Q4 8th Grade ELA Pacing Guides SY 2017-18

Q1

SY 17-18

Q2

SY 17-18

Q3

SY 17-18

Q4

SY 17-18

Overview

 

Module 4: Topic: Research, Decision-Making, and Forming Positions: Sustainability of World's Food Supply

In this module, students analyze arguments and the evidence used to support arguments to determine whether sufficient evidence has been used and whether the evidence is relevant in support of the claim an author or speaker is making. They then research to gather evidence to make their own spoken and written arguments. Students will read Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma (930L), a literary non-fiction text about where food comes from and about making decisions about what food to buy and eat. They build background knowledge about what happens to food before it gets to the consumer, and the different choices the consumer can make when buying food while analyzing Michael Pollan’s arguments and the evidence he uses to support his claims.

 

In Unit 2, students engage in a robust research project in which they further investigate the consequences of each of the food chains and the stakeholders affected in those food chains. To help students grapple with this issue, they use a decision-making process called “Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making” (see the end of this document for details). This process will help students understand the implications of various choices, and will scaffold their ability to determine, based on evidence and their own values, to take a position on which food chain they would choose if they were trying to feed everyone in the US.

 

Students finish the module by writing a position paper explaining which of Michael Pollan’s food chain they would choose to feed the US and why, and creating a poster stating their position. This task addresses ELA Standards RI.8.1,W.8.1, W.8.1a, W.8.1b, W.8.1c, W.8.1d, W.8.1e and W.8.9.

 

ANet Resources

 

For Support with Instructional Protocols, utilize this document.

  • Guided & Independent Reading Alignment to the Module Topic

    Grade 8 Recommended Texts

    This link provides a list of engaging and accessible texts with text difficulty ranging from grades 2-8 and Lexiles 630-1240. These texts give students opportunities to practice strategies taught during core instruction, build background knowledge around the Module topic, strengthen fluency, and engage in guided and/or independent reading. Keep in mind that these texts not only support independent and/or guided reading, but can also function as a supplemental resource to reteach standards students struggled with through small group instruction.

  • Week 1: April 16

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    1

    2

    3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 1: RI.8.1, RI.8.2, RI.8.10

    Lesson 2: RI.8.1, RI.8.2, RI.8.4, L.8.4

    Lesson 3: RI.8.6, RI.8.8

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    Gather materials in advance to decorate classroom like a restaurant. Investing in the classroom environment can support students' engagement in throughout the module.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students begin reading Pollan's The Omnivore Dilemma. They read for gist and analyze the author's purpose to gain an understanding of the dilemma that an omnivore faces.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students analyze authors' and speakers' purposes, the claims that they make, and the whether or not the evidence used to support these claims is relevant. In the final performance task, students will need to write a position paper based on their synthesis of the claims made by Michael Pollan in The Omnivore’s Dilemma.

     

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 1:

    Building Background Knowledge: What IS the Omnivore's Dilemma Anyway?

    Instructional Protocols: Teammates Consult, Gallery Walk

    Determine how you will set up your classroom so that it resembles a restaurant in order to set the tone for The Omnivore's Dilemma.

     

    Lesson 2:

    Reading for Gist and Answering Text Dependent Questions

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    Advance Reading: Read pages 22-25 of "I Plant Corn." Preview the text dependent questions that students will be asked in order to facilitate discussion. Consider scripting possible student responses and writing follow-up questions to enhance student thinking.

     

    Lesson 3:

    Analyzing Author's Purpose

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    Author's Purpose Graphic Organizer will be used in the mid-unit assessment. In the Supporting Materials packet, preview the Author's Purpose Graphic Organizer and answer key in order to facilitate discussion. Combine and assign the homework for lessons 3 and 4.

  • Week 2: April 23

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    4 / 5

    6

    7

    8

    Assessment

    Biweekly #1

    Lesson 7, Analyzing Author’s and Speaker’s Purpose Graphic Organizer, Part 2: Conflicting Viewpoints and Evidence

    Utilize this question for the bi-weekly assessment: What conflicting viewpoints has the author put forward? Why? Make sure that students complete this question independently.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lessons 4/5: RI.8.2, RI.8.4, RI.8.6, RI.8.8, L.8.4

    Lesson 6: SL.8.2

    Lesson 7: RI.8.6, SL.8.2, L.8.4

    Lesson 8: RI.8.2, RI.8.4

    Standard Assessed

    B2: RI.6.9

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    Students will need a copy of the central text for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 7.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students continue to read for the gist and analyze the author's purpose in addition to the speaker's purpose in a media excerpt. In Lesson 7, students complete the Mid-Unit Assessment.

     

    Daily Notes

    Combine Lessons 4 and 5:

    Reading for Gist, Answering Text Dependent Questions, and Determining Author's Purpose

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    Prioritize students' completion of the Author's Purpose graphic organizer and utilize questions 5 and 6 from Lesson 4's Text Dependent Questions graphic organizer as a quick check for students' understanding. These questions can be discussed orally in 5 minutes or less. Students can jigsaw the readings, complete the author's purpose graphic organizers, and share out their responses for their peers to record.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Analyzing a Speaker's Purpose and Motives of a Media Excerpt

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    For this lesson, students watch a video that has a clear purpose and is related to The Omnivore's Dilemma. The video "America's Food Crisis: The Omnivore's Dilemma" is the recommended for students, available here.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Purpose in Speech and Text

    The bi-weekly assessment comes from Part 2 of the Mid-Unit Assessment, where students analyze conflicting viewpoints and evidence, and assesses RI.8.6. Utilize this question as the bi-weekly assessment: What conflicting viewpoints has the author put forward? Why? Make sure that students complete this question independently.

    -Students will need a copy of the central text so that they can cite text evidence as they identify conflicting viewpoints and explain why these perspectives are at odds.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Reading for Gist and Answering Text-Dependent Questions: Local Sustainable Food Chain

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    This lesson is the first in the two-lesson cycle in which students build background knowledge about Michael Pollan’s local sustainable food chain. In preparation for the end of unit assessment, students work in pairs without any teacher modeling to determine the gist and answer text dependent questions.

  • Week 3: April 30

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    Lesson

    9

    11

    12 / 13

    14

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: SL.8.3, RI.8.8

    Lesson 11: SL.8.3, RI.8.8

    Lesson 12/13: SL.8.2, RI.8.9, SL.8.2, RI.8.9

    Lesson 14: RI.8.8, RI.8.9, SL.8.3

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    See Lesson 9's notes for pre-work.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    The Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer is introduced to students this week, after which they make a claim based on their assessment of the argument.

     

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 9:

    Evaluating An Argument

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult, Think-Pair-Share

    The Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer is used in the end of unit assessment. Read pages 161–166 and read the answer key for the Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer prior to teaching this lesson. This will help to familiarize teachers with students' task as well as anticipated responses.

     

    Omit Lesson 10:

    Reading for the Gist and Answering Text Dependent Questions

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    Since students already read Chapter 20 of The Omnivore's Dilemma for homework in the previous lesson, they can complete the text dependent questions for homework in addition to reading Chapter 21 of the central text. Teachers may choose to have students complete all of the questions or select specific questions for students to answer.

     

    Lesson 11:

    Evaluating An Argument

    Instructional Protocol: Teammates Consult

    Since there is no homework for Lesson 11, have students begin working on homework for Lesson 12 (Developing a Claim Ticket). Over the course of the Q1-3 Modules, students had practice constructing claims. They can revise their claim tickets during the independent work time for Lessons 12 and 13.

     

    Combine Lessons 12 and 13:

    Making a Claim and Advocating Persuasively

    Instructional Protocol: Peer Critique, Fishbowl

    Combine the mini lessons from Lessons 12 and 13. Ensure that all additions to the Advocating Persuasively Criteria anchor chart, from both lessons, are included. Focus primarily on the mini-lesson in Lesson 13 for 5-7 minutes. Students can simultaneously prepare and practice their claims while receiving feedback for 5 to 10 minutes in pairs or triads, after which students can transition into the fishbowl simulation for 15-20 minutes with their revised claims, points, and evidence.

     

    Lesson 14:

    End of Unit Assessment Parts 1 and 2: Evaluating Arguments and Claims

    Do Lesson 15's homework instead of Lesson 14's since students will not complete Part 3 of the assessment.

  • Week 4: May 7

    Module

    4

    Unit

    1

    2

    Lesson

    15

    1

    2 / 3

    4

    Assessment

    Biweekly #2

    Lesson 15, Utilize the 2nd Question from the Exit Ticket as the bi-weekly assessment:

    Which meal did you advocate persuasively for? Why?

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 15: RI.8.9, SL.8.2

    Lesson 1: RI.8.1, W.8.7

    Lessons 2&3: W.8.7, W.8.8

    Lesson 4: W.8.7

    Standard Assessed

    B2: RI.8.6

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    The focus question for the Unit 2 is "Which of Michael Pollan’s four food chains would best feed all the people in the United States?" Post this focus question in the classroom so that students will see it throughout the unit. Students answer this question in their position speech at the end of the unit. The homework in Lesson 3 requires that students complete the researcher’s notebook using the article they chose in class (if they have not done so by the end of class). This would require the students to print the articles, save them, or access them at home. Consider which option(s) would work best for students and prepare accordingly. Google Classroom may support students with accessing work at home.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    This week, students complete Part 3 of the End of Unit Assessment and examine the industrial food chain through the completion of a decision-making process called Cascading Consequences, which enables them to unpack positive and negative effects of this food chain. .

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    In Unit 2, students' unpack the implications associated with each food chain, which prepares them to write the position paper about what food chain they would select to feed everyone in the United States as the final performance task.

     

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 15:

    Assessment Part 3: Advocating Persuasively in a Fishbowl

    Instructional Protocol: Fishbowl

    The bi-weekly assessment is taken from question 2 of this lesson's exit ticket and addresses RI.8.6: After students participate in a fishbowl, they are asked, Which meal did you advocate persuasively for? Why? Have students support their meal choice with evidence from the text.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Determining Cascading Consequences Using The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Industrial Food Chain

    Review the sample Cascading Consequences charts in the supporting materials and the think-aloud portion of the lesson.

     

    Combine Lessons 2 and 3:

    Further Research: Industrial Food Chain

    Condense the mini lesson in Lesson 2 by omitting the Question Set A and B activity. Focus primarily on introducing the Good Supporting Research Questions Are...anchor chart for 3 minutes. Transition into the Numbered Heads Activity. Lesson 3's Work Time A can be combined with Lesson 2's homework. Limit paraphrasing mini-lesson to 5-10 minutes as students will need ongoing support as they develop their speeches in this unit and their position papers in Unit 3.

     

    Lesson 4:

    Adding to Cascading Consequences and Stakeholders: Industrial Food Chain

    Students will need their Industrial Food Chain Cascading Consequences charts from Lesson 1 for this lesson.

  • Week 5: May 14

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 5: RI.8.1, W.8.7

    Lesson 6: W.8.7, W.8.8

    Lesson 7: W.8.7

    Lesson 8: RI.8.1, W.8.7

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    In preparation for lesson 5, identify two students to model creating a Cascading Consequences chart with you in the mini lesson.

    Share the script and Cascading Consequences chart with them in advance so they have time to prepare. The homework in Lesson 6 requires that students complete the researcher’s notebook using the article they chose in class (if they have not done so by the end of class). This would require the students print the articles, save them, or access them at home. Consider which option(s) would work best for students and prepare accordingly. Google Classroom may support students with accessing work at home. Google Classroom may support students with accessing work at home.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students continue their work with Cascading Consequences and research related to industrial food chains.

     

    Daily Notes

    Lesson 5:

    Determining Cascading Consequences Using The Omnivore’s Dilemma:  Industrial Organic Food Chain

    Review the script for modeling the creation of the team Cascading Consequences chart and the Industrial Organic Food Chain Cascading Consequences chart for mini lesson. Make sure students who were pre-selected are prepared to help with the modeling.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Using Search Terms for Further Research: Industrial Organic Food Chain

    There are three new features on the researcher’s notebook for this food chain: the search terms chart in the Gathering Sources section of the notebook (page 4), the Assessing Credibility section (page 5), and the Evaluating the Source section (pages 6 and 7). These new features will continue to appear for each of the remaining food chains. Note that Part B of Evaluating the Source is an extension for those students who have time to complete it. Determine what supports students will need in order to access these new features.

     

    Lesson 7:

    Adding to Cascading Consequences and Stakeholders: Industrial Organic Food Chain

    -Prior to this lesson, create a blank Venn diagram titled “Industrial Food According to Baehr and Pollan” on chart paper or board.

    -The final activity in the Closing is not part of the assessment. Instead, it pushes student thinking to further compare the speech and the excerpt of text, as the two are linked in content.

     

    Lesson 8:

    Local Sustainable Food Chain: Determining Cascading Consequences Using The Omnivore’s Dilemma

    -This is the first in the two-lesson cycle in which students build background knowledge about Michael Pollan’s local sustainable food chain.

    -Prior to teaching this lesson, read pages 161–166 (up to “Letting Chickens be Chickens”). Consider the gist of each paragraph and the answers to the text-dependent questions students are asked.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Further Research: Local Sustainable Food Chain

    -Students are introduced to the Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer; it will be used in the end of unit assessment.

    - Before teaching this lesson, fill in the Evaluating an Argument graphic organizer to evaluate the argument Michael Pollan puts forth on pages 161–166 of The Omnivore’s Dilemma together with the class to serve as a model for students.

  • Week 6: May 21

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    9

    10

    11

    12

    Assessment

    Mid-Unit Assessment

    Biweekly 3

    Lesson 11, Mid-Unit Assessment, Utilize Part 1: Paraphrasing, Question 3. as the bi-weekly assessment: In the space below, paraphrase the consequences of a food desert.

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 9: W.8.7, W.8.8

    Lesson 10: W.8.7

    Lesson 11: W.8.7, W.8.8

    Lesson 12: RI.8.1, W.8.7

    Standard Assessed

    B3: W.8.8

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    The homework in Lesson 9 requires that students complete the researcher’s notebook using the article they chose in class (if they have not done so by the end of class). This would require the students print the articles, save them, or access them at home. Consider which option(s) would work best for your students and prepare accordingly. Google Classroom may support students with accessing work at home.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students continue their work with Cascading Consequences and research related to industrial food chains. They also complete the Mid-Unit assessment in Lesson 11.

     

    Lesson 9:

    Further Research: Local Sustainable Food Chain

    After teaching this lesson, consider checking in with students and/or collecting their Researcher’s Notebooks to briefly assess their understanding of MLA citation in preparation for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 11.

     

    Lesson 10:

    Adding to Cascading Consequences and Stakeholders: Local Sustainable Food Chain

    • This is the first in the two-lesson cycle in which students build background knowledge about Michael Pollan’s hunter-gatherer food chain.
    • Before teaching this lesson, read pages 240–245 (up to “Things as They Are”), considering the gist of each paragraph and the answers to the text-dependent questions students are asked. The Supporting Materials includes answers for teacher reference.

     

    Lesson 11:

    Mid-Unit Assessment: Research Simulation

    • This lesson launches the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, which assesses the research skills students have been practicing throughout this unit. The assessment, a research simulation, is designed to mimic the research process within the confines of an on-paper assessment. Bi-weekly assessment 3 comes from this lesson and will be assessed in part 1 of the research simulation, question 3, where students are asked to paraphrase the consequences of a food desert. This question assesses W.8.8.
    • Ensure that assessments are graded prior to teaching lesson 13, which is when students receive feedback on the assessment.

     

    Lesson 12:

    Determining Cascading Consequences Using The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Hunter-Gatherer Food Chain

    Prior to teaching, review the Hunter-Gatherer Food Chain Cascading Consequences chart (for teacher reference) to help you while you are circulating during Work Time.

  • Week 7: May 28

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    Lesson

    13

    14

    15

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 13: W.8.7, W.8.8

    Lesson 14: W.8.7

    Lesson 15: SL.8.4

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    The homework in Lesson 13 requires that students to complete the researcher’s notebook using the article they chose in class (if they have not done so by the end of class). This would require the students to print the articles, save them, or access them at home. Consider which option(s) would work best for your students and prepare accordingly. Google Classroom may support students with accessing work at home.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students complete the Cascading Consequences exercises and write a presentation speech to wrap up the unit by answering the following question: Which of Michael Pollan’s four food chains would best feed the United States?

     

    Lessons 13:

    Further Research: Hunter-Gatherer Food Chain

    • Hand back students' assessments from Lesson 11.
    • Preview the Exit Ticket: Developing a Supporting Research Question: Consequences of the Hunter-Gatherer Food Chain from the previous lesson to ensure students are on the right track with their research questions. Be prepared to guide students who need assistance before they begin researching in this lesson.

     

    Lesson 14:

    • Adding to Cascading Consequences and Stakeholders: Hunter-Gatherer Food Chain
    • This is the last lesson in which students consider consequences and stakeholders of food chains.

     

    Lesson 15:

    Writing a Position Speech

    • The Position Speech graphic organizer is the a first draft of students' outline for their position paper.
    • Prior to teaching the lesson, ensure the class Industrial Food Chain Cascading Consequences chart from Lessons 1–4 has the “Food is cheap” consequence. Cascading from that consequence should be “Foods processed to be sweet, fat, and cheap so we’ll eat more.” Cascading from that consequence should be “Obesity increases.” This will be necessary for the counterclaim model shown to the class.
  • Week 8: June 4

    Module

    4

    Unit

    2

    3

    Lesson

    16

    17

    1

    2 / 3

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 16: SL.8.4, SL.8.5, SL.8.6

    Lesson 17: SL.8.4

    Lesson 1: W.8.1

    Lesson 2/3: W.8.1

    Notes:

    Weekly Overview

    Students will need their Position Speech graphic organizers and their adapted position speeches from Lessons 15 and 16 as they write their position papers in Unit 3. Students present their position speeches as a part of the End-Unit Assessment in addition to constructing their position paper.

     

    Unit Alignment to the Performance Task

    Students plan and construct their position paper, which that serves as the final performance task.

     

    Lesson 16

    Creating a Visual Component for the Speech

    Instructional Protocol: Stars and Steps Protocol

    Towards the end of the lesson, students practice their speeches with a partner who is not in their research team. Consider determining these pairings in advance according to criteria such as speech topic, skill level, or student comfort level.

     

    Lesson 17:

    Presentation of Position (End of Unit Assessment)

    • Students will need their Position Speech graphic organizers and their adapted position speeches in the next unit as they write their position papers.
    • Students may need extra time to complete their adapted speeches, and may need to take them home to finish for homework. If time permits, students should be given the opportunity to present their adapted speeches to complete the assessment of standard SL.8.6.

     

    Lesson 1:

    Analyzing a Model Position Paper

    The end of unit assessment starts with this lesson. Be sure to review the model position paper in advance before supporting students with their own analysis of it.

     

    Lessons 2 and 3:

    Planning Body Paragraphs of Position Paper and

    Beginning Mid-Unit 3 Assessment & Mid-Unit Assessment: Draft of Position Paper

    Omit Opening B of Lesson 3. Students can complete Work Time A and B of Lesson 3 for homework. Review the purpose of introductory and concluding paragraphs and if time permits, once students complete their body paragraphs (Lesson 2), then they can begin to draft their introductions and conclusions for their position paper.

  • Week 9: June 11

    Module

    4

    Unit

    3

    Lesson

    4 / 5

    6

    Assessment

    ANet

    Standards Addressed in Week's Lessons

    Lesson 4/5: W.8.4, W.8.1

    Lesson 6: W.8.4

    Notes:

    Weekly Notes

    Before students begin the final draft of their position papers in Lesson 5, provide them with feedback. Since students may take their initial drafts home, consider having them work on their visual representations first to allot time for feedback. This would mean that Lessons 4 and 6 would be combined and students will work on their final position paper last. If there is an art teacher, collaborating with him/her to help students complete their visual representations can provide more classroom time for students to work on their visual representations as well as their final position papers.

     

    Weekly Lesson Overview

    Students complete the final version of their performance task and design a visual representation of their paper to share with their classmates via a gallery walk.

     

    Combine Lessons 4 and 5:

    Introducing the Performance Task Prompt & Beginning a Visual Representation

    & Final Position Paper

    Condense Work Time A in Lesson 4 to 5-7 minutes. Circulate to support students and conduct further checks for understanding. Communicate to students that as they write their final position papers and incorporate feedback, this can help them to fine tune their visual representations. Students may even begin to make revisions to their draft as they begin working on their visual representation and reference the Effective Visual Representation anchor chart. If available/applicable, share exemplars of students' visual representations from previous years to inspire students and help them to understand the expectations for completing this performance task. Students can also take their visual representations home to complete as homework.

     

    Lesson 6:

    Sharing Visual Representations of Position Papers

    Instructional Protocol: Gallery Walk

    Since this lesson concludes all of students' work, ensure that the climate is celebratory as students participate in the gallery walk and post notes to praise their classmates final performance task.