Q4 7th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 4A: Topic: Reading and Research: Screen Time and the Developing Brain

This nine-week module focuses on a “science and society” topic, engaging students in reading compelling informational text about adolescent brain development and the effects of entertainment screen time on the brain. In Unit 1, students first read various texts that will build their background knowledge about adolescent brain development in general. Their learning will center around three areas of the brain, namely the pre-frontal cortex, the limbic system, and the developing neurons. Students determine main ideas and evidence in diverse media and clarify their learning about this complex content. Then they begin to focus on the issue of screen time and how it may affect teenagers. In Unit 2, they begin to read argument texts. They trace arguments and evaluate the soundness of reasoning and the sufficiency and relevancy of evidence in the texts and media that they engage with in this unit. They dive deeper into first the potential benefits and then the potential risks of screen time by participating in a robust research project. To organize their research sources and information, students use a researcher’s notebook. Then students conduct Internet-based research. Throughout Unit 2, students engage in many conversations to synthesize and clarify their learning.

 

To help students grapple with this issue, the second half of Unit 2 introduces students to a modified decision-making process called Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making (see the end of this document for details). This process will help students understand the implications of various choices and will scaffold their ability to determine, based on evidence and their own values, what they themselves believe should happen. Unit 3 marks the transition from research to writing as students plan and draft a position paper, addressing the question: “After examining both the potential benefits and risks of entertainment screen time, particularly to adolescent development, make a recommendation. Should the AAP raise the recommended daily entertainment screen time from two hours to four hours?” Students have several opportunities for feedback and revision during this unit. As a final performance task, students publish and share a visual representation of their position paper. This task centers on RI.7.1, W.7.1, W.7.4, and L.7.6.

 

ANet Resources

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 7 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 690-1090. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RI 7.1, RI 7.2, RI 7.5, SL 7.2

    Lesson 2: RI 7.1, RL 7.2, RI 7.4, L 7.4

    Lesson 3: RI 7.1, RI 7.7, SL 7.2

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Throughout the module, articles can be enhanced with visuals to support student learning. For example, diagrams can be added to compare adult and teenage brains. Students will revisit the Gallery Walk in Lesson 7, as they reflect on their key learnings in this unit and any lingering questions they may have. Students learn about the developing adolescent brain by analyzing texts to determine their main idea and supporting details.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    In Unit 1, students learn about the adolescent brain's development and the effects of screen time on the developing brain. For their final performance task, students produce a written position paper in which they make a claim about whether or not the recommended amount of daily screen time should increase.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Introducing Module 4A; This is Your Brain-Plugged In

    Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk

    Text: “The Teen Brain: Under Construction.”

    The Gallery Walk protocol is modified in this lesson; its purpose is to pique interest, not to share text-based information. Students silently study the display of video and images, and then record observations and questions to help build background knowledge, foster community, and spark curiosity.  Some of the Gallery Walk items are suggestions, consider which items to post.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details: What’s Going on in the Teenage Brain?

    Text: “Teens and Decision Making”

    The homework assignment for this lesson contains complex vocabulary. Provide scaffolds as needed for students as well as visuals to aid students with understanding what parts of the brain the text is addressing.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Comparing Text to Multimedia: Understanding How the Brain Changes

    Texts: “The Child’s Developing Mind” and “Teens and Decision Making”

    The homework article contains complex vocabulary and highly technical terms. Provide scaffolds and visuals as needed. Also, consider previewing the article in class to set students up for success with homework completion.

  • Week 2: April 23

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #1, Lesson 5, Mid-Unit Assessment, Part II. Informational Video Clip

    Utilize the following question for the bi-weekly assessment (students should complete independently): Watch the second clip of the video carefully. Then fill in the chart below. You will watch the clip twice.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4: RI 7.7, SL 7.2

    Lesson 5: RI.7.7, SL.7.2

    Lesson 6: RI 7.1, RI 7.2, RI 7.10, L 7.4

    Lesson 7: RI 7.1, RI 7.5, RI 7.10, L 7.4

    Standard Assessed

    B1: SL.7.2.

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    With each lesson, keep in mind how they connect to the final performance task in Unit 3 and where the lessons note to emphasize language and or key learnings that students will need to incorporate in their final position papers. Students conduct close readings to excerpts of texts that provide insight on the biology of the human brain and the effects of video games on it. In Lesson 5, students complete the mid-unit assessment.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Analyzing the Main Idea in Video: Understanding the Limbic System

    Text: “Insight into the Teenage Brain”

    Video: Understanding the Limbic System

    This lesson focuses on SL.7.2, a standard that students have not worked with in previous modules. Applying an analysis of the main idea and supporting details to the content of a video is nuanced. Students’ familiarity with the neurologist notebook will help them with their work on this new standard because it is structurally the same as the Main Ideas and Supporting Details note-catcher that they use in this lesson.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Development of the Young Brain

    For Bi-weekly Assessment 1, utilize Part II. Informational Video Clip. Utilize the following question (students should complete independently): Watch the second clip of the video carefully. Then fill in the chart below. You will watch the clip twice. (SL.7.2)

     

    Lesson 6:

    Close Reading: Excerpt 2 of “The Digital Revolution and the

    Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    Text: “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    The close reading and text-dependent questions in this lesson will guide students to identify the main ideas of the article that are most relevant to their position paper in Unit 3. Collect the “Summarize Your Learning” homework from Lesson 5 and use it to identify students who may need some additional instruction to understand the basics of brain development before moving on to how brain science relates to the digital revolution. This is foundational learning that they will need in order to be successful throughout the remainder of this unit and in Units 2 and 3.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Close Reading: Excerpt 3 of “The Digital Revolution and the

    Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    Text: “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    This excerpt centers on the effects of video games on the brain. Because students will be reading several texts about video games in Unit 2, this lesson is  important. Be sure to take the time in Work Time A to record key information on the class Brain Development anchor chart. Students will continue to focus on the last column of their anchor chart, writing “if/then” statements. This practice will scaffold the students toward creating their position paper in Unit 3. Emphasize the importance of using words and phrases like “may” and “it seems reasonable” to mirror the cautionary tone of scientists.

  • Week 3: April 30

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    8

    9

    10

    1

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 8: RI 7.1, RI 7.10, L 7.4

    Lesson 9: RI 7.1, RI 7.2

    Lesson 10: RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.5, L.7.4

    Lesson 1: RI.7.3,  W.7.8

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    In lessons 8 and 9, consider strategic partnerships to support students with grappling with the complexity of this scientific text. Students continue to build background knowledge about how technology impacts brain development as they determine the main idea and support details of the texts they read. They also complete the end of unit assessment in Lesson 10, where they determine the main idea and supporting details of an informational text. Unit 2 begins this week, and students become familiarized with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and its protocol for recommendations.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students conduct independent research about how the brain's development is impacted by screen time, after which they participate in a decision making process that results in them taking a stance on whether to recommend either two or four hours of daily screen time for their final position paper.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Close Reading: Excerpt 5 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    Instructional Protocol: Quiz-Quiz-Trade

    Text: “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution”

    Students will work more independently today on the text-dependent question activity this this will be their third time working through a similar exercise. Collect, but do not grade Homework: Excerpt 4 of “The Digital Revolution and the Adolescent Brain Evolution.” Use it as formative assessment since students will need it again in Lesson 9.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Analyzing Main Ideas and Supporting Details: “Growing Up Digital”

    Text: “Growing Up Digital”

    Students return to the neurologist’s notebook and work with RI.7.1 and RI.7.2 once more before the end of unit assessment in Lesson 10. Work Time B is devoted to analyzing the main idea and the structure of the text. Return homework from Lesson 8 so that students can use it to complete tasks in this lesson.

     

    Lesson 10:

    End of Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text

    Students analyze the main idea of an informational text in this assessment.

     

    Unit 2

    Lesson 1:

    Analyzing Interactions: Launching the Unit

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talks

    Students examine the actual AAP recommendations and the process the AAP uses to create its recommendations.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Assessment

    Bi-weekly 2

    Lesson 3, Tracing and Argument Note-catcher

    • Utilize the 2nd Notecatcher that students complete as the biweekly assessment
    • Students should complete the 2nd note-catcher independently

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 2: RI.7.8

    Lesson 3: RI.7.8  SL.7.3

    Lesson 4: W.7.7

    Lesson 5: W.7.8

    Standards Assessed

    B2: RI.7.8, SL.7.3

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Consider how the researcher’s notebook should be organized and stored (starting in Lesson 4). Students practice evaluating the arguments within text, are introduced to the research question for Unit 2.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Logic and Argument: Evaluating the Argument in “Beyond the Brain”

    In Work Time B, students use the criteria they built for evaluating evidence to trace a central claim and the use of evidence in an excerpt from the text “Beyond the Brain.” This skill will be reinforced throughout the next several lessons through the use of the Tracing the Argument note-catcher, which is introduced today. Students will use this note-catcher repeatedly to trace and evaluate arguments in texts and videos.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Evaluating an Argument: “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”

    -The text “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” teeters between educational and entertainment screen time. Remind students that they are only considering the benefits and risks of entertainment screen time. If they want to use some of the information presented in this article as evidence in their own papers, they need to contextualize the information carefully.

    -Students will turn in their Tracing an Argument Note-Catcher from Work Time B. It will serve as Bi-weekly Assessment 2 and will assess RI.7.8 and SL.7.3. Make sure to utilize the 2nd Note-catcher that students complete as the biweekly assessment. Students should complete the 2nd note-catcher independently.

    -Be sure to review the Note-catchers, provide feedback, and aim to return them with feedback before Lesson 5, which is when students will again fill in a Tracing an Argument Note-catcher as part of their researcher’s notebook.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Finding Relevant Information and Asking Research Questions: The Benefits of Video Games

    Instructional Protocol: GoGoMo

    This lesson is a formal introduction to the overarching research question of the unit. The researcher’s road map and researcher’s notebook build from those used in Modules 2A and 2B. This lesson is written as a review of their use. However, if this is the first time students have seen these materials, consider how the lesson might be adapted to become a full introduction to the road map and notebook.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Paraphrasing and Evaluating Sources: “Gaming Can Make a Better World” Video: “Gaming Makes a Better World”

    Text: “Video Games Benefit Children, Study Finds”

    The text is used as a read aloud at the end of class. Students are to fill in a section of their researcher's notebook for homework. The researcher's notebook needs to be completed to support the writing in upcoming lessons. Allow time to complete the notebook in class if completing it for homework is a concern.

  • Week 5: May 14

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    6

    7 / 8

    9 / 10

    11

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 6: RI.7.9

    Lesson 7/8: W.7.8  L.7.4

    Lesson 9/10: W.7.8

    Lesson 11: RI.7.3 RI.7.8 SL.7.3

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    • Lesson 8 ties in with the concept of cascading consequences, which is introduced in Lesson 13. Preview Lesson 13 in advance, to foreshadow ideas from that lesson as students move through the article in Lesson 8. Consider having students discuss how the consequences in Question 3 are “cascading consequences”—that is, how one consequence causes another in a domino-type effect.
    • Lessons 9 and 10 require the use of computers to search the Internet and recommends the use of a student-friendly search engine, such as Sweet Search. If computers aren't available in the classroom, schedule a visit to the school library or computer lab.
    • Students evaluate sources, conduct research about screen time, and complete part 1 of the Mid-Unit 2 assessment.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Contrasting Evidence: “Games Can Make a Better World” and “Video Games Benefit Children, Study Finds”

    • The purpose of this lesson is to give students a sense of how differing arguments can support the same claim.
    • Multiple graphic organizers and note sheets are used simultaneously in the lesson. Preview these in advance to envision the logistics. As the lesson proceeds, consider modeling how to set up these papers physically in the student workspace for the most efficient use.
    • The text “Why Facebook Could Actually Be Good for Your Mental Health” is used as a read aloud at the end of class. Students fill in a section of their researcher's notebook for homework.
    • Venn diagrams are used in this lesson as a tool for students to examine the evidence in both the video and the article. Students, however, may not have used one or may not have participated in previous modules. The lesson is written to address students who may not have used this type of graphic organizer before. Determine whether any part of the lesson needs to be modified for students who are unfamiliar with Venn Diagrams.

     

    Combine Lessons 7 and 8:

    Evaluating Sources: The ONLINE EDUCA Debate 2009 (Part 2 of 10) & Using Effective Search Terms Researching Screen Time

    • Omit Openings A and B in Lesson 7. Add the definition of 'akin' to the Domain-Specific Vocabulary anchor chart during the closing and assessment portion of the lesson. Condense Work Time A to 5 minutes.
    • The text, “Attached to Technology and Paying the Price,” is homework and will be used in Lesson 8 to answer text dependent questions.
    • Omit Closing and Assessment A in Lesson 8. Students can either complete the exercise in conjunction with Lessons 9 and 10, or the teacher can model for students the importance of effective search terms and how to combine keywords from texts to conduct further research on a topic.

     

    Combine Lessons 9 and 10:

    Gathering Information about Screen Time: Assessing and Reading Internet Sources, Day 1 & Day 2

    Omit Work Time A in Lesson 9. Combine Work Time A and B from both lessons. As teachers prepare students for research, they can simultaneously set a purpose for doing research. Students will have approximately 30 minutes less of research time since these two lesson are combined. Combine Closing and Assessments from both lessons as students can discuss the challenges of conducting research and write about the information they gathered and what information they still need.

     

    Lesson 11:

    Mid-Unit Assessment, Part 1: Tracing and Evaluating Arguments This lesson is the Mid Unit Assessment

    Omit the Instructional Protocol: I Have/Who Has? so that students have ample time to complete the assessment.

  • Week 6: May 21

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    12

    13

    14

    15

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly #3

    Lesson 12, Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Simulated Research Task: Screen Time

    Utilize Question 4 as the Bi-Weekly assessment: List two pieces of information from each source that would help you answer the question: “Should the AAP raise the recommended daily entertainment screen time from two hours to four hours?”

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 12: W.7.7, W.7.8, L.7.4

    Lesson 13: W.7.1 W.7.9

    Lesson 14: W.7.1 W.7.9 SL.7.4

    Lesson 15: L.7.9  W.7.1  W.7.9  SL.7.2.a  SL.7.4

    Standard Assessed

    B3: W.7.8

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    The lessons (13 & 14) on cascading consequences are among the most challenging of this unit. Feel free to modify and differentiate the lessons according to your professional judgment so that all students may reach the learning targets. If time permits, consider breaking the activities in Lessons 13 and 14 into three days of instruction. Students complete part 2 of the Mid-Unit 2 assessment. This week's lessons prepare students to produce their position paper and their Fishbowl discussion for the final performance task.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Mid-Unit Assessment, Part II: Research Task: Comparing and Contrasting Texts

    Bi-weekly assessment 3 consists of question #4 from part 2 of the mid-unit assessment. Question 4: List two pieces of information from each source that would help you answer the question: “Should the AAP raise the recommended daily entertainment screen time from two hours to four hours?” This question assessed is W.7.8.

     

    Lessons 13:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Introducing Stakeholders and Consequences

    -Students are introduced to stakeholders and the Cascading Consequences chart, which provide a way for them to create a visual “map” of the consequences of a particular choice or course of action.

    -The homework for this lesson is detailed and challenging. Consider making advanced preparations within the next lesson in case students need extra assistance with the homework when returning to class. Refer to the Meeting Students’ Needs column to differentiate the homework ahead of time.

     

    Lesson 14:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Comparing Cascading Consequences

    Instructional Protocol: Triad Talk

    -Become familiar with the Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making  process. See Unit 2 overview and Module overview for more information.

    –Read the details of Work Time A and fill in a Comparing Risks and Benefits chart to better understand the thought process.

     

    Lesson 15:

    Forming a Research-Based Claim: Analyzing Risks and Benefits for Stakeholder

    Instructional Protocol: World Café

    Students should be familiar with and move fairly quickly through the World Café protocol; however; this lesson may take more than 45 minutes. If time permits, consider breaking the lesson across two days (splitting it between Rounds II and III of the World Café protocol) or reducing the number of rounds.

  • Week 7: May 28

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    16

    17

    1

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 16: RI.7.9.a  W.7.1  SL.7.1  SL.7.1.a  SL.7.4

    Lesson 17: RL.7.9  W.7.1  W.7.9

    Lesson 1: RI 7.8, L 7.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Lessons 18 and 19 were omitted; however, teachers can use their discretion, if time allows, to provide students with opportunities to prepare and present their claims. Students participate in a Fishbowl and and choose a position for their final paper.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students draft, revise, and present their position papers with a visual representation to conclude the final performance task.

     

    Lesson 16:

    End of Unit 2 Assessment, Parts 1A and 1B: Fishbowl on Screen Time and Adolescents

    Instructional Protocol: Fishbowl

    • This lesson is in many ways a culmination and celebration of the reading and research students have done thus far in this unit. It provides an opportunity for each student to share his or her learning aloud with the class, as well as to learn from classmates’ research before committing to a position.
    • The Fishbowl Statement is a written synthesis of the preparation students have done for homework the night before and addresses the standard W.7.1, which asks students to advocate persuasively. Consider collecting and assessing it to see how your students are performing on that standard. However, it may be useful to the students in Lesson 17 when they choose a position.

     

    Lesson 17:

    Choosing a Position: Screen Time and Adolescents

    Students use the Decision Statement Graphic Organizer to form their position statement.

     

    Omit Lessons 18 and 19:

    See the weekly notes. Omitting these lessons also allots more time for students to present their final performance task at the end of the unit.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Analyzing a Model Position Paper: “Facebook: Not for Kids”

    • The Model Position Paper Planner is lengthy; consider providing scaffolds for students to engage them in the writing process.
    • Ensure that students have their researcher’s notebook from Unit 2, Lesson 18
    • Make sure students can access their reflections (Writing Improvement Tracker) from Module 3.
    • Read the model position paper “Facebook: Not for Kids” in advance to prepare to analyze it with students.
  • Week 8: June 4

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    2 / 3

    4

    5

    7 / 8

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 2/3: W 7.1, W 7.4a, W 7.5, W 7.6

    Lesson 4: W 7.5, W 7.8

    Lesson 5: W 7.1, W 7.4, W 7.9

    Lesson 7/8: RL 7.11b, RI 7.10, W 7.9, W 7.4, W 7.5

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    For Lesson 5, be sure to think about how students will submit their drafts at the end of class (printing, emailing, Google Classroom, etc.). If computers are unavailable, consider giving students more time to handwrite their essays. If writing essays by hand, have students double-space to make revision easier. Students plan, draft, and revise the introduction, conclusion, and body paragraphs of their position paper.

     

    Combine Lessons 2 and 3:

    Scaffolding for Essay: Planning & Clarifying Body Paragraphs for Position Paper, Introduction and Conclusion

    • Shift the order these lessons to  meet students’ needs. Have students write their introduction; use the “talk-through” in this lesson to clarify the building blocks represented in the introduction; and then write their body paragraphs.
    • Omit Work Time B from Lesson 2. The check-in can occur during small groups.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Scaffolding for Position Paper: Peer Feedback and Citing Sources

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Feedback

    This is the second in a series of “talk-through” lessons that take place before students are asked to draft their position paper as the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment in the next lesson. Students summarize the entire paper for two peers. The peers provide feedback by completing feedback response forms, which they then give to the writer.

     

    Lesson 5:

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Drafting the Position Paper

    • Students write the draft of their position paper about a screen time recommendation for the AAP.
    • Consider posting a list of the resources available to help students write their essays.

     

    Omit Lesson 6

    Independent Reading: Final Product

    Students can complete independent reading activity in small groups.

     

    Combine Lessons 7 and 8:

    End of Unit Assessment, Part 1: Revising Claims and Evidence & Vocabulary and Conventions Based on Feedback

    • Condense Work Time B in Lesson 7 to 5 minutes.
    • Omit Opening A for Lessons 7and 8. Students can process feedback in Lesson 8 during Work Time A as they review teacher feedback and the teacher circulates.
    • Omit Work Time B from lesson 8. Students can make revisions to their position papers at home.
  • Week 9: June 11

    Module

    4a

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    9

    10

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: W 7.4a, W 7.5, W 7.6

    Lesson 10: W.7.4a, W.7.5, L.7.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Have students' Improvement Trackers from Module 1 available for Lesson 10. Students complete the final draft of their position paper and share the visual representations for their papers.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Finishing the End of Unit Assessment: Final Draft of Position Paper and Reflection on the Writing Process

    For Work Time B, before releasing students to find images for their presentation, model how to select powerful images and ensure students copy and paste images into their document.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Final Performance Task: Sharing Visual Representations of Position Papers

    Students reflect on their growth as writers over the course of the year using their Writing Improvement Trackers (begun in Module 1 and used in each module).