' proficiency with Listening and Speaking standards. In this lesson, students will present their positions on DDT and the balance of human needs and the condition of the natural world. They will share their claim and supporting evidence to peers in a hosted Gallery Walk as an End of Unit 2 Assessment.

     

    Unit 3

    Lesson 1:

    Analyze Model Position Paper with Rubric

    Consider how to communicate with families, such as sending a letter home about students’ independent reading goals, as well as the Reading Tracker and Reviewer’s. Students have already began preparing for the writing portion of this module in the last unit and will be using the materials from previous lesson (research folder, Author's Presentation Events graphic organizer, etc.). Students are introduced to the Position Paper Argument Rubric; make sure you study a well-written example of this kind of writing. In this lesson, the focus is on introducing a topic, and using claim, reasons, and evidence along with academic and domain-specific vocabulary. Students will work with a partner to use the rubric to assess the model essay.

  • Week 8: June 4

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    2 / 3

    4 / 5

    6

    7

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 3

    L2/3: W6.1, W6.5, L6.6

    L4/5: W6.1, W6.5

    L6: W6.2, L6.1

    L7: W6.5, L6.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    For combined lessons 2 and 3, consider preparing a resource area in the room where students can have access to articles and other resources from Units 1 and 2 if needed. Students plan and write the first draft of their final position paper. They receive feedback from their peers in order to revise and publish their papers.

     

    Combine Lesson 2 and Lesson 3:

    Planning the Argument & Body Paragraphs: Writing the Claim, Reasons &  and Evidence

    • Omit Lesson 2 Opening A since the independent reading check in does not directly influence students progress towards mastery of the performance task.
    • Condense Work Time A for Lesson 2 to three minutes. Students can refer to the steps for organizing a position paper handout; more time needs to be devoted to the model essay and students' development of their own ideas. Instead of having students break into groups, just review the steps and check for understanding.
    • Omit Closing and Assessment for Lesson 2. Instead of conducting a Fist to Five to informally assess how well students think they understand the learning targets, use this time collect more concrete data based on students' claims, reasons, and evidence.
    • Combine Lesson 3's Work Time A & Closing and Assessment. Teachers can point out the types of domain specific vocabulary and transition words that students are expected to incorporate within their essays.
    • Students can continue to write and plan their body paragraphs for homework.

     

    Combine Lessons 4 and 5:

    Actions for a Position Paper: Identify, Discuss, Write & Mid-Unit Assessment: Completing My Draft Position Paper

    Students are introduced to the Parts of a Position Paper anchor chart. The focus is for students to solidify their plan by expressing it, not providing peer feedback. Students will also identify transitional words used in the model and review the Planning My Body Paragraphs graphic organizer to identify domain-specific vocabulary. It will be helpful to provide 2-3 examples for the parts of the position paper anchor chart. Have students write on every other line as they write their drafts. This allows space for revisions in future lessons. By the end of this lesson, students should have finished their body paragraph drafts (introduction and conclusion). In lesson 5, the Mid-Unit Assessment, students complete their draft. This is a good opportunity to combine these two lessons, since students work at a different pace, some students might be able to work on their own while you provide supports to those that need it. Those students who have not finished would benefit from working to complete their draft (possibly after school). Prepare in advance: the new Transitions anchor chart.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Peer Critique and Revising: Formal English

    In this lesson, students prepare to review and revise their writing, they now focus on using formal English and transition words in their position papers. Teacher's feedback on the drafts is not required until Lesson 7. Students will provide peer feedback on one another's writing: transitions, compare informal and formal English to recognize the difference, and distinguish what is appropriate for expressing their information in their position paper. Remind students about peer feedback expectations and protocols.

     

    Lesson 7:

    End of Unit Assessment: Revising and Publishing

    This is the End-of -Unit Assessment. However, use this as a performance task. In this lesson, students review the third row of the Position Paper Argument Rubric, focusing on vocabulary. Students define stylistically sophisticated language, domain-specific vocabulary, and a notable sense of voice to gain an understanding of the rubric. Students are asked to compare the difference between a 3 and a 4 on the rubric. Students then write their final, best version of their drafts and self-assess them against the Position Paper Argument Rubric. The opening is to review students' independent reading, this can also be given as homework prior to this lesson, in small groups, or as an independent activity.

  • Week 9: June 11

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    8 / 9

    10

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Unit 3

    L8/9: W6.4, W6.5

    L10: W6.4, L6.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students draft and complete the final version of their scientific posters to display them in a gallery walk.

     

    Lessons 8 and 9:

    Completing Reflection: Preparing & Finishing Poster for Presentation & Preparing for Gallery Walk

    In these lessons, students reflect on how following the six steps of the writing process helped improve their writing. Also, students draft a plan for their scientific poster for a hosted Gallery Walk in Lesson 10. Students look at a model and criteria list and consider what to include on their poster. Some students might be ready to start work working on the final draft of their poster. Consider having students complete them for homework.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Performance Task: Hosted Gallery Walk of Scientific Posters

    Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk, One-Word-Go-Around

    Today is a celebration of all the hard work students have put into their research, their position papers, and their scientific posters. Divide students into two groups, one will “host” their scientific posters while the other students walk around the “gallery” providing positive feedback. Then they will switch so all students have the opportunity to both host and observe the work of their peers.